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Thread: 13 Hours that saved Britain (documentary)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    510

    13 Hours that saved Britain (documentary)

    Might have been seen by many before, but it has some interesting shots from Battle of Britain incorporated, with some 'unused' footage

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmjKODQYYfg


    Regards,


    Chris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    31
    I've seen quite a lot of unused footage from "Battle Of Britain" now and I have to say that a lot of it, had it been used in the final cut, I personally feel would have greatly enhanced the dynamics of the dogfights. Specifically the fighter vs fighter duels. This isn't meant as criticism by any means. It's just that I watch these out takes and I think "Wow! Wish they'd used that bit".

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    7

    Out takes

    The reason they are out takes is because the film editor and director discovered that each of those particular shots did not drive forward the narrative or understanding of a particular sequence, and/or would not 'cut in' (i.e. blend in) with the preceding or following shot. This fine-tuning sees off many great images in all types of film-making. Be glad they got some exposure (albeit clunky, at times) elsewhere.
    Robert Arley, Of sons and skies

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Grantown on Spey
    Posts
    2,601
    The clarity of film from the Bof B in that u tube docu is surprisingly good. In relation to its content i have just read Gun Button to fire by Tom Neil..revised edition. He flew Hurricanes in the battle and laments the poor co ordination of the control. Many times he flew with several formations of his squadron and failed to be guided to any enemy aircraft. Has the portrayal of radar as an important plus factor in the battle been exagerrated? Or were flights of fighters sent to patrol set lines just in the hope that they would be in the right place to intercept when an attack came over the channel? Perhaps the powers that be had little confidence in the radar and fell back on reliance of the idea of a standing patrol.?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    7
    The value of radar at the time of the B of B has been vastly exaggerated in places. British radio direction finding was very crude and limited at this stage in the war. Wobbly flickers on cathode ray screens, unable to distinguish friend from foe. Mercifully we had good management of vigorous airmen, sufficient to rattle Hitler's invasion ambitions. But once the Luftwaffe commenced night-time blitz raids, there was no effective means of deterrence.
    Robert Arley, Of sons and skies

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