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Giant B-17 crash landing

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  • dominicm
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Jun 2015
    • 166

    Giant B-17 crash landing

    Handled like a full size pilot. Nice skills in a potentially disastrous situation.

  • J Boyle
    With malice towards none
    • Oct 2004
    • 9650

    #2
    Looks just like Paul Mantz doing his wheels up landing in Twelve O'Clock High.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

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    • dominicm
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Jun 2015
      • 166

      #3
      I thought it reminded me of something I'd seen in a film!

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      • J Boyle
        With malice towards none
        • Oct 2004
        • 9650

        #4
        My original comment was a bit tonge-in-cheek, but you're correct, the one wheel landing is similar to the scene in Tora, Tora, Tora which portrays B-17s arrival in Hawaii during the Japanese attack.
        During filming, a B-17 had an actual emergency and film of its landing was used in the final production.
        There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

        Comment

        • skyskooter
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Oct 2012
          • 395

          #5
          Why do model aircraft always seem to have small two bladed propellers? It ruins the effect on otherwise perfect scale models.

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          • J Boyle
            With malice towards none
            • Oct 2004
            • 9650

            #6
            A couple of guesses by a non-RC expert...

            -electric motors spin at a very high RPM...higher than a real aircraft engine.
            At those RPMs, only a two blades prop is necessary.
            -If you look at a real B-17 it has very narrow "toothpick" props...scale items would not work on an electric model.
            Last edited by J Boyle; 14th August 2018, 16:46.
            There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

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            • skyskooter
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Oct 2012
              • 395

              #7
              Thanks.

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              • vultee35
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Mar 2005
                • 1714

                #8
                Originally posted by skyskooter View Post
                Why do model aircraft always seem to have small two bladed propellers? .....
                Models almost always have non-geared output shafts on the engines ( real engines, not electric ) and therefore don't have the torque to turn a scale three blade prop. The engines just aren't powerful enough. Adding an engine with enough power and torque is likely to make the model seriously over weight, as with this Tigercat I built for Al's Hobbies. This model has two five cylinder 150cc radial engines turning scale props, but pushed the all up weight from the 35 to 40 pounds it should have been to over 70 pounds. It was therefore very heavily loaded and had to fly fast to stay in the air.


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                Stephen Carr

                Only dead fish swim with the stream.

                See my Websites Here

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                • skyskooter
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Oct 2012
                  • 395

                  #9
                  Thats more like it.

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