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Thread: Let's bring back the Stuntman

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orion View Post

    Sorry but again we are at odds.
    No need for apologies. You'd be happy riding AF447 with its 'unimaginative' crew down to the ocean and below, I'd be happy sitting behind Chesley Sullenberger heading for the Hudson.

    We all have different ways of enjoying our flying.

    Moggy
    "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moggy C View Post
    No need for apologies. You'd be happy riding AF447 with its 'unimaginative' crew down to the ocean and below, I'd be happy sitting behind Chesley Sullenberger heading for the Hudson.

    We all have different ways of enjoying our flying.

    Moggy
    A cheap shot, thoroughly unpleasant. I think I'll stop posting here, goodbye
    David Mylchreest
    Steam and Model Railway videos http://www.youtube.com/user/PenrithBeacon
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  3. #33
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    Not a cheap shot at all.

    Simply the whole essence of the discussion.

    Moggy
    Last edited by Moggy C; 11th April 2015 at 08:16.
    "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

  4. #34
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    I would myself be anyday in a pax seat knowing there was a Sully in the Left Seat.

    Licensed to fly the aircraft not simply a computer.
    Jay

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomcatViP View Post
    Thinking more into the concept, I think a flying flight simulator could come around easily. Systems emulation, adaptive control laws and virtual trafic are now notions that won't afraid anybody anymore speaking about it. The new key is now to have a low kinetic "situation" simulator to emulate the most hairy critical situations that a pilot now must have to be trained to deal with.

    With crash safety design solutions and some other new minded approach, it should be possible to have a safe enough plane offering high sink rate and able to emulate the experience of a deep stall, a flat spin or a crash landing with enough safety and acceleration control to have an Instructor on-board teaching and screening several dozen of trainee at a low cost (before he had seen enough and decide to move on).

    This kind of flying kinetic simulator (fitted with the above described virtual rendering systems (trafic, FCS systems and ctrl laws)) could be part of a mandatory session to all trainee with refreshing cursus in place for experienced aircrew.

    It's easy to foresee an economic model around it with the design fulfilling an international RFP (ICAO for example) and the plane being bought by individuals or structures renting hours to companies or professional flying school (just like the NATO's pilot training system in place).

    With such a tool, sensations could be safely introduced in the cursus, adding a new dimension to the training that will bring in a much needed awareness for the pilots encountering a critical situation.
    Low kinetics is the necessary variable to emulate safely on a regular basis an abrupt flight departing, a high pitch rate (periodic or pulsed), a high drifting angle, a high sink rate and, of course, the most dairying crash landing training.

    With such a tool (and added hardware), we can even envision to train (via flying simulator as opposed ti ground based one) for landing on forest canopy, crash landing at sea, take off and landing in icy/ or heavy snow conditions, extreme cross wind landing and of course, power-off approach (tracting engine at full power for safety - not even at idle).
    NASA Brings Fused Reality Simulation Into Cockpit

    NASA also wanted to evaluate use of Fused Reality for a landing task requiring a high glide angle to touchdown. This could not be tested using NASA’s F/A-18 because the aircraft would not be able to arrest its descent rate fast enough to recover. “We could simulate a runway at 5,000 ft. above ground level and fly a very steep approach to touchdown. The aircraft would flare to touchdown and fly through the virtual runway, but that was OK,”
    Here we are... now where is my low kinetics flying mule?

    Source:
    AviationWeek.com

  6. #36
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    Flight EK521 go-around incident (plane destroyed) points to pilot overload

    Just 10s elapsed between the sounding of a cockpit alarm, which appears to have triggered the aborted landing, and the retraction of the undercarriage.
    [...]
    Destruction of Emirates flight EK521 might also add a further twist to the complexity of training pilots to handle such events effectively. If the cockpit alarm, warning of a long landing, proves to have been the trigger event for the go-around, investigators will have to explore the decision process that led the crew to abort touchdown when some 3km of runway remained.

    Source:
    FlightGlobal.com
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 10th September 2016 at 23:49.

  7. #37
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    Thales outlines digital tranformation avionics

    Examples of new functions include recommendations for optimal altitudes, weather rerouting, and turbulence and air-traffic-delay avoidance. Given that new aircraft already have advanced displays, secure connectivity to the ground and digital links to air traffic control, Thales is pursuing methods to take available data and package it in a way that helps a pilot make the best decisions. “That’s the next phase,” Pellegrini said, adding the improvements can be done incrementally, without waiting for the next clean-sheet aircraft design.

    “What we’re seeing is significant disruption in many industries due to the exponential progress in Big Data, machine learning and connectivity,” he said. “The classic example is automated cars.” He noted that some automotive technologies, including the linking of information from various sources, can apply to aviation.

    In that context, information from air traffic control, airport ground systems and other nontraditional sources, for example, can be fed into data analytics and artificial intelligence algorithms to provide airlines and pilots with “significant advances in operating their aircraft more efficiently,” he said.

    Source:
    AviationWeek.com

  8. #38
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  9. #39
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    Autonomous Helicopters Seen as Wave of the Future


    The Matrix algorithms and flight control system can also operate aircraft more efficiently than human pilots, Van Buiten said. Even seasoned air crews introduce extraneous inputs into platforms during operations, he explained. The super computer cuts down on those and can manage the onset of loads on a helicopter by making calculations and moving the controls in fractions of a second.
    That has implications for sustainment.
    “When we have the computer fly the airplane it can … reduce the wear and tear on the components pretty significantly, so that’s direct cost reduction,” he said.
    The system can also be used when human pilots are on board the aircraft, he noted. In addition to enabling autonomous flight, it can be used to assist one-man or two-man air crews.
    It gets clearer day after day now: the pilot (or should we talk about manned piloting?) is heading to be exclusively an "out of the loop" situation manager.


    Source (as sourced from The secret Projects forum):
    The national Defense magazine.org
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 24th February 2018 at 23:45.

  10. #40
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    ‘Nerves of steel’: She calmly landed the Southwest flight, just as you’d expect of a former fighter pilot

    And sourced from UPI.com:
    Emergency alarms on the plane acted properly and the plane rolled at a severe 41-degree angle after the left engine failed, he said. He also noted "a fair amount of vibration" and said the airliner landed in Philadelphia at an above-average speed of 190 mph.
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 19th April 2018 at 17:23.

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