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Thread: Turkish aerospace

  1. #541
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    Indeed. Perhaps ifthe TFX thread ban hadnt been put in place at the beginning, we wouldnt have to trawl through all the PR to read what we are interested in?

  2. #542
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    Guys I was restricted to putting all Turkish Aerospace updates into one thread hence why the posts are very sporadic.

    There are so many developments such as turbo-fan, turbo-shaft engine development, radar development, missile propulsion development, helicopter development etc that I cannot fit into other threads. I try desperately and sometimes with little success in categorising them due to the restrictions imposed.

    Now, with respect to the TF-X it really needs a thread of its own but everyone opposed this at the onset. It is a somewhat mature project with initial conceptual design phases now completed. The United Kingdom has even already issued export licences and re-located engineering teams to Turkey. So I really don't know why we have no TF-X dedicated thread.
    Last edited by Bayar; 6th August 2017 at 11:18.

  3. #543
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    Guys I was restricted to putting all Turkish Aerospace updates into one thread hence why the posts are very sporadic.

    There are so many developments such as turbo-fan, turbo-shaft engine development, radar development, missile propulsion development, helicopter development etc that I cannot fit into other threads. I try desperately and sometimes with little success in categorising them due to the restrictions imposed.

    Now, with respect to the TF-X it really needs a thread of its own but everyone opposed this at the onset. It is a somewhat mature project with initial conceptual design phases now completed. The United Kingdom has even already issued export licences and re-located engineering teams to Turkey. So I really don't know why we have no TF-X dedicated thread.
    Agreed ... I have to admit esp. since I was one of these critics! Times have changed.

    So I would suggest: go ahead and I will support that.

    Otherwise I hope You do not get me wrong: Please post anything on engines and other minor projects here and it would be fine to start a new dedicated Turkish-naval and a thread on Turkish- radar and missiles but then in the other sections !

    Deino
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    He was my North, my South, my East and West,
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    My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
    I thought that love would last forever; I was wrong.

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    Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
    Pour away the ocean and sweep up the woods:
    For nothing now can ever come to any good.
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  4. #544
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    Further details on transfer of technology from Sikorsky to Turkish Aerospace Industries under the Turkish Utility Helicopter Program.


    Turkish Utility Helicopter Program – An Industrial Partnership Expected to Span at Least 3 Decades
    http://www.defenceturkey.com/en/cont...6#.WYhLWzOB3Vp

    Mr. Jason Lambert, Program Director - Turkish Utility Helicopter Program Sikorsky, a Lockheed Martin Company elaborate upon the latest information on the TUHP program and collaboration for Turkish partners

    Defence Turkey: Mr. Jason Lambert, first of all we would like to thank you for your time. The contract signed between the Undersecretariat for Defense Industries (SSM) and TAI and the main sub-contractor Sikorsky and other domestic sub-contractors within the scope of the General Purpose Helicopter Program officially entered into force in June 2016 upon the completion of the efforts for USA’s export licenses. The official launch of the contract was behind the planned schedule. What was the cause of this delay? Could you briefly assess this process?

    Thank you for the opportunity to discuss the program. The Turkish Utility Helicopter Program (TUHP) will establish the Turkish Defense Industry as a global leader in Rotorcraft production given the unpreceded volume of technology that will be transferred to Turkey. You are correct that the official launch of the Program was delayed beyond the initial anticipated schedule. Given the TUHP scope and strategic importance, both the U.S. Government and the Turkish Government provided a significant level of oversight to ensure that the Export Licenses were structured in a manner to enable the full execution of the Program. I am pleased to say that the collaboration between the U.S. Government, Turkish Government and Sikorsky ensured that we obtained the export licenses to successfully launch the program in June 2016. These licenses will serve as the foundation for our industrial partnership which will last for at least three decades.

    Defence Turkey: Dear Mr. Lambert, what will be the differences between T70 configurations which will be manufactured for Turkey and the S-70 model? Could you please inform us on the configurations that will be procured by Turkey?

    The T70 helicopter will be a variant of Sikorsky’s S-70i Black Hawk helicopter. As the prime contractor, TAI will manufacture the T70 aircraft under a license agreement with Sikorsky. TAI will customize the T70 helicopter in two configurations, utility, and firefighting for use by six Turkish end users. Additionally, TAI will also manufacture the S-70i Black Hawk for export sale by Sikorsky to the international market.

    Defence Turkey: The delivery of the 109-piece lot was planned to be completed within a 10 year period. Could you please share with us the latest updates regarding the delivery of the first helicopter as well as regarding the subsequent deliveries?


    The TUHP contracted delivery schedule is subject to the successful completion of several conditions, one of which was securing export licenses. These conditions were successfully fulfilled in June 2016, launching the delivery calendar for the Program. To initiate the development and production of the T70, Sikorsky delivered over 185,000 pages of technical data to TAI, on-time in Q4 2016. Additionally, in Q1 2018, Sikorsky will deliver the initial kit of T70 component parts to TAI for use in the Final Assembly of T70 #1 which will begin production in Q2 2018. The first T70 helicopter is scheduled for delivery in 2021 with the 109th unit scheduled for delivery in 2026.

    Defence Turkey: Turkey’s demand for T70 Utility Helicopters was identified as 300 for the following 20 year period and a consensus was reached between the parties on the procurement of 109 + 191 optional helicopters to this end. What kind of a plan is on the table regarding the utilization of the other 191-piece lot which will be procured optionally in addition to the 109-piece lot? Could you inform us on the latest developments?

    You are correct that the initial procurement and current program of record is for 109 T70 helicopters and that options exist for an additional 191 units. TAI is licensed by Sikorsky for production for a total of 300 T70 units (109+191). Should SSM decide to procure optional T70 aircraft, these options would be added to the current program of record.

    Defence Turkey: According to the contract of TUHP and in line with the requirements of the institutions in Turkey, Sikorsky committed to manufacture a helicopter at TAI facilities in return for each built helicopter and to export every helicopter produced in Turkey. Within such a framework, which type of a business model will come out between the parties regarding the export of the S-70i model to third countries? On the other hand, the initial amount of helicopters to be exported was 300, is an increase in this figure possible?


    Under TUHP, for every T70 helicopter that TAI assembles for the Turkish end users, TAI will also assemble an S-70i helicopter that Sikorsky will purchase from TAI for Sikorsky to sell to the international market. Sikorsky and TAI will partner together to identify export markets for these helicopters. At present, the initial number of helicopters to be exported is 109 units however, that number could reach as high as 300 units depending on the T70 options exercised by SSM.

    Defence Turkey: Could you also please inform us on the studies conducted and plans built regarding the production line to be established at TAI facilities?

    TAI has built a world-class assembly facility that will be used to produce the T70 and S-70i helicopters. In preparation for the start of T70 production, Sikorsky has been providing Technical Training and Technical Assistance to TAI in the areas of Manufacturing and Engineering. Our support will continue throughout TAI’s production of the T70.

    Defence Turkey: What would you like to say on the responsibilities and business portions of the main contractors and sub-contractors in the development, production and integration processes?

    TAI, as the prime contractor, will perform the final assembly, customization, and flight test for each T70 aircraft. Additionally, TAI also will manufacture the helicopter fuselage, empennage, and composite rotor blades.

    Sikorsky is the main subcontractor to TAI, delivering the technical data, technical training, technical assistance, aftermarket support, and helicopter components in the form of Kits to enable TAI to build the T70 helicopter based on the S-70i Black Hawk platform.

    Sikorsky is also collaborating with Aselsan on the development of a new avionics suite for the T70 known as the Integrated Modular Avionics System (IMAS). IMAS is a collaborative design by Aselsan, Sikorsky, TAI and pilots serving the Turkish Armed Forces to meet the requirements of Turkish T70 operators and other potential customers. This enhanced digital cockpit will provide Turkish pilots with powerful smart displays, point-and-click functionality to speed input of pilot commands, and ergonomic enhancements to the Pilot Vehicle Interface that will reduce pilot workload. Navigational improvements tailored to Turkish requirements will include an integrated Terrain Avoidance Warning System, an integrated advanced digital map, and coupled flight control functions for guided approaches to landing zones. As you may know, in March 2017, Sikorsky transferred to Aselsan an S-70i helicopter, which was built by our PZL Mielec factory in Poland. This helicopter will be used as the prototype for the integration, test and qualification of the IMAS. After the qualification of the cockpit, Sikorsky will deliver this Prototype helicopter to TAI.

    Alp Aviation will perform precision machining of the T70 helicopter’s dynamic components, mechanical flight controls, transmissions and landing gear assemblies.

    TEI will build the engines for the T70 under license from General Electric.


    Defence Turkey: Which type of a plan is envisaged to increase the domestic participation level aimed for the initial 5 helicopter lot to be delivered by you and the deliveries which will follow?

    For the first five T70 helicopters, Sikorsky will provide kits of aircraft components to TAI for Final Assembly. Over time, as TAI and Turkish Industry increase their capabilities to produce the components, Sikorsky’s kit content will decrease and the percentage of Turkish manufactured components will increase. Our collective production schedule outlines the Turkish industry phase-in timing for the various T70 components.

    Defence Turkey: What are your comments on the transformation of the active cooperation within the scope of the program built with the domestic sub-contractor companies into potential cooperation in other programs in the medium and long term?

    When SSM developed the concept for the Turkish Utility Helicopter Program, a principal objective was to increase capability of the Turkish Aerospace & Defense industry. Sikorsky’s industrialization proposal met this expectation and we are proud to partner with the Turkish companies to develop a world class rotorcraft industry here in Turkey for the production of the T70 and S-70i. This effort is a true international industrial partnership that will set the foundation for the future. For example, in March of this year, TAI announced our recent agreement to produce airframe components for Sikorsky; and here at IDEF, we are announcing an agreement with Alp Aviation which will become the first international supplier of main landing gear assemblies for Black Hawk helicopters. These are just two examples of recent cooperation and I am confident that there will be many more examples to come in the years ahead.

    Defence Turkey: Lastly, is there a message you would like to convey to the readers of Defence Turkey Magazine?

    Sikorsky is now a Lockheed Martin company, following the purchase of our organization in November 2015. Since that time, the integration of the two companies has progressed very smoothly. I am very pleased to say that the TUHP program has the full support of Lockheed Martin senior leadership.

    Additionally, the integration of Sikorsky within Lockheed Martin is also good news for the Black Hawk platform as we are looking to integrate different types of sensors, systems and weapons produced by Lockheed Martin. Those benefits will become increasingly evident in the years ahead as the Black Hawk helicopter becomes even more capable and takes on new missions
    Last edited by Bayar; 7th August 2017 at 12:24.

  5. #545
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    I think once Turkey goes on full anti-west and firmly aligns itself in the Russo-China sphere (its taken significant steps in that direction).
    we can start seeing reduced interactions between European and American companies.
    I'm more interested on what Turkey can gain out of cooperating with Sukhoi, Mil, Chengdu, etc.

  6. #546
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    @Y-20 Bacon, I agree with that assessment. However, I don't believe Turkey will align itself with the Russo-China sphere overtly within the next 5 years time. It will happen gradually and at an extremely slow pace.

    In any event we can view the most recent cooperation with European and American companies as an incentive of keeping Turkey within the NATO/Western fold. However, Western/European support for Kurdish Statehood under YPG leadership in Northern Syria will ultimately result in Turkey joining the Russo-China sphere- it effectively has no choice. Once Kurdish Statehood under YPG leadership occurs Turkey knows that the US/NATO will no longer need Turkey in the region. Hence, why Turkey is taking bold moves to prevent this at all costs.

    I think this would be alarming many in Brussels of late in any event: http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/...r-weapon-fears
    Last edited by Bayar; 9th August 2017 at 08:58.

  7. #547
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    don't put too much ideology in it. It's money first. The end result being that if things turn ugly, cooperation might be called-off. That's simple as that.
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 9th August 2017 at 10:02.

  8. #548
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    @TomcatViP, procurement of big ticket items always have a political dimension. The source you procure arms from ultimately reflects your political leanings and alliances (interpolarity etc). Procurement of S-400 Air Defense Systems and holding back-door negotiations on co-development of a fighter with Russia at the very least hint that Turkey may lean towards the China-Russia sphere. But only time will tell because Turkey also has purchased Russian arms in back the 1990's when it was heavily involved with NATO. It remains to be seen whether the Turkey-NATO/US/Germany spat is of a wider political realignment or a temporary dispute amongst friends.
    Last edited by Bayar; 9th August 2017 at 11:31.

  9. #549
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    I think once Turkey goes on full anti-west and firmly aligns itself in the Russo-China sphere (its taken significant steps in that direction).
    They wont.

  10. #550
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    Spending quite a bit of time in Ankara over the last three years, I'd say they lean to where the money is. As the glamour of the Western Empire is less bright these days, and there is a star rising in the East they hedge their bets and carefully start playing with the other side more openly and more substantially. That's basically the case in the Gulf area as well. Ideology is nice, and I count religion into that as well, but money talks and is in the end the dominating factor of where someone leans here; there are very very few naturally and stable alliances and loyalties. But of course, the U.S. is just one seriously lost war away from getting gleefully kicked out of the region, as there are many scores to settle from over the past 100 years. There is no "fealty" here beyond what pure violence and Greenbacks can effect.

  11. #551
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    as there are many scores to settle from over the past 100 years.
    You are making a confusion with the old colonial empire which from the USA ran off. I would suggest you read a bit on the subject.

  12. #552
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    They wont.
    Turkey will have little choice but to follow Russia unless it want to get self destruct.
    Turkey principal investor Qatar is basically 100% depended on Iran. and Iranian oil/gas production will increase at rapid rate. it means more wars and more expensive US weopon exports to Middleast and less money for investments.
    and Russia in next 2 years will have all the capability to implement to most effective air and sea embargo Middleast.
    Once Merkel sees that EU and especially France is unable to attract any further investments. that will be the end of any kind of EU wide military projects.

  13. #553
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    And you might want to travel, live and do business in the area a bit ;-)
    "Distiller ... arrogant, ruthless, and by all reports (including his own) utterly charming"

  14. #554
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    Turkish Aerospace Industries CEO Temel KOTIL gives us further interesting information regarding the TF-X program:

    The TF-X will be a supersonic air superiority fighter;

    Turkish Aerospace Industries is hiring 10,000 more engineers to assist with engineering; The engineers will come from both Turkey and abroad;

    BAE Systems has relocated its Panavia Tornado engineering team to Turkey under the TF-X program.

    TF-X may come in be both manned and un-manned version.
    Last edited by Bayar; 28th August 2017 at 07:59.

  15. #555
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    ...Turkish Aerospace Industries is hiring 10,000 more engineers to assist with engineering; The engineers will come from both Turkey and abroad;
    10,000 !!!! And how long does it take to check their political background in order to be sure that they fit the political cleansing and are not followers of Gülen ?

    When you consider how many state officials / civil servants and academics have fallen victim to this purge, I can hardly imagine that it will be easy to find "politically"-correct or -conformal engineers in this figure in Turkey, or at least quickly to find.
    ...

    He was my North, my South, my East and West,
    My working week and my Sunday rest,
    My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
    I thought that love would last forever; I was wrong.

    The stars are not wanted now; put out every one:
    Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
    Pour away the ocean and sweep up the woods:
    For nothing now can ever come to any good.
    -------------------------------------------------
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  16. #556
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    ....and the fact it will be a supersonic fighter is hardly worth the energy of typing is it? Everyone and their uncle says their future project 'may include unmanned variants' these days.

  17. #557
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bayar View Post
    Turkish Aerospace Industries CEO Temel KOTIL gives us further interesting information regarding the TF-X program:

    The TF-X will be a supersonic air superiority fighter;

    Turkish Aerospace Industries is hiring 10,000 more engineers to assist with engineering; The engineers will come from both Turkey and abroad;

    BAE Systems has relocated its Panavia Tornado engineering team to Turkey under the TF-X program.

    TF-X may come in be both manned and un-manned version.
    Firstly, may we have a source, even in Turkish.
    Secondly, that is a massive amount of positions. I struggle to see how they can all be engineers actively designing for TAI. IAI had 22,000 workers of all types MAX when Lavi was cancelled! I hesitate to find a reason for so many engineering experts to be needed unless there is a severe lack of Aerospace infrastructure/supply-chain in Turkey so as to have TAI design every single subsystem.

  18. #558
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    Unfortunately, the briefing on the TF-X program is in Turkish. However, I am sure some Turkish speakers on this forum will translate the relevant parts.

    For those that don't know who this man is- he has been put in charge of the TF-X program by President Erdogan and is the former CEO of Turkish Airlines.

    The TAI CEO has also stated that the total TFX program budget is approximately $20 billion USD.

    2,850 additional PhD level aerospace engineers who have worked on significant aerospace programs globally have already relocated to Turkey.

    TAI is building several new engineering design and development buildings.

    Turkey aims to transform TAI into a global aerospace engineering powerhouse by 2030.

    The CEO has stated that he intends to attract pre-emminent aerospace engineers from abroad by offering them very very lucrative salary packages.
    Last edited by Bayar; 28th August 2017 at 15:29.

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    Dmitry Shugayev says Turkish S-400's are ready for delivery (the off-the-shelf orders not co-produced batteries).

    This means that Turkey must have purchased these systems long ago and the public became aware of the order latter on or Russia is transferring batteries from its own inventory.

    Russia is ready to deliver S-400s to Turkey
    President of the Russian Federal Military Technical Cooperation Agency says that the S-400 missile systems are ready to be supplied to Turkey

    Editor / Internet
    13:15 August 28, 2017
    Yeni Şafak
    http://www.yenisafak.com/en/world/ru...turkey-2787145

    After months of closed-door meetings between Moscow and Ankara regarding the S-400 missile systems deal, Dmitry Shugayev said that the two countries would soon reach an agreement regarding the finer details of the deal.

    “The sale of the S-400 air defense systems to Turkey is ready for delivery. Of course, the S-400 contract with Turkey is not a simple rifle sales contract. We are talking about a serious system. Hence there are certain delicate parts of the subject. Moscow and Ankara will soon reach an agreement on the final touches that need to be resolved,” Shugayev said in a statement to the Kommersant newspaper.

    “Allies across the ocean are opposed to Turkey’s decision. However, Turkey is an independent country, and makes its own decision whether to buy a product or not,” he added in response to the U.S. reaction to the deal.

    Turkish publication “Hürriyet” reported that in a press statement Shugayev delivered two days ago, he said, “This agreement is suitable for Russia’s geopolitical and strategic interests. Nobody should doubt this.”

  20. #560
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    Below is an English version of the TAI CEO's Briefing on the current state of the Turkish Aerospace Industry sector.

    Temel Kotil, President & CEO of TAI:
    “By 2026, TAI will be making a turnover of $10 billion and employing 25,000.”

    http://www.milscint.com/en/files/201...7-TUSAS-en.pdf

    As one of the most well regarded companies when it comes to the future of the Turkish defence and aerospace industry, TAI is preparing for a new era where it will witness an increase in its business volume both in the areas of defence and commercial aviation. Temel Kotil, President and CEO of TAI, gave us some indications about this upcoming era.

    Ümit BAYRAKTAR
    ubayraktar@milscint.com
    K. Burak CODUR b.codur@milscint.com
    Vehbi TUNCA v.tunca@milscint.com

    TF-X, we will become the world’s fourth country to have this type of aircraft. Meanwhile; Japan, the Republic of Ko- rea, Iran and India are also working on similar projects. So there is a competi- tion between countries.

    TAI will be working with BAE Systems during the first phase of this project. At the signing ceremony we held with BAE Systems, we promised, in front of everyone, to both our Prime Minister and the British Prime Minister that the TF-X will become the world’s best fighter jet. We realise this is a very big and ambitious promise; but it is one based on solid grounds.

    BAE Systems has assumed important roles in the F-35 project. It is a company that is knowledgeable on fifth generation fighter aircraft. Ahead of us is a four-year preliminary design phase, where the architecture of the aircraft will be determined. And in the following eight-year period, we will complete the design of the aircraft. The TF-X’s first flight is planned for 2023, and the aircraft is expected to enter the inventory in 2029. Serial production will then begin, to meet the requirements of the Turkish Air Force and of friendly and allied countries. Many countries across the world cannot afford the costs of other fifth generation aircraft. The TF-X will hence represent a very important alternative in this regard.

    BAE Systems will be supporting us with more than 100 of its employees. Their level of technical support will be in the region of 450 man/years. They will also give us access to their software and database.

    In addition, globally, there is a group of about 200 people working on various combat aircraft projects. This group is working on project basis, so when a project ends, its members move on to another project. The F-35 project has been completed, and we are now trying to attract a significant portion of this team to the TF-X project. Regardless of whether they are Turkish nationals or not, we are looking forward to bringing every experienced person in this field to our country. Of course, we also have our own staff. TAI has no prior experience in the development of supersonic aircraft, but we will fill this gap with the sources of support I just mentioned.

    A very large team will be working on the project. Currently, we are constructing an immense engineering facility on our premises. It will be the best engineering facility in the world; It will, in a sense, be a Palace of Technology.

    MSI TDR: Another important message you gave when you took office was that you would be adding another zero to TAI’s turnover, increasing it from its current level of $1 billion to 10 $billion. How will you achieve this? What type of activities are you conducting to reach this objective? What kind of a TAI will we see once this target is achieved?

    Temel KOTİL: Allow me to explain what we are going to do at TAI by giving an example from Turkish Airlines (THY). Every year at Turkish Airlines, we achieved a higher growth rate than that the companies which were larger than us. If you carry more passengers than the annual increase in these companies’ number of passengers, you can eventually close the gap. And sooner or later, you can catch up with them. In this respect, the number of extra passengers you carry every year is significant. Although TAI is a small company when compared with the giants of the aviation industry, it is still the largest in Turkey and the Muslim world, and can utilise this potential to its benefits.

    As long as it achieves a growth rate higher than larger companies, TAI will eventually catch up with them. To reach the target of $10 billion by 2026, we need to grow at an annual rate of at least 25 percent in the next decade, although this year our growth rate will be 67 percent. Across the globe, the average annual growth rate of the industry is just five percent. We aim to grow five times more.

    Therefore, what we are doing, first of all, is to force TAI to grow at a rapid pace. When I use the word force, what I mean is: taking a decision, setting our goals and claims, and implementing our deci- sions as rapidly as possible.

    Secondly, such a rapid growth rate can never be achieved organically, meaning that we need to grow inorganically. We have a small company in Germany, which we plan to make larger in the coming period. If we concentrate on it, we can definitely improve that facility. Moreover, as we have seen with Turkish Airlines, opening up to different parts of the world helps enrich the corporate culture. When acquiring companies abroad, TAI will also take the positive aspects of their cultures.

    Thirdly, Turkey is still an inexpensive country. We can engage in production more economically than any other country. We are now restructuring our company and are increasing the number of staff. But this recruitment only includes engineers and technicians. As the number of engineers and technicians increases, our overall expenses will decrease. In one or two years, you will see that TAI will be offering the lowest-cost production capabilities in the world.

    MSI TDR: Which country and company is next, according to the company acquisition plans of the TAI?

    Temel KOTİL: TAI is conducting significant projects with leading international companies, such as Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Boeing. That’s why we want to acquire a US based company that is part of these companies’ supply chain. We will provide this company every kind of support; however our expectation is, of course, to see the company standing on its own two feet. We are also interested in acquiring companies in France, the United Kingdom and Canada.

    MSI TDR: What kind of a TAI will we see, once this target of $10 billion is achieved?

    Temel KOTİL: It is all about mathematics. Today, our revenue is slightly over $500 million, and this comes from our work for Airbus, Boeing, Bombardier and Lockheed Martin. This means that the value of the parts we produce for platforms designed by others is valued at $500 million. Had our departments carried out production for TAI’s own indigenous products, our revenues would have been $5 billion, because you create more value when you integrate parts to make your own product. You just need to have indigenous products and designs – and we have our own designs. We developed HÜRKUŞ as a trainer aircraft. We recently conducted the fire test of the close air support version, and are about to start its production. We also designed the Indigenous Helicopter, which is going to conduct its first flight in Septem- ber 2018. We also have the ANKA, in the field of unmanned aerial vehicles.

    In this way, we will achieve growth with our indigenous products. Of course, we will also increase the share related to the production of parts in our turnover, which is currently at $500 million. We envisage that we can reach a turnover of $2-3 billion in this area. To achieve this goal, we will reduce our costs even further; be- cause if we are expensive, we will not be awarded with projects involving the pro- duction of parts. We will reduce our la- bour costs by 30 percent in two years. Of course, we will do this by increasing pro- ductivity rather than paying fewer wages.

    MSI TDR: What will be export performance of a TAI with a turnover of $10 billion?

    Temel KOTİL: Looking at the domestic market, we can see, for example, that the Turkish Armed Forces will not be making procurements at a level of $10 billion per year anytime in the near future. So we envisage that 90 percent of our $10 billion turnover will come from abroad.
    As a matter of fact, in today’s world, technology companies can only survive by exporting. Turkey makes about one percent of the world in terms of population, economy and surface area. However, the only way of becoming a player that has a say in the world is to hold approximately five to ten percent of the market. Even if we were to meet all of Turkey’s needs, this would still leave us at one-fifth of our target. That’s why we will be focusing more on exports.

    MSI TDR: At this point, would you like to say something about Turkey’s 2023 export targets? What portion of these targets will TAI accomplish?

    Temel KOTİL: TAI is a platform manufacturer and integrator. From this point of view, yes, our products will incorporate subsystems provided by various Turkish companies, even though we will be the one selling the products. Thus, we will be making a considerable contribution to the export figures. Currently, our annual export is at the level of $500 million, and we are aiming to be making $2-3 billion of exports by the year 2023.

    MSI TDR: As you are also the Chairman of the Board of Directors of TEI, we would like to ask you how TEI will be affected by this goal?

    Temel KOTİL: We are TEI’s major shareholder. Under my chairmanship, we have also held the first board meet- ing, where I emphasised that TEI’s turn- over should increase. Prof. Dr. Mahmut Faruk Aksit, President and CEO of TEI, is a very knowledgeable person. He has worked at GE, so he knows all about engines and their parts. He has also reached the summit of his academic ca- reer, and is a professor. We expect TEI to make high turnovers under his leadership. Just like TAI, TEI should also be producing indigenous products. For ex- ample, they will develop the engine of the Indigenous Helicopter.

    We don’t Want Engineers on Paper

    MSI TDR: We know from our previous conversations that another issue to which you attach importance is having a qualified work force that will help Turkey reach its future goals. Both as an executive and an academician, could you tell us about your approach to this issue and your projects aimed at improving human resources?

    Temel KOTİL: The defence industry and advanced technology sector can be likened to the jewellery business. It is a boutique service, so to speak, but it also requires detailed analysis. You can carry out this business only if you work with engineers and technicians of the highest quality. To give you example: the tolerance values for a car’s body are within millimetre ranges, while in the aerospace industry, we sometimes have to deal with tolerance values within micron ranges. So we have to assign Turkey’s most qualified human resources to TAI. There is a commonly used expression: “An engineer on paper”. Young people arrive at the university without any previous practical experience. But they then graduate from university in the same way, without having learned any- thing practical during their education, the difference being that they are now labelled as engineers. So everything - including their knowledge – is just on paper, which is why we use call them “engineers on paper.” From now on, we don’t want our universities to raise engi- neers on paper. For this reason, we have launched an excellent project with Is- tanbul Technical University (İTÜ), thanks to the support of the valued members of the Board of Directors. Twenty-four students and 11 faculty members from the Departments of Aeronautical En- gineering and Mechanical Engineering have formed a team that will design an aircraft within the next 2 years, going through the same processes we experi- enced when designing the HÜRKUŞ. We will support them, buy them the neces- sary equipment, and manufacture the aircraft they design. But they will have to work as if they are preparing a proj- ect for the Undersecretariat for Defence Industries (SSM); they will go through certain phases such as preliminary de- sign and critical design. We would like to carry out a similar project with the Middle East Technical University (METU) as well.

    We also want students to work part- time with us before they graduate from university. Currently, we have eight stu- dents from İTÜ working part-time.
    In addition to the engineering projects, we also have a similar ongoing work for technicians. We are operating a joint academy with Gazi University, where we train technicians.

    MSI TDR: How many people will TAI be employing on the way to achieving its turnover targets?

    Temel KOTİL: This is also about mathematics. Let me remind you what I just said: Currently, we are only recruiting engineers and technicians. At the moment, our company employs 1,400 engineers. Over the next decade, a total of 10,000 engineers will be working on the TF-X project alone, although some of them will be outsourced. The technicians will be twice this number, so there will be 25,000 employees. This means that by 2026, TAI will be making a turn- over of $10 billion and employing 25,000. At this point, I would like to share a mes- sage with our young friends. We want young, hardworking and self-learning engineers who are fluent in English and have a high-grade point average.

    MSI TDR: In this process, where do you position the Small and Medium- sized Enterprises (SMEs) that are your subcontractors, and the subsidiary industry? How will this growth be mirrored on them? What do you expect them to do?

    Temel KOTİL: Recently, we had a meeting with SMEs. We told them: Just tell us which part of our work you are in- terested in; we can handover all of that part to you, because we have other more ambitious work to deal with. But there is a bottleneck here: These companies are generally interested in the production of detail parts. They cut block metals to produce parts from them. But today, CNC machines do not require as much workforce as they did before. TAI can purchase these machines at a more competitive price, as it buys large num- bers of them. Accordingly, companies that produce detail parts are no longer attractive. However, we need companies that can produce subsystems for platforms, such as landing gear, ventilation systems and hydraulic systems. We want SMEs to focus on these areas. For example, we want companies that are able to produce the prototypes of the designs we develop. We are in need of labour-intensive and boutique works that require great expertise. If they offer us such work, we can indeed transfer more business to them; however, there is not much future for usual and ordinary work.

    Platforms are Becoming Mature

    MSI TDR: What can you say about your work on the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) projects? There were plans for six ANKA UAVs and associated ground systems being delivered in 2017, and four UAVs and associated ground systems being delivered in 2018. Is this plan still valid?

    Temel KOTİL: We are continuing our work on the ANKA-S programme at full speed. We have completed the as- sembly of two aircraft. They are ready, and are being used in the qualification tests we are conducting together with our customer. In these tests, we are demonstrating that we meet each one of the contract requirements. We have improved our aircraft manufacturing processes, and now we are able to make serial production much faster. In addition to the two ready-to-use aircraft, we have six more aircraft that are still in the assembly phase. Of these, we will deliver a total of six this year, and the deliveries of the remaining four will be made together with the Operations Training and Simulator Centre in 2018, as sched- uled. With the introduction of these capabilities, the Turkish Air Force will acquire the ability to control the ANKA from a single centre, independently of the site of deployment, via satellites and the TAFICS (Turkish Armed Forces Inte- grated Communication System).

    We are also continuing to work at full speed for ANKA Block-B. This year, we will complete a total of 17 ANKA UAVs. There is a very strong demand. We see a lot of demand from countries around the world, especially from the Far East, Gulf Region and South America. We have also been continuously improving the aircraft. We add features that will reduce its weight, increase its perfor- mance, and share more work with our subsidiary industry.

    MSI TDR: Could you tell us about the delivery activities for the T129 ATAK helicopter to the Turkish Armed Forces and the related export activities? What would you like to say about the recent situation regarding your campaign for Pakistan?

    Temel KOTİL: In accordance with the signed contract, 20 helicopters have been delivered in the context of the ATAK Programme, which was initiated for the production of a total of 91 heli- copters consisting of 59 firm and 32 op- tional orders, as of April. T129 ATAK he- licopters have been in active use in the inventory of the Turkish Armed Forces (TAF) since 2014.

    Since the time it was selected by the TAF, there has been great interest for the T129 ATAK helicopter in foreign markets. This high level of interest is increasing day by day, especially as the deliveries progress and the delivered helicopters prove themselves on the field of operations. With its superior performance at high altitude and under high temperatures, the T129 ATAK helicopter is attracting keen interest from the international market, especially from Pakistan, Gulf countries and Asian countries.

    Within the framework of the intensive and serious testing process of the Pa- kistan Armed Forces, our T129 ATAK helicopter has carried out all kinds of difficult tasks in the Pakistan environ- ment, even in the Himalayas, and has successfully completed the tests, mak- ing us proud of its great performance. In this context, our talks with Pakistan’s official authorities are taking place at every level.

    MSI TDR: How is the Indigenous Helicopter project progressing?

    Temel KOTİL: Within the scope of the Indigenous Helicopter Development Programme, which is progressing in line with all the milestones, programme budgets and timetables, we are now working on the critical design phase. In the context of the programme for the prototype development of the T625 Heli- copter and the production of two of these helicopters, we are designing fuselage and advanced avionic systems. This is being done in addition to designing and manufacturing of the systems of critical importance – such as the transmission, rotor, dynamic components and landing gear – by using totally indigenous capabilities.

    As Fikri Işık, the Minister of National Defence, emphasised during his visit to our facilities, we are working with de- termination to carry out the first flight of T625 Helicopter on September 6, 2018, at 06:00 A.M. at the TAI facilities.

    MSI TDR: What about the progress of the HÜRKUŞ programme? We know that the first fire test was conducted on the HÜRKUŞ-C. When replying, could you also comment on this development?

    Temel KOTİL: As you know, our project activities for three different variants of the HÜRKUŞ – namely the A, B and C variants – are continuing intensively. In the HÜRKUŞ-A project, we received a certificate from the Directorate General of Civil Aviation and EASA, based on CS- 23 standards – which is a first for Tur- key. The aircraft were then approved by SSM and delivered to TAI. We are now carrying out weapon firing demonstra- tions with these aircraft and conducting improvement work for the HÜRKUŞ-B project. As part of the weapon firing demonstrations, we successfully conducted our first fire test, with our Minis- ter of National Defence in attendance. In the coming period, we will proceed with the preparatory tests for the HÜRKUŞ-C project.

    On April 7, the SSM published the Re- quest for Proposal Document concern- ing the Procurement of Armed HÜRKUŞ, which is needed by the Turkish Land Forces. We are working on the propos- al and its submission. Accordingly, the contract for HÜRKUŞ-C is scheduled for signing in May. A total of 32 aircraft, consisting of 8 in initial configuration, 12 in full configuration and 12 optional or- ders, are planned for procurement with- in the scope of this project.
    In the context of the HÜRKUŞ-B project, assembly works are continuing for the 15 aircraft that were ordered to meet the basic flight training need of the Turkish Air Force. In addition, there are 40 optional orders for this variant. At the moment, the seventh fuselage and the fifth wing are in the stage of assembly and system deployment. We are aiming to initiate the ground tests in the sum- mer months, and the flight tests of the HÜRKUŞ-B aircraft over the course of this year. According to the signed HÜRKUŞ-B contract, the first delivery is scheduled for June 2018, while the fif- teenth and final delivery is scheduled for June 2019.

    MSI TDR: In some phases of the HÜRKUŞ project, the issue of implementing the option for 15 aircraft within the scope of the KT-1T project had caused considerable debate. Now, could it be possible for Turkey to buy an aircraft of this class from abroad? Temel KOTİL: There shouldn’t be such a purchase, because we are completing the HÜRKUŞ this year. We are grateful to ASELSAN for accelerating its work on the digital cockpit. So we are talking about an earlier date of delivery: late 2017 or early 2018, instead of June 2018, the previously scheduled date. We will first start producing for the needs of the Turkish Air Force, and then begin the production of the close air support ver- sion for the Turkish Land Forces. During 2018, we will produce three aircraft a month.

    We will also develop a simulator for the HÜRKUŞ. For this, our business partner will be HAVELSAN. We are preparing a full-fledged training programme, and our forecast is that around 100 HÜRKUŞ aircraft will be sold.

    MSI TDR: What can you say about the cooperation with Pakistan within the scope of the Primary Trainer Aircraft project?

    Temel KOTİL: Currently, contract nego- tiations are underway between the SSM and Pakistan’s PAC Kamra, regarding the procurement of Super Mushshak aircraft to meet the Turkish Air Force’s need for 52 Primary Trainer Aircraft. In order to increase the rate of local participation, in line with our government’s expectations, we are in talks with PAC Kamra concern- ing the tasks to be given to TAI within the scope of this programme.

    MSI TDR: In addition to the ATAK project, which was built on a model similar to that of the Regional Aircraft Project, TAI has also covered serious ground in the HÜRKUŞ project,

    where the aircraft was designed from scratch. Given TAI’s current level of knowledge and experience, would you have preferred to design an aircraft from scratch, instead of building on an existing aircraft?

    Temel KOTİL: The HÜRKUŞ is a full- fledged aircraft. There is no equipment on other aircraft that is not also found in the HÜRKUŞ. It is a single engine aircraft. If you put two engines on it, it would become a little larger; and if you added a jet engine, it would become a different type of aircraft. But the com- puter, controls, displays, and the digi- tal cockpit would not be so different. Of course, larger aircraft require different budgets and more time for develop- ment. But they are essentially the same. Therefore, TAI is capable of building an aircraft from scratch.

    We are also working on different proj- ects. Boeing is at the eve of an aircraft development decision that will address the segment between the Airbus A321
    and the A330. This will be equivalent to the Boeing 757. We sent an official let- ter to Boeing in which we stated that we would like to take part in this project as a partner. I cannot give an exact figure, but we can contribute a serious budget. At this point, our experience in the air- line business helps us know what needs to be done regarding the aircraft to be developed. We are also looking after such opportunities.

    The future and sustainability of compa- nies such as TAI depends on civilian programmes. These programmes provide a continuous input. Last year, Turkish Airlines received the 10,000th aircraft of Boeing 737 series. You cannot manufac- ture 10,000 warplanes. As a result, civil- ian programmes are a must for us. I am looking at this issue from a commercial point of view. For the defence side, it is not a very good model to be always de- pendent on government support. We need civilian projects to be able to stand on our own two feet.

    MSI TDR: Is there anything you would like to add?

    Temel KOTİL: TAI is a very strong com- pany. Today, we are working towards increasing the number of TAI’s projects concerning the production of indigenous products. That’s why I place emphasis on engineers and technicians. While having engineers means unique designs, hav- ing technicians means the work force to produce them. In the course of the next decade, this is what you will see in TAI: Technicians will be at the forefront, en- gineering will be right behind them, and I will be at the very back.

    On behalf of our readers, we would like to thank Temel Kotil, President and CEO of TAI, for taking the time to answer our questions and for providing us with such valuable information.

    Last edited by Bayar; 29th August 2017 at 16:39.

  21. #561
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    530
    Turkey and Russia Sign S-400 Contract;
    Turkey pays deposit to Rostec of Russia for S-400's;
    Russia to give loan to Turkey for balance of payment;

    Turkish media speculating that the deal is worth US $3 billion and Turkey has made a pre-payment of $0.5 billion.

    http://news.az/articles/world/125241
    https://sputniknews.com/military/201...-turkey-s-400/
    http://www.arabnews.com/node/1159681/middle-east
    http://tass.com/world/965090
    https://news.yahoo.com/a/37060098/tu...stems-erdogan/

  22. #562
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    145
    Great news, they can use it to down another Fencer.

  23. #563
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,728
    Or test their F-35s against.... I wonder Russian "tech support" will be coming with them to "help" with the tests?
    "The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese."

  24. #564
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    530
    Turkey is preparing for withdrawal of export approval for the F-35 in the coming weeks from the US.

    Turkish media is reporting that Turkey foresaw Germany, the US and some other NATO "allies" imposing a de facto arms embargo on Turkey and that Turkey had developed contingencies.

    Germany yesterday announced its total arms ban on Turkey. Turkey is now waiting for the US announcement.

    No one should be surprised in Turkey announces a massive combat aircraft order from Russia in the coming weeks ;-)

    Meanwhile, Russian Presidential Aide for Military Technical Cooperation Vladimir Kozhin confirms that delivery of first 2 batteries from diverted stock will commence very soon.
    Last edited by Bayar; 13th September 2017 at 08:46.

  25. #565
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    4,083
    No one should be surprised in Turkey announces a massive combat aircraft order from Russia in the coming weeks ;-)
    Come on ! What a joke !!!
    ...

    He was my North, my South, my East and West,
    My working week and my Sunday rest,
    My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
    I thought that love would last forever; I was wrong.

    The stars are not wanted now; put out every one:
    Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
    Pour away the ocean and sweep up the woods:
    For nothing now can ever come to any good.
    -------------------------------------------------
    W.H.Auden (1945)

  26. #566
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,706
    that MIG-35 will be ideal for quick induction as it share that engine with JF-17. The Astana peace process for Syria. An Arab issue solved in non-arab country.
    After that the First Scientific summit in Astana. Russia showing cards to Arabs in sophisticaed way that there relationship with West has made them backward and unimportant.


    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20..._136516145.htm
    KUWAIT, Aug. 10 (Xinhua) -- The Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) will hold its first Summit on Science and Technology in Kazakhstan in September, local media reported Thursday

  27. #567
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,896
    Yep. I heard that Ferrari users too are looking at Seat products for replacement....

  28. #568
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    4,083
    that MIG-35 will be ideal for quick induction as it share that engine with JF-17. The Astana peace process for Syria. An Arab issue solved in non-arab country.
    The actual BS-level has reached another zenith !!

    What does turkey want with MiG-35 and even more - or actual less - with the JF-17 ????
    Some of You are indeed either drinking too much or smoke too strange stuff.
    ...

    He was my North, my South, my East and West,
    My working week and my Sunday rest,
    My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
    I thought that love would last forever; I was wrong.

    The stars are not wanted now; put out every one:
    Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
    Pour away the ocean and sweep up the woods:
    For nothing now can ever come to any good.
    -------------------------------------------------
    W.H.Auden (1945)

  29. #569
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    2,741
    Turkey is preparing for withdrawal of export approval for the F-35 in the coming weeks from the US
    How I wish that were true, exporting anything to Erdoğan is a mistake.

    Even with the critical software and technology firewalled, selling weapons to him will be a geopolitical black eye considering his current path.
    Last edited by FBW; 13th September 2017 at 15:24.

  30. #570
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    11,924
    Turkey is preparing for withdrawal of export approval for the F-35 in the coming weeks from the US.
    Not in the know on what is going around with the Turkish involvement but I would love for this to be true, and with it the other WS cooperation.
    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

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