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Thread: A Wetish Walkabout In London ~ 27Jan18

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    A Wetish Walkabout In London ~ 27Jan18

    After all the night shoots around London I thought it was about time I did a day shoot and rather than wait for blue sky and sunshine, which is preferable, I’d give it a go when it was cloudy and raining and see what I could come up with. On Saturday the weather gods duly obliged with wall to wall cloud although the rain, which fortunately was light and not a heavy downpour, did arrive slightly later than advertised. I had a wander south of the river one or two streets back from the Thames to see if there was anything interesting to pick up along the way and then up to King’s Cross, not the station, and into St Pancras station.

    A Greek Doric style portico fronting 57 Stamford Street was once the entrance to the Unitarian Chapel that was built in 1821. The Portico of the Unitarian Chapel was Grade II listed in March 1950 and the Chapel itself was demolished in 1964. The Portico is now the entrance to the modern flats behind.


    At the entrance to the Mondrian Hotel in the Sea Containers Building is a sculpture of an anchor chain against a representation of a copper bottomed hull, as used on the Cutty Sark transatlantic sailing ship, that continues into the hotel lobby.


    76-80 Southwark Street dates from 2001 and is a renovation of 3 buildings with the upper floors canting out over Southwark Street.


    The Menier Chocolate Factory was once a factory making chocolate set up by the French Menier Chocolate Company when they expanded their business overseas and opened in 1874. The building was Grade II Listed in 1996 and the Chocolate Factory is now the home of a 180-seat Theatre.


    After 5 years of major redevelopment work, London Bridge Station has emerged from its cocoon of scaffolding and the old pedestrian walkway linking the underground station with the new concourse of London Bridge railway station has been given a makeover with a new vaulted ceiling.


    View looking, in the rain that finally arrived, from More London Riverside towards Tower Bridge with City Hall in the foreground.


    ‘Word on the Water’ floating Library moored at Regent’s Canal Towpath, King’s Cross.


    Just a stone’s throw to the north of King’s Cross and St Pancras railway station's, York Road is a disused underground station that opened in 1906 on the then Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) which later became the Piccadilly line. Due to its location it had very few commuters stopping off at it and in 1932 was permanently closed due to lack of use.


    Selfie in the rain in one of Gasholder No. 8’s many polished stainless steel uprights supporting the circular canopy over the footpath.


    A very small part of Google’s massive 11-storey London headquarters at 6 Pancras Square, King’s Cross.


    A view from inside St Pancras International across Pancras Road to King’s Cross railway station.


    The Dent clock, a reproduction of the original which was dropped and smashed when being taken down in the 1970’s, hangs from the framework of the south elevation of St Pancras station.


    Beneath the Dent clock is the 9m tall bronze statue of a sculpture by Paul Day known as ‘The Lovers’.


    View looking north of part of the 100ft high, 240ft wide and 700ft long wrought iron canopy which was the largest single spanned roof in the world when the station opened in 1868.


    Opened in 1852, King’s Cross railway station frontage was restored in 2014 after the removal of the 1972 extension.


    And as it was getting dark and I wasn't doing a night shoot, I got the next train back to Cambridge.

    Sony RX1R II - Hand held, manual settings, uncompressed RAW.

    Brian
    The Future Of Photography Is Mirrorless

    DUXFORDfotoGALLERY
    DfG on Facebook

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    East Sussex, UK
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    1,090
    Brian,

    Another excellent set of photos - I enjoy your takes on the places and details so many people probably walk past every day without ever actually 'seeing' them. Your eye for detail or the 'unusual' makes so many of the photos taken in your London bimbles so different to the predictable, repetitive, 'I was here' tourist snapshots that crop up on the social media platforms.

    Places like the London Stations are, for so many people, simply a place they pass through, in a hurry, on their way somewhere else - you show them to be places worthy of a little time spent looking at their unique features.


    Keep up the good work!

    Paul F

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    St Ives, cambs
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    2,506
    Paul

    My first job on leaving school was to train as an Architectural Technician and 40 odd years later I still have an interest in buildings, which is why they feature a lot, and I probably look at them with a different mind set to non architecturally trained members of the public.

    I actually have a virtual bimble around the area I'm interested in on Google maps in 3D before I set out. Unfortunately images used on Google maps appear about about 5 years out of date as I come across a building on Google that looks interesting and when I get to the location, it's demolished and something new is in its place.

    Off into the City tomorrow and I've seen some interesting buildings and locations around London Liverpool Street Station on my virtual walkabout. Just hope they are still there.

    Brian
    The Future Of Photography Is Mirrorless

    DUXFORDfotoGALLERY
    DfG on Facebook

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