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Thread: UH-1H (Dornier) Huey Tail

  1. #1
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    UH-1H (Dornier) Huey Tail

    This is the tail from a UH-1H that turned up this week.

    As far as I can ascertain-

    It was built by Dornier and called the UH-1D(Deutsche/Dornier) but built to the design of the UH-1H.

    Naming is confused with the earlier smaller engine/shorter tail UH-1D.

    Data plate says it was from construction number 8435.

    Heli database says that this construction number was HFR30 73+15 that flew for the Budeswehr Heer (Army).

    I am guessing it was sold at the Air and Ground sale as it is on a Harrier construction trolley.

    (Which might also explain how it ended up at a Blackpool reclamation yard that also has Lynx and Wessex parts).

    Not sure how it got to Britain.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Kind Regards,

    Brian

  2. #2
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    I think they were on a disposal / ebay website and there is an operator in the uk,maybe bought for spares recovery, there is a Merlin one for sale too at the moment.

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    I appreciate the chicken for scale.

  4. #4
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    Meddle Thats not any Chicken - that's Harriet..

    Couldn't find a 20 foot chicken to stand alongside it to show its length - but the perspective did not work in the picture..

    Tony, I had wondered if the Blackpool connection was related to one of the Hueys that flys out of Blackpool - but looking at their restoration pics I doubted it.

    It has been on sale on Ebay for a couple of years but direct contact with the supplier is always preferable...
    Kind Regards,

    Brian

  5. #5
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    Brian, The UH-1D and -1H have identical tailbooms as they both use the 48ft rotor system.

    There are two main differences between the D and the H.

    Engine model (-11A vs-13B) and location of the pitot (nose on the D, roof on the H).

    So the tailboom you have there can be used on either model.
    Graham Allan
    JP843 Propulsions/Systems Lead

    www.typhoonlegacy.com

  6. #6
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    Graham my apologies I was working from pics in books on Vietnam Nose Art. The B was the short body...
    Kind Regards,

    Brian

  7. #7
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    I understand the German built aircraft were to UH-1D, not "H" standard.
    As mentioned above, the primary difference is the "H" has an up-rated power plant producing 200 additional horsepower.
    So the "D" doesn't necessarily stand for "Dornier"...but it's a handy coincidence.

    The U.S. Army was keen to get the extra power for use in tropical Vietnam (many existing "D" models were upgraded), Germany, obviously much cooler, may have decided the extra power wasn't necessary.
    There are few, if any, airframe differences. Those differences are more likely engineering and production line changes brought about by field experience.
    Last edited by J Boyle; 23rd February 2018 at 21:27.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  8. #8
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    US UH-ID production stopped in '66, after that they were the more powerful H models

    German production started in '67, all German built UH-ID (Dornier) are H spec birds.

    allegedly.
    If anybody ever tells you anything about an aeroplane which is so bloody complicated you can't understand it, take it from me: It's all balls. RJM.

  9. #9
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    One might think so, but that's not what is reported in the Putnam series Bell book.

    If anyone has access to an authoritative book that says otherwise, I'd be interested in a definite answer.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  10. #10
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    All we'd need to settle it is something showing what engine is in the Dornier version. I was just going by what I was told at the local Huey ship last year when I noticed a row of Dornier booms laying in the yard. I looked on line yesterday but couldn't find a mention of the engine.

    The pics I can find of the Dornier version show the pitot on the roof, that's an H feature . US D(Delta) models had it on the snout.
    Last edited by ZRX61; 24th February 2018 at 22:20.
    If anybody ever tells you anything about an aeroplane which is so bloody complicated you can't understand it, take it from me: It's all balls. RJM.

  11. #11
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    The engines are:
    UH-1D: T53 L-11
    UH-1H: T53 L-13
    As far as the relocated pitot is concerned, that could have been a running change once it was determined that the nose location was subject to damage.
    While it might be the main identification feature between the two, I wouldn't wager much money on it.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  12. #12
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    Careful there too Plenty of short body UH-1's run the 48ft rotor system with the long tailboom. LOL.
    Graham Allan
    JP843 Propulsions/Systems Lead

    www.typhoonlegacy.com

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    Aren't they converted nowadays because of parts availability?

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    Couldn't find a 20 foot chicken to stand alongside it to show its length - but the perspective did not work in the picture..
    DHL might have been able to supply some.

    Thats where I saw it

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BELL-HUEY...p2047675.l2557

    As said he has lots of Lynx and others

    [https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/Aircraft-...salvage&_sac=1
    Last edited by TonyT; 26th February 2018 at 15:19.

  15. #15
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    I am not sure if this advances the discussion on model D vs model H - but image of the data plate on the tail.

    I know the Bell 205 is the Huey - but is the 200-008 model number relevant to the specific model ?


    P.S. why were they also called Slicks ?


    Tony - yes that is the same one.

    the German national flag on the tail and the code and cross on the boom have been solvent wiped .
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Kind Regards,

    Brian

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    Why were they called slicks?
    Look at a Huey gunship UH-1A,B,C,M (this is the so-called short Huey, one large window in the sliding door, etc).
    Compare one with all the guns and rocket pods hanging on them to a UH-1D,H,V with only a single M60 mg on each side and you can see why the term "slick" was used.
    When in RVN you normally used the word "guns" and "slicks" to define which kind of Huey was used/needed. Later during the RVN war D/H's replaced the B/C's as troop transports. B/C's stayed as gunships along with the AH-1G Cobras.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	UH-1D's Outlaw 23 & Tiger 822..13 CAB Ops...7 Mtns..June 1968.jpg 
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  17. #17
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    & C's were upgrade to M's

    C's are easy to identify, fuel filler is on the left side.
    If anybody ever tells you anything about an aeroplane which is so bloody complicated you can't understand it, take it from me: It's all balls. RJM.

  18. #18
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    If you want to run that part # on that data plate, all the manuals etc are here:

    https://www.uh1ops.com/uh-1-resources
    If anybody ever tells you anything about an aeroplane which is so bloody complicated you can't understand it, take it from me: It's all balls. RJM.

  19. #19
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    The BWB stamp above is the acceptance stamp of "Bundesamt für Wehrtechnik und Beschaffung - BWB" the federal military procurement office.

    Later H-model US-Hueys had their exhaust blowing upwards through "horns", while the Germans had straight out exhaust pipes towards the tail. Some chopper connaisseurs claim to hear the sound difference in flight.
    Last edited by Spitzfeuer; 27th February 2018 at 15:02.

  20. #20
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    Thanks to all for responses.

    I also now understand - slicks were troop carriers - not gunships.
    Kind Regards,

    Brian

  21. #21
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    Spitfeuer...
    Those exhaust pipes were a latter add-on modification added at the every end of Vietnam to counter SA-7 man portable SAMS.

    They were modifications and not a recognition feature for differentiating D's from H's.
    They were largely removed after leaving Vietnam. The last active duty H model Huey I saw did not have one.
    Needless to say, civil surplus military ships don't have them either.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  22. #22
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    The Exhaust Diffuser was just that, to spread out the hot exhaust air by directing it into the rotor wash.
    Because of its looks the Huey crews called it the "Toilet Bowl".
    Almost all the US Army Huey's in Germany had them installed once they were available and stayed on while in country.
    Also correct, the civilian Huey's don't use them. Perhaps not certified for civilian use? Even though if you look at some of the places they fly maybe a good idea!

    The Dornier built Huey's had many different cockpit instruments and cabin accessories compared to the US Army aircraft.

  23. #23
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    Didn't the Dornier built Huey's also have different Pylon panels? Solid as opposed to the honeycomb???
    Graham Allan
    JP843 Propulsions/Systems Lead

    www.typhoonlegacy.com

  24. #24
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    US Army Aviation H-Hueys in Berlin had those exhaust pipes.
    https://www.usarmygermany.com/Units/...%20Det%204.htm

    Final US-Hohenfels Hueys had them removed.
    https://www.google.de/search?q=Hohen...Xmv_D2V2fIn4M:
    Last edited by Spitzfeuer; 28th February 2018 at 14:35.

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