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Thread: Significant Memorabilia

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    North Devon
    Posts
    119
    A piece of lozenge fabric from the LVG CVI - bought at a Shuttlewoth display around 30 years ago after the LVG had been re-covered.

    Chris

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    83
    Hi All,

    Can I just say that the responses to this thread have far exceeded what I imagined when I started it.

    It has been fascinating reading and I think it's tremendous that these items are treasured and that their stories are being preserved by people with a passion.

    Well done!

    Cheers

    Owen
    http://www.owenzupp.com
    Author: 'Without Precedent', 'Down to Earth' and '50 Tales of Flight'

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    1,664
    An air aid spotters guide from 1943/4, bought for £5, with a hand written inscription detailing the frst owner's RAF service and subsequent demise in the last combat loss of 640 Sqn..... I was subseqently posted to the previous owner's base at RAF Leconfield and this book re-envigorated my interest in avation history. Its priceless to me.

    edit: I completely forgot that I have a section of fabric from PA474's Coventry Major...( part of the Mickey nose art ) and one of the Elevator W/T stencils. Can't and won't get rid of them - they mean too much. I had to wait 15 years to work on that aeroplane only to have the experience ruined.
    Last edited by Lindy's Lad; 8th December 2007 at 00:52.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    On the beach
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    2,445

    Parts.

    Boxes of scraps and parts recovered from the fields out at Oakey.Remembering these came from famous planes who defended Darwin and Australia during WW2.
    "If the C.O. ask's you to be Tail End Charlie...just shoot him!!!....A Piece of Cake.
    http://spitfirea58-27.blogspot.com.au/

  5. #35
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    121
    I have the log book medals and various bits to F/Sgt Albert Oxley, the DFC and family archive of F/Lt Rolf Cardale Luck and the medals of F/O Douglas Cowan Moore. All purchased separately. The special bit? All were part of the same Catalina crew lost on a special duty op' in Burma Oct '44. (Still looking for the rest of the crew!)

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,991

    Meteor F-3

    I have a 1/32 scale Gloster Meteor model made of metal that was reputedly on the OC's desk at Cranfield- would LOVE to know if its worth anything- very scratched and looking sorry for itself though

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    in the shed
    Posts
    732
    I've shown this before in another thread, but it's worth uploading again.

    An original copy of the Design Certificate for Flight Trials of Lancaster prototype BT308, dated 5th January 1941, and signed by Roy Chadwick.

    "nice..."
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    Who's the bloke in your avatar?

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=CtJ93VyKHpc

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    418
    I have the pilot's seat from Corsair IV KD621. Would love to know how it came to survive, as the actual aircraft was lost at sea during the war.

    Cheers,
    Richard

    PS. Snapper... thanks for that wonderful story about 'Babe' Haddon... it was wonderfully poignant, and equally well told.

    PPS. Lindy's Lad... how come your experience on PA474 was ruined?

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Birmingham
    Posts
    674
    A fired starter cartridge from Canberra WK163.

    I assisted with the aircraft's first full power engine runs after they had been overhauled two years ago.

    It was the first time I had been near a classic jet when it was being run and Chris Cawdron the propulsion engineer on the project gave me the cartridge as a souvineer.

    Whoosh ,whine,rumble.
    'Get the wheels in line, get the wheels in line......!'
    Those that can, do.Those that can't be bothered, talk about it!
    Classic Flight volunteer.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    172
    Further to my list of aircraft pieces.......or clutter as my better half calls it ! here are photo's of my bit's and pieces.
    The dials came from the Failsworth aircraft dump and the Prop blade from a farm field in Cheshire somewhere.








    [IMG]http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q273/skudupnorth/DSCN4079.jpg[IMG]


  11. #41
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    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington, West Sussex
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    340
    I have a 1931 Lasica flying helmet, including goggles and earpieces and tubes. Quite how this got over here from Australia is anyone's guess. I've tried many avenues and still haven't got an answer. It was found in a house loft near to Gatwick.
    All I can say is that the Lasica family don't know and that it definately wasn't brought over here by Nancy Bird Walton as she has recently confirmed it was not hers.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  12. #42
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    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario
    Posts
    254

    Chadburn DSO/DFC

    I have seen some amazing items, my forte is WW2 aircraft parts but the gem has to be original pilots notes from Lloyd Vernon Chadburn, Canadas finest squadron leader, sadly killed days after DDay, LVC was instrumental in getting his unit named the City of Oshawa squadron! thanks.
    Last edited by bolyman; 25th March 2009 at 00:38.

  13. #43
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    Jan 2006
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,084

    Wow!

    I'm in awe... I've nothing of any major significance nor size for that matter... minor trinkets really - my uncle's WWII RCAF survival and/or grooming mirror with blue leather slip-case, a set of his wings and a couple war-time aircraft recognition publications, as well as a MiG-21 armament panel and a cine-camera (16mm I believe) purportedly from a MiG-17. Space constrains aside, some day I'd like to acquire something substantial - for no sentimental reason whatsoever.
    Gentlemen, you can't fight in here, this is a war room!

  14. #44
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    May 2007
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    80
    I have the original Press Report from Headquarters Fighter Command advising that W/Cmdr Douglas Bader is missing from a recent daylight offensive over Northern France. I will post a pick when I get a minute. I have recently offered it to the RAF Museum at Hendon.

  15. #45
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    Apr 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, Aust
    Posts
    834

    Pilots Licence

    This is my second post but thought you might like it. My great aunts pilots licence, ground engineers licence and logbook, unfortunately WW2 put an end to her aviation career. First entry in logbook is 8/11/36 for 20 min in DH60 VH-UPU.
    Cheers Paul
    Last edited by ozjag; 29th September 2008 at 15:58.

  16. #46
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Overstrand
    Posts
    431
    I've got a cannon port and some panels from a Jag T2 that was being scrapped round about the time I was demobed and a suspiciously WW1 looking leather “flying helmet” and goggles from a flea market in Thame 10 years ago
    Królewska Moc Powietrza nie jest lot cyrku.....

  17. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan View Post
    I have the log book medals and various bits to F/Sgt Albert Oxley, the DFC and family archive of F/Lt Rolf Cardale Luck and the medals of F/O Douglas Cowan Moore. All purchased separately. The special bit? All were part of the same Catalina crew lost on a special duty op' in Burma Oct '44. (Still looking for the rest of the crew!)
    Stan,

    Just new on this forum. I am looking into the Roll of Honour of my old school here in Kenya. Records are fairly Spartan, and so have ended up casting a much larger net, which now includes the secondary schools in Kenya pre-WWII. Rolf Cardale Luck is very much one of those. He is doubly interesting as he was also Kenya Regiment, a unit that my father was in, in Abyssinia before transferring to the King African Rifles with whom he went to Burma.

    What was 'Operation Brown Owl' all about, and what do you know about his career?

    Best regards,


    Tom Lawrence

  18. #48
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    Feb 2017
    Posts
    2
    Dear Stan,

    I am researching all the Kenyans who were killed in WWII, and Rolf Cardale Luck was one of the them. The reason is that I hate this thing of long lists of rolls of Honour -they say nothing for the guys and who they were and have lesst character than a telephone directory might. What I am trying to do is put a wee bit of colour on each person. Would you be happy to share any information about this man, his family in Kenya, and information on what the lead up to his death?

    Many thanks,

  19. #49
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    Mar 2013
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    160
    The ailerons from CLA 4 G-EBPC.

  20. #50
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    Oct 2006
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    8,718
    My attestation docs and arrival docs for Swinditz plus my passing out photos, all of which I didn't know existed until clearing out my late mums house and all found she had saved them, strangely they mean more to me than the NI GSM medal I got, that lies in a drawer as just a useless bit of tin, I feel as an RAF bod in the safety of Aldergrove there were a lot more ( Army and aircrew) in more dire circumstances that earned that bit of tin more than I ever did..

    My memories of those gone, past and present from my service career, men and women in their prime of life taken far to early, one of my old Squadron facebook sites these days I do not enjoy logging in as it often informs me of another one gone to early.

  21. #51
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    Oct 2006
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    Kenya Pilot, I have sent Stan an email to let him know you are enquiring.

  22. #52
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    Sep 2003
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    uk
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    ww11 138 squadron log book, to a casualty sadly.

  23. #53
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    Jun 2014
    Location
    Cheltenham, Canada
    Posts
    86
    Probably the most interesting item in the hangar is the Mercedes D III aero engine dated March, 1917.

    A wee bit battered and bruised it certainly has an interesting history. Manufactured March 1917 and delivered to Albatros, it in all likely hood was installed in a D V (not Va) fighter. Factory built in high compression form it was rated at 170ps vs the standard 160ps. With the better known D IIIa engine being introduced in April, 1917, this was one of the last D III engines produced.

    While it's service history is currently unknown, it was on display as a War Trophy in the Ottawa Armouries (Canada) in June 1918 and is documented as part of a War Trophy tour across Canada that summer.

    At 15 litres (903cubic inches) and 600+ pounds, it is certainly a conversation starter.

    Unfortunately I am unable to upload a picture either as an attachment or insert.

    Regards,
    John

  24. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    367
    Hi

    My memorabilia are parts of the Stirling that crashed in a field and slid towards the small cottage where my Mother and Aunt (to be) were both asleep aged 12 and 8 having been evacuated from South London for 'safety'.

    50 yards more and I would not be typing this, sadly some parts belonged to the crew who all died.


    James
    Last edited by jamesinnewcastl; 18th May 2018 at 22:21.

  25. #55
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    210
    "most significant piece of memorabilia...that has sincere personal meaning to the individual"
    [op, nostalgair 2007]

    My father's RAF Observer's Flying Log Book . With loose mementoes (incl airframe aluminium foil sample and burnt parachute fragment, Blenheim I L8531 Greece 1941)

    The first photo album he and Mum put together. Includes the period from 1940 (when they met) to 1945 (their marriage).

    His medal set (1939-1945 Star, Africa Star, Defence Medal, War Medal). Never worn post-war.

    TH Wisdom Wings Over Olympus . Dad's original copy (incl his roll of 211 Squadron aircrew in 1941, plus text annotations & pasted in photos).

    Their war-time letters.

    I've chosen to omit the two other family items of "sincere personal meaning".

    CFR Clark 1916-2003, BR Clark née Hawkins 1921-2010.

    Don Clark
    www.211squadron.org

    Postscript
    While I've now edited out the more personal remarks from this post, I must thank Andrew (we're unrelated) for his kind comment, below.
    Last edited by DonClark; 22nd May 2018 at 00:20.

  26. #56
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    154
    A No.106 Squadron lapel pin from the early Eighties. It has no commercial value but means the earth to me as it was given to me by a group of veterans at one of the Squadron reunions. Lest we forget.....

  27. #57
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    Oct 2013
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    Surrey
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    154
    Don. I've just read you post, above. Thank you so much for posting it... Andrew

  28. #58
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    Jan 2008
    Location
    The Wirral
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    I've got a few bits and pieces of various sorts but this is my favourite.

    It's the stainless steel fitting that was the fixed part of the lock for the pilot's small side door (note the part number) of Spitfire Mk.1, R6891.

    The aircraft flew with 610 Squadron all through the Battle of Britain and it was in this aircraft that a certain Sgt Ronnie Fairfax "the Pied Piper" Hamlyn achieved five combat kills on the same day (all confirmed) during the Battle. He was, officially, the RAF's first "Ace in a Day" and later did a radio interview for the BBC about the feat.

    The part represents a small piece from one of the most important air battles ever and it is one of those parts, would that it could only speak. With canopy slid back and cockpit door open it would have sat there in the Kent sunshine at Hawkinge and Biggin Hill whilst the clatter of the armourers and refuellers and other station life went on around it. Likewise, during the air combats in which it was involved, it would have shaken and resounded to the eight Browning machine guns fired to achieve the victories - as well as all the other activity of the time. You can see the witness marks on it from when the catch was locked after the door was closed.

    It was found in the Northumbrian mud in 2001 whilst excavating what was left of the aircraft after it had crashed on high ground in a dive after the pilot (under training) had lost control in cloud. He baled out but, unfortunately, he was too low to survive.

    So it is a small, recognisable and identifable relic of a time when the war was far from won and of those many men and machines who fought to win that important battle in the long hot summer of 1940.

    Anon.

    I'm unable to add pics at the moment due to some problem or other. Will try again later.
    Last edited by Anon; 21st May 2018 at 19:23.

  29. #59
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    395
    My favorite aircraft part was an MOD plate from Ward's Wellington L7818. Donated the plate and other parts to the RNZAF a few years ago. better they have it.
    Ian

  30. #60
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Glorious Souffff
    Posts
    5,068
    Nice stuff Mike and Ian

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