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Thread: Just Jane Restoration Work Begins

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by wes View Post
    I visited Duxford on Sunday to see the BBMF Lancaster, and for the first time noticed either a masking tape or a painted stripe on all the fuselage joints, although the fuz is still together.

    Just quickly checked a few pics, and can't see that they've always been there.

    The other paint looks intact, maybe they are re-applying the fabric strips?
    In the 90's at Biggin Hill I can remember the BBMF Lanc landed, taxied and parked up.
    The crew then exited the aircraft and one of the ground crew did a quick check. There was a long fabric strip
    dangling down from one of the sides, bomb doors.
    So is fabric used as a fairing on some of the Lancs joins, joints?

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by hampden98 View Post
    So is fabric used as a fairing on some of the Lancs joins, joints?

    See http://www.mission4today.com/index.p...wtopic&t=14429

    and scroll down for the famouus Charles E Brown photo of the Lancaster on test from Castle Bromwich showing the extent of fabricked joins.

  3. #63
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    Just so we're clear on this. If you don't find anything serious it will fly after this work?
    Give a man a fish and eat for a day. Give a man a fishing rod and he'll eat for a lifetime. Give a man religion and he'll die praying for a fish!

  4. #64
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    Not quite. This survey produces the list of work to do in order to restore her. If nothing or note had been found on the inspection then she could have had the airframe made airworthy but unfortunately there has been too much work to complete this winter

  5. #65
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    Thanks very much for the reply!
    Give a man a fish and eat for a day. Give a man a fishing rod and he'll eat for a lifetime. Give a man religion and he'll die praying for a fish!

  6. #66
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    What wonderful pics in that attachment !

  7. #67
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    The 2017 winter restoration work for Avro Lancaster NX611 has just started-
    http://www.lincsaviation.co.uk/news/...ation-2017.htm

  8. #68
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    Great to see the progress in maintenance to airworthy.

  9. #69
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    Out of interest, when the restoration is complete and she gets back in the air, will flights
    be on offer as a fundraiser ?
    Engine Failure:.... A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air.

  10. #70
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    Under current CAA rules we are not able to offer passenger flights. However through our discussions with the CAA about the project it has not been ruled out as a possibility.

  11. #71
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    They might insist on the fitting of a steel cockpit door and escape slides!

    Richard
    "Where are you from?"
    "America" Somebody laughed politely.

  12. #72
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    Thanks for reply.
    I only ask as I believe the Canadian Lancaster uses passenger flights as a fund raiser. Something they also did here in 2014 ?
    Engine Failure:.... A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air.

  13. #73
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    Restoration tour dates have been released here, see the work close up and find out whats happening this winter with NX611- http://www.lincsaviation.co.uk/store...oration-tours/

  14. #74
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    Video of the restoration work under way this Winter.
    Found on YouTube.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHoWbv2Z68g
    mmitch.

  15. #75
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    Great update and you can see a lot of work is needed before she will be fit for flight but its all heading in the right direction and in the right hands
    Also good to see no Hard hat or HiVi in sight
    Last edited by Trolly Aux; 3rd December 2017 at 13:51.
    SMOKE SMOKE GO!
    TA out

  16. #76
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    Excellent video!
    Andy

  17. #77
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    Rather surprised at the method used to remove rivets. One handed, large drill (too big?), straight through.

    That has got to be storing up a lot of problems for later.

  18. #78
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    There's a reason they make drill stops

    arrgghh! I just saw the hammer & gasket scraper method used later in the video. Now someone will need to inspect the ribs to see how many formerly round holes are now oval & how many cracks he *installed*...
    Last edited by ZRX61; 4th December 2017 at 22:27.
    If anybody ever tells you anything about an aeroplane which is so bloody complicated you can't understand it, take it from me: It's all balls. RJM.

  19. #79
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    Thank you for your concern. The pop rivets in the trailing edge inspection panels had the centres drilled out without damage to the structure. The rudder and fins had the rivets drilled and removed without damage to the structure. The only damage we have found is from work done to her in the 50s and 60s during 'in field' repairs.
    The gents doing the work also work on many of the airliners you fly in so if you're concerned i'd suggest you only book holidays in the UK from now on

  20. #80
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    Maybe the aircraft is being restored to"static only" condition.
    Now officially a 'Senior Citizen'

  21. #81
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    Theres far too much money being invested for that to be the case! I think intentions have been made clear and all this work is leading to that end.

  22. #82
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    Great video, and thanks for sharing. It is great to see the work being recorded too.

  23. #83
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    The gents doing the work also work on many of the airliners you fly in so if you're concerned ...
    Structural repair work is something of a specialist skill, and being so is not a task that is undertaken every day by tradesmen. What I have seen in the video posted is not the correct way to remove rivets. Only the head should be drilled off. Drilling all the way through (as in the video) is also inparting a twist and thus making an oval hole.

    I am not going to get into any further discussion because it is not worth trying to argue black v white. However, plenty of discussion (horror stories) online by fellow ‘sheeties’ that make interesting reading regarding the abilities of those who’s day job is working on airplanes when faced with structural repairs.

  24. #84
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    I've never worked on aircraft, but if I were to be allowed to, unsupervised, would it be correct to firstly find a drill bit that matches the rivet shank (Zeus book handy here) Remove the just the head (it should slide up the bit like a washer) using minimum pressure to avoid distortion, then press out the remainder of the rivet by hand, if it doesn't just drop out. The intention always to maintain as much original metal to the sheet as when it was originally manufactured.

  25. #85
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    What I was taught at QANTAS as well.Drill off head and lightly punch out tail with pin punch..Great fun doing steel rivets in aluminium spars.
    "If the C.O. ask's you to be Tail End Charlie...just shoot him!!!....A Piece of Cake.
    http://spitfirea58-27.blogspot.com.au/

  26. #86
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    I'm also interested to learn. Does the recommended technique depend on whether the original skin is going to be re-used on the existing structure, or whether a new skin is going to be fitted to the underlying structure?
    Andy

  27. #87
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    I have observed many different ways of doing the same job - I was taught to take just the head off, then punch through - but with age and experience comes confidence, and I would be prepared to bet there are few, if any issues with the holes in the underlying structure. I don't think Andrew would be employing these guys if they were wrecking his aeroplane!

  28. #88
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    Ok, can we concentrate again on the fine work on NX611 being done. Perhaps start a new thread regarding how not to do the work to prevent congesting this topic.
    cheers
    Cees

  29. #89
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    None of the skins are being reused im afraid due to corrosion, cracks, oversized rivets or all of the above. The trailing edge panels are having the pops replaced with anchor nut channel and screws.
    The survey last year has given the knowledge about what can be/needs to be saved and what doesnt. We are now in the process of surveying the ribs and structure within the fin and rudder. Sadly by the very nature of the way they have been built there are several 'figure of 8' holes where the ribs have been tack riveted to the trailing edge and then the skin riveted on with the same spacings.
    Ironically the brand new rudder and fin off the production line is instantly unserviceable!
    NB The normal method used for the pop rivet removal is to knock out the stem, drill through to enable the head to be removed and then knock out the tail. What we've found is a variety of steel and alluminium stems creating issues and the obligitary spinning pops.

  30. #90
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    Andrew, thanks for that insight. I've no practical experience on aircraft 'metal-bashing', my career was in systems engineering on FBW flight control systems, so it's fascinating to learn about other facets of aircraft build and repair.
    Andy

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