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Thread: What Book Are You Reading?

  1. #871
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    Hi All,
    Having now read The Secret Hunters and especially Mr Fienes epilogue I am tending to think that the book is based on an actual account. Some of the descriptions given I have read similar accounts or watched in documentaries, even if fictitious still a very graphic great read as there has obviously been a lot of research done to write the book even down to finding actual people mentioned.....

    Just about to start:- Antarctica (1997) is a science fiction novel by American writer Kim Stanley Robinson. It deals with a variety of characters living at or visiting an Antarctic research station. It incorporates many of Robinson's common themes, including scientific process and the importance of environmental protection. (Courtesy of Wiki)



    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 22nd April 2018 at 19:18.

  2. #872
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    Just ordered this.

    I love a good bit of fantasy and make believe.

    http://unmpress.com/books.php?ID=20000000008622

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    Moggy
    Last edited by Moggy C; 30th April 2018 at 19:33.
    "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

  3. #873
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    Hi All,
    SSGB by Len Deighton:- SS-GB is an alternative history novel by Len Deighton, set in a United Kingdom conquered and occupied by Germany during the Second World War. The novel's title refers to the branch of the Nazi SS that controls Britain. (Courtesy of Wikipedia)



    Geoff.

  4. #874
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    Hi All,
    The Ultimate Insult by Maria Leach. Every memorable insult that has ever been thrown by the rich and famous is included in this book. Arranged thematically, it includes sections on politics, relationships, television and sex......



    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 8th May 2018 at 11:48.

  5. #875
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    "1864", Tom Buk-Swienty, Profile Books Ltd. £8.99.

    1864 refers to the date of the last of the wars between Denmark and the Germans over possession of the two Duchies of Schleswig and Holstein that lie across the southern part of the Jutland peninsular.

    German aggression, Danish intransigence and British acquiescence all played their part in this quite savage and largely unknown military conflict.

    The Danes had the support of the British public but, Queen Victoria, one of whose relatives was married into the German monarchy, wished to remain on the side lines.

    I wonder if anyone knows why the Danes did not claim back their territorial losses after 1918 or possibly 1945 ?

  6. #876
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    Hi All,
    One Foot In The Grave by David Renwick, two chapters in and it's easy to see why it was a funny series... Victor's life is far too complicated, with a python in his luggage, a body search at the airport, a dead tomcat in the freezer, the charred remains of a neighbour on the kitchen table and then there are the 200 garden gnomes.

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    Geoff.

  7. #877
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    Hi All,
    Darwin And The Barnacle By Rebecca Stott. Pairing Charles Darwin and a rare species of barnacle as her unlikely protagonists, Stott has written an absorbing work of history, a book that guides readers through the treacherous shoals of 19th-century biology. 32 illustrations.....



    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 14th May 2018 at 21:08.

  8. #878
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    I was a little young when the Harry Potter phenomenon came around, but only started reading it now On book 2 atm, and I finally see why it's such a success. Going to read the books and then watch the movies!

  9. #879
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    Re. "1864", Tom Buk-Swienty, Profile Books Ltd. £8.99.

    I remamber watching a TV serial based on the evnts in this book. a few years ago. I think it was made in Denmark, and dubbed into English.

    It was shown on BBC4, if i remember correctly.

    cabbage

  10. #880
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    Air Battle for Dunkirk - Norman Franks

    Only just started reading it.
    Daren Cogdon

    Spitfire fanatic

  11. #881
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    Neptune's Inferno..by James Hornfischer
    The story of the naval battles of Guadalcanal...
    Coming soon after the U.S. victories at the battles of Midway and Coral Sea, it taught the USN that the Japanese were still a force to be reckoned with. At the end of the various battles, each had lost 24 ships, plus the Japanese lost the contested island and thousands of soldiers and marines.

    While the U.S. (and to a small degree the RAN) lost more more sailors than the Japanese, who decisively won the first battle, it became a strategic Allied victory. The difference was the U.S. could make good its losses, not so the IJN.

    Prompted by my reading of Harm's Way by James Bassett...the source for the 1965 John Wayne film In Harm's Way
    which is a fictionalized account of similar sea battles. The author was on the staff of Admiral Halsey, so he knew how to portray high ranking naval officers. Early chapters give a good psychological profile of the main characters so it's far more than the "stiff upper lip" and "aren't our boys so good" military fare.
    Last edited by J Boyle; 20th May 2018 at 01:35.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  12. #882
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    Hi All,
    The Dambusters by Paul Brickhill (1952 Companion Book Club Edition)

    The Dam Busters is a non-fiction book by Paul Brickhill about Royal Air Force Squadron 617 Originally commanded by Wing Commander Guy Gibson V.C.
    during World War II.



    Geoff.

  13. #883
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    Hi All,
    The Last British Dambuster by George Johnny Johnson. (One man's extraordinary life and the raid that changed history)

    " I was anxious to fight. Hitler was the b@stard who had started all this and he needed sorting out. We were under threat. Everything we stood for: our country, our families and our way of life was being attacked by this maniac. He could not be allowed to win. So for me and many, many others like me, there was no alternative. We were in a pickle and something had to be done. "



    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 29th May 2018 at 17:56.

  14. #884
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    Hi All,
    Enemy Coast Ahead (1946 Edition) by Guy Gibson. Enemy Coast Ahead is an autobiographical book recounting the World War II flying career of Wing Commander Guy Gibson VC, DSO, DFC. It covers his time in RAF Bomber Command from the very earliest days of war in 1939 through to 1943.



    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 3rd June 2018 at 09:02.

  15. #885
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    Hi All,
    Sharp Steel by William Alan Webb. Exiled with only a sword and a vow of vengeance… Together with his giant axe-wielding friend Dexter Reedman, Alden Havenwulf strides the wild landscape of Reven, a place filled with vampires that don’t drink blood, dragons that aren’t dragons, a were-beast that doesn’t change shape, and wizards, lots and lots of wizards. Return now to the days of sharp steel and high adventure!



    Geoff.

  16. #886
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    Hi All,
    Fear Is The Key by Alistair Mclean. A classic novel of ruthless revenge set in the steel jungle of an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico -- and on the sea bed
    below it. Now reissued in a new cover style. A sunken DC-3 lying on the Caribbean floor. Its cargo: ten million, two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in
    gold ingots, emeralds and uncut diamonds guarded by the remains of two men, one woman and a very small boy. The fortune was there for the taking,
    and ready to grab it were a blue-blooded oilman with his own offshore rig, a gangster so cold and independent that even the Mafia couldn't do business
    with him and a psychopathic hired assassin. Against them stood one man, and those were his people, those skeletons in their watery coffin. His name was
    Talbot, and he would bury his dead -- but only after he had avenged their murders.



    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 15th June 2018 at 18:35.

  17. #887
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    A great read above, can't go wrong with Alistair !!
    http://www.flightmemory.com/ I have been round the world 11.83 times!

  18. #888
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    "Berlin Noir"by Phillip Kerr.He has written a series of books about a Berlin detective(Bernie Gunther)that starts c1936 and ends up with his latest book set in Greece in 1957.Well researched and lots of good stuff leading up to and after WW2!

  19. #889
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    Hi All,
    Newforest:- Yes I am enjoying the book the beginning get's you thinking one way then it doe a complete 108 and sets you on another path. I am at the
    moment where Jablonski has just been killed then buried, Talbot in the meantime makes sure Valentino is off bodyguard duties to be replaced by Kendrick
    to protect Mary as they are about to embark to X13....

    Geoff.

  20. #890
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    '6 Weeks of Blenheim summer'

    A brilliant book, which is a sort of padded out diary written by a Blenheim pilot. it covers before, during and after Dunkirk and is an excellent read.

  21. #891
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    Hi All,
    Newforest - Excellent book matey thoroughly enjoyed it so will now buy all his books....

    The Shape Of Things To Come By H.G.Wells (Corgi Edition). The Shape of Things to Come is a work of science fiction by H. G. Wells, published in 1933, which speculates on future events from 1933 until the year 2106.



    EDIT: Having now finished the book this man was either very astute in imagining the future from observations of his own era (1930's) or an idealist he
    just imagined a world where everybody on the planet would end up equal and my reading between the lines he foresaw along with the Rise of Hitler

    :- WW2/the Spanish Flu/GMF's/GMO's/GMC's and I dare say the current gender free society that some want, along with many other current human
    activities in all fields you can think of, yet strangely no mention of Nuclear fission or the destructive power of Nuclear Weapons he could vision
    (Maybe because Fission only came about a few years after righting this book ?) None the less it does describe the world as becoming a New World Order
    that some today are alleging various billionaires are trying to impose and influence countries across the globe by dividing the people into various camps.

    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 4th July 2018 at 14:25.

  22. #892
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    I'm currently reading, Tactics to advertise for business. Ads Pro...

  23. #893
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    Hi All,
    War Dog by Damien Lewis. After getting shot down in the skies over France in the winter of 1939, airman Robert Bozdech stumbled across a tiny
    German Shepherd puppy. He hid the dog, whom he named Ant, inside his jacket, and from that moment on an unbreakable bond was formed. They flew
    together with Bomber Command, and when Ant was eventually grounded by the RAF top brass he waited patiently on the runway for his master to return
    from each and every sortie. By the end of the war Ant had become a very British hero. Thrilling and moving in equal measure, War Dog is a story of
    loyalty in the face of extraordinary adversity, and of the unshakeable bond between a man and his best friend.



    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 4th July 2018 at 13:59.

  24. #894
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    Co-authorship of books?

    So what do you think about co-authors?

    Every one has a book in them, so goes the fairy tale of the donkey and the carrot for aspiring first time authors.

    Famous authors 'needing' co-authors include James Patterson, Clive Cussler, Stephen King, Wilbur Smith and John Grisham.

    Is this just a money grab, make more money off of my name or a genuine altruistic attempt to encourage new blood?

    How much effort and advice does a star author provide? Has the star exhausted his well of inspirational ideas and needs a new blood transfusion?

    Questions prompted by my following of James Patterson in particular!
    http://www.flightmemory.com/ I have been round the world 11.83 times!

  25. #895
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    I'm sure every author pair is unique.
    I'm fairly sure some are done because the "star" is old or is juggling 3-4 series and he/she needs the help.

    I read a Cussler series set at the turn of the century (it often has aeroplanes and autos from that period that I'm interested in) that has a co-author so I've often wondered about the distribution of labor...and income.

    I'm a bit cynical about "new" Ian Flemming Bond or Tom Clancy books since those authors have been deceased for awhile, yet their names are is still prominently placed on book covers.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  26. #896
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    Babylon Berlin by Volker Kutscher
    I watched the mini-series on television interesting, the groups (democrats, communists, anarchists, monarchists, National Socialists) vying for power in late 1920s Berlin and found the premise interesting. Thankfully it is far more than just the stereotypical cartoon cut-out Nazis who are the usual "go to" bad guys.

    My only complaint is the translation was done by a UK writer and he uses UK-specific terms that I understand but may be a bit obscure to non-UK audiences.
    Last edited by J Boyle; 14th July 2018 at 06:55.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  27. #897
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    several months ago I visited Gilbert Whites House with my family and was enthralled by the Lawrence Oates exhibition there. For fathers day I received this book from my son and I started reading it the other night. Click image for larger version. 

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    If you're not living on the edge then you're taking up too much space!

  28. #898
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    Hi All,
    The Golden Gate by Alistair Maclean. A team of criminals led by mastermind Peter Branson kidnaps the President of the United States and his two
    guests from the Middle East, a prince and a king, on San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, in a masterfully conceived and clockwork-timed operation.
    Branson and his men block off both ends of the bridge, wire it with explosives, and demand half a billion dollars and a full pardon for themselves. Any rescue attempts will result in the detonation of the explosives, which will kill the President (and his guests) and destroy the Golden Gate Bridge.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Geoff.
    Last edited by 1batfastard; 15th July 2018 at 20:13.

  29. #899
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    "Forgotten Sacrifice", Michael Walling, Osprey Publishing, ISBN 978-1-84908-718-6, £18.99.

    This is an account of the Arctic convoys of WW2. It is a while since I've read a book that moved me so much. It is a compellingly awful tale of the utter misery, unendurable hardship, agonising cruelty and finally, testimony to the unqualified courage of the men and women who somehow made it thru' the violent storms and polar cold of the North Atlantic and Barents Sea delivering war material to the Soviet Union.

    Not for the fainthearted. Even at this distance in time, read it and weep.

  30. #900
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    " 1941- Politics and espionage and the secret pact between Roosevelt and Churchill". Marc Wortman, Atlantic Books, £10.99.

    The author gives an incisive and thoughtful account of America's belated entry into WW2. The reader is left wondering whether the U.S would actually have joined the fray if it hadn't been for Nippon's foray into Pearl Harbour.

    Apart from the main protagonists; Churchill and Roosevelt, there is the not widely known name of a remarkable American; Harry Hopkins described in the book as a 'Minister without Portfolio'. Mr Hopkins was an astute political go-between who was friend to both FDR and Winston. His contribution to Allied progress during the war cannot be overstated.

    The book covers the period from about the mid 1930s until the USAs entry into action. This book is never humdrum.

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