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  • Tango III
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Sep 2006
    • 24908

    Small Navies Thread

    This new thread will be open to share the photos, news and discussion about the small and the other navies around the world.

    Welcome to all post Anyone who can contribute photos or disc.,etcadditional info would be greatly appreciated.

    I decided to start this thread with photos and discussion about the Georgian Navy.

    The Georgian Navy (Georgian Naval Forces).

    The creation of the Georgian Navy was entrusted to a former Soviet submarine commander, Captain First Rank Alexander Dzhavakhishvili in 1990
    Today Georgia has two independent Naval structures:

    - the Navy ( Naval Defense Forces)
    - the Coast Guard (formed in 1996)

    Georgia set out to build a navy on July 7, 1993 (Georgias Navy Day). Ship Gantiadi commanded by experienced sailor Shuqri Kopaliani performed the first sea battle near Tamishi on the 7th of July, 1993. This day entered in the history as the day of Naval Forces establishment. The navy-building began with equipping fishing vessels by small caliber anti-aircraft guns and machine guns. In 1996, Georgia resumed its demands on its portion of the ex-Soviet Black Sea Fleet, and the Russian refusal to allot Georgia a portion of the ex-Soviet navy became another bone of contention in the progressively deteriorating Georgian-Russian relations. This time, Ukraine endorsed Tbilisis claims, turning over several patrol boats to the Georgian Navy and starting to train Georgian crews, but was unable to include in the final fleet deal a transfer of the formerly Poti-based vessels to Georgia. Later, the rest of the Georgian share was decided to be ceded to Russia in return for diminution of debt.

    Later in the 1990s, Georgia, with the help of the NATO member states, chiefly the United States, Turkey and Greece, managed to build up a small naval force. Yet, until recently, the Georgian Navy had, in many ways, been the most inferior component of the armed forces without any clear operational doctrine and lacking resources necessary to maintain seaworthy ships or conduct training missions. In contrast, the Georgian Coast Guard, which is part of the Border Guard Department and subordinate to the Interior Ministry, is the most effective force in Georgia today. Responsible for border security, the coast guard polices Georgia's coastline (with the exception of a portion of breakaway Abkhazia's waters), manages the 12 nautical miles (22 km) of territorial water and secures the country's two principal ports, Poti and Batumi.

    The headquarters and a principal naval base are located at the Black Sea port of Poti. The other, smaller naval base is in Batumi, Adjara. Besides the Poti-based naval force, the Georgian navy also includes a Special Counter-terrorist Detachment.

    The Georgian Navy consists of 19 other smaller Patrol Boats of different origin boats and 531 personnel.

    Georgian Navy vessels:

    Missile boats: 2.

    The Dioskuria is a French-built La Combattante II (1971), obtained in 2004 from Greece, formerly the PG Ypoploiarchos Batsis (P 17). Equipped with the four MM38 Exocet missile system , two Oerlikon 35 mm twin cannons and two 533 mm torpedo-launchers, it is the most powerful combat craft in the Georgian Navy.

    La Combattante II Class

    Displacement (full load) 255 t
    Dimensions 47 x 7.1 x 2.5 m
    Crew 32
    Propulsion 4 x MTU 16V538 TB90 x 2,610 kW Diesel
    4 shafts
    Maximum Speed 36.5 kts
    Range 850 nm @ 25 kts, 2,000 @ 15 kts
    Weapon Systems 2 x 2 Gun 35 mm/90 cal.
    4 x MM38 Exocet SSM
    2 x 533 mm Torpedo Tubes (for SST4)
    Navigation: Decca 1226C; I-band. Fire control: Thomson-CSF Castor II; I/J-band; range 31 km (17 NM) for 2 m2 target.






    The Tbilisi is a Soviet 206MP project boat, obtained in 1999 from Ukraine. It is equipped with two Termite missile launchers, The ship was discovered on fire in the Georgian naval base of Poti on August 13, 2008.

    Matka (Project 206MP) Class

    Displacement: 260 tons full load
    Dimensions: 39.5 x 7.6 (12.5) x 2.1 (4) meters
    Propulsion: 3 Type 504 diesels , 3 shafts, 15,000 bhp, 40 knots
    Range: 600 miles@35kt.
    Armament:2xSSM SS-N-2C Styx,1-76mm/60 , 1-30mm/65 AK 630, 6 barrels.
    Crew: 33






    Batumi (artillery cutter) (hull number 301) the former PSKR (Border Guard Escort Ship)-648. Built in Ukraine in 1976. Transferred from Ukraine in 1998 in a disarmed state. In a poor state of repair at Balaklava and operational status is doubtful. Went into refit in Balaklava but not refit.

    'Stenka' class patrol boats (Project 205M/205P)

    Displacement: 250 tons full load
    Dimensions: 39.4 x 8 x 2.5 meters
    Propulsion: 2 M70 gas turbines, 2 shafts, 20,000 shp, 35 knots
    Crew: 25
    Sonar: Ros'-K dipping
    Armament: 2x 37mm/L 68



    Kutaisi (202) tranfered from Turkey 12th May, 1998, the former Turk class cutter AB-30, built to a French design in 1969. one Army ZU-23-2 installed by the Georgians.

    AB 25 class small patrol boats

    Displacement: 170 tons full load
    Dimensions: 40.24 x 6.4 x 1.65 meters
    Propulsion: 4 diesels, 2 shafts, 4,800 bhp, 22 knots
    Crew: 31
    Armament: 1x40/60 mm, 1x2 ZSU 23 mm, 2x12.7 mm MG.





    AKA Axmetaa/Akmeta Project 386T (hull number 102) former Soviet Navy torpedo retriever, which is assumed to be one of a number of cutters left by the Black Sea Fleet in Poti in 1992. It was built around 1970. It is armed with two 37mm guns and a 40 barrel 122mm Army BM-21 Grad launcher.




    SKA (rescue cutter) Iveriya (201) and Mestia (203) former Greek 75 ton rescue cutters R 269 Lindos and R 267 Dilos of Greek construction in 1978 to a West German design, transferred to Greece without weapons in February 1998 and Sepetember 1999 respectively, armed by the Georgians with two Army ZU-23-2 each. Displacement 86 tons, speed 27 knots.





    Amphibious forces

    Guriya and Atiya, former Bulgarian reserve MDKs 608 and 612,
    'Vydra' class (Project 106KM) (2 ships)

    Displacement: 550 tons full load
    Dimensions: 54.5 x 7.7 x 2.25 meters.
    Propulsion: 2 diesels, 2 shafts, 600 bhp, 10.5 knots
    Crew: 12
    Cargo: 176 tons.


    and also the Project 1176 landing craft MDK-01 and MDK-02 (the former Black Sea Fleet D-237 and D-293).


    Coast Guard:

    R-22 Aeti former German Lindau-class base minesweeper M1085 Minden (German project 320/331B, built 1960), transferred 15th November, 1998. Full displacement 463 tons, speed 16 knots, armament one 40mm Bofors, two 12.7mm machine guns, minesweeping gear was removed before transfer.




    PKA R-21 Georgiy Toreli former PSKR-629 transferred unarmed by Ukraine in 1999. Armed by the Georgians with two old 37mm single barreled guns. It differs from the Batumi in that it doesnt have a general search radar, only a navigation radar.

    'Stenka' class (Project 205P) PB.

    Displacement: 250 tons full load
    Dimensions: 40.3 x 8 x 4.55 meters
    Propulsion: 3 Type 517 diesels, 3 shafts, 14,000 shp, 35 knots
    Crew: 30
    Armament: 2x 37mm/L 68



    eight units with the numbers R-102 through R-104 and R-203 through R-207. It is supposed that cutters R-206 and R-207 are the former P-139 and P-518. Part of the USSR Border Guards, left in Georgia in unserviceable condition and repaired by the Georgians. It is known that three others (P-203 through P-205) were transferred by Ukraine in 1997-1998 and three more (R-102 through R-104) were built in the Batumi Shipyard (before 2004 they were in the Order of Battle of the Adzhariya Coast Guard), where the Zhuks were built in the Soviet era. The Georgian built cutters, according to some sources, have American-built General Motors diesels and a speed of around 12 knots. Six cutters are armed with one 12.7mm machine gun, but the Georgians armed two (R-204 and R-205) with Army 23mm ZU-23-2 mounts. Right now almost all the cutters are in a conservation state, out of the water and on blocks (and some have been stricken).


    Project 1400M Grif (Zhuk) class PC

    Displacement: 39t standard, 48t full
    Dimensions: 23.8 x 5 x1.2 meters.
    Propulsion: Diesel-direct: 2 Type M401B diesels, 2 shafts
    Max speed: 30kts
    Range: 1000NM @ 15kts
    Complement: 11 (3 officers, 8 enlisted)
    Armament: 4 (2 twin) 12.7mm/79 1NM AA/surface
    SENSORS-Radar Don 2.




    2 Small Cutter Point class tranfferred from US. Navy 2000-2002
    Last edited by Tango III; 28th August 2008, 21:24.
  • Tango III
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Sep 2006
    • 24908

    #2
    The Georgian navy have suffered extensive losses in the 2008 South Ossetia war, On 9 August 2008 one boat was reported to have been hit by gunfire and sunk by units of the Russian Black Sea Fleet off the Abkhazian coast when allegedly entered a Russia imposed 'security zone' along with three other vessels. Other units were sat on fire or sunk by Russian forces at Poti naval pier on 13 August.According to JDW Three Georgian naval ships have been destroyed while alongside the port of Poti, the Chairman of Georgia's National Security Council Alexander Lomaia,

    http://jdw.janes.com/public/jdw/index.shtm

    And here is the story of Black sea Battle:

    While most of the world has focused primarily on the ground conflict in Georgia, the Russian Black Sea Fleet has been active off the coast. By now, you may have heard some isolated reports -- 4000 troops landed by sea at Ochamchire, a battle resulting in a Georgian coast guard ship sunk, and even claims by Georgia of minefields laid off the Georgian coast. Details have been hard to come by. But, piecing together the analysis and reporting, one can get a picture of some of these events.

    While the speed of the Russian Army's response grabbed the attention of western observers, the fast response by the Russian Navy has been quite remarkable, too. The war started on Friday August 8th; the Black Sea Fleet was reported to arrive off the coast of Georgia on Saturday August 9th. That's pretty impressive, considering it is about 400 nautical miles from Sevastopol to Ochamchire. While the Moskva, Smetlivy, Muromets, and Aleksandrovets can make good speed and make the trip quickly, those ships sailed from Sevastopol with an assortment of support vessels that could only make 12-16 knots, at best. Simple math reveals that would make it a 25 hour trip, meaning the ships would have had to put to sea almost immediately after the fighting began. For any fleet to deploy that quickly is extraordinary readiness.

    Then, on the early morning of August 10th, there was a battle at sea. The Russian Black Sea Fleet was engaged by four Georgian coast guard vessels, while conducting landing operations in Ochamchire. The Russians claimed to sink one ship, and the day after the battle the Moskva was reported to be in the Russian port of Novorossiysk.

    New details have emerged that shed a bit of light on the action. A sailor interviewed in the Sevastopol on Wednesday gave the local press his recollection of the action. Here's my amateur translation:

    "We took up station guarding the opposed landing on the Abkhaz shore when all of a sudden four high speed targets were detected. We sent out an IFF signal and the targets didn't react. Receiving a command from the flagship, we got into formation and right at that moment the unidentified targets opened fire on the ship formation and flagship. The cruiser was damaged and a small fire broke out aboard. Then, fearing for seaworthiness, the flagship withdrew from the firing area." - the sailor said.

    "Right then the small missile boats clearly fired," the participant continued. "Taking up position, our MRK launched a "Malakhit" (SS-N-9) anti-surface missile, which literally cut the lead ship, the Tbilisi, to ribbons. After that, fire was shifted to the rest of the Georgian ships. Another ship was damaged, we couldn't finish it off, allowing it to leave the scene under its own power."

    It's a bit of a questionable story. However, the sailor interviewed was appraently from the MRK Mirazh (617, project 12341, NATO - Nanuchka III). Why does that matter? Because the MRK Mirazh is the ship Russia has credited with the attack. Her Captain, Ivan Dubik, was reported to be in the Kremlin on Thursday accepting congratulations.

    Some of the details of the sailor's story are slightly inaccurate -- call it fog of war. The Georgian ship sunk was not the Tbilisi, as the sailor suggests. Rather it was the Georgian patrol boat P-21 Georgy Toreli. A night battle in the littoral, the Georgians armed only with guns, yet the little flotilla of four was able to get in close to Moskva and start a little fire. Covering its withdraw, the Mirazh missile boat is reported to have sunk the ship in only 90 seconds in what was reported as 300 meters of water.

    According to Al Jazeera, the Coast Guard base in Poti was attacked with artillery on Wednesday after the cease-fire, destroying the rest of the coast guard ships in port. The Tbilisi, which was reported to be in bad condition prior to the war, was sunk in that attack.

    As for the 4000 troops? All indications are the Russian Navy reportedly used three amphibious ships to ferry the 4000 paratroopers from Novorossiysk-- reportedly without vehicles. Recent analysis tends to imply the vehicles came separately -- by rail.

    http://blog.wired.com/defense/2008/0...edia.html#more



    Last edited by Tango III; 28th August 2008, 21:11.

    Comment

    • Tango III
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Sep 2006
      • 24908

      #3
      More pics of damaged a Georgian coast guard ships in Poti , it seem the biggest Georgian coast guard ship (R-22 Aeti) was damaged seriously:

      http://tuku.military.china.com/milit...002_951178.htm



      Last edited by Tango III; 20th August 2008, 14:32.

      Comment

      • Tango III
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Sep 2006
        • 24908

        #4
        Old report from Aljazeera reported that Russian forces sink 6 georgian ships

        Russian forces have sunk several coast guard vessels in Georgia's military port of Poti, Al Jazeera's Hoda Abdel Hamid has reported from the scene.

        The attack on Wednesday follows a day of dramatic developments in the Russia-Georgia conflict amid what appears to have been an escalation of military action on the ground.

        Abdel Hamid said: "Russia is clearly on the offensive.

        "We have seen more and more Russian troops coming into the area all day - a continuous build up of forces including columns of tanks and truck all along the roads here.

        "They came into this area and destroyed six Georgian vessels.

        "From what we understand, they came with the specific task of destroying all the military facilities of the Georgians," she said.

        Al Jazeera's Jonah Hull said: "Poti is one of the most important ports in the Black Sea.

        http://english.aljazeera.net/news/eu...517926662.html

        Comment

        • Tango III
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Sep 2006
          • 24908

          #5
          End of the Georgian navys most sophisticated vessels missile boat Dioskuria

          Russian forces in Poti also blocked access to the citys naval and commercial ports on Tuesday morning and towed the missile boat Dioskuria, one of the Georgian navys most sophisticated vessels, out of sight of observers. A loud explosion was heard minutes later, and a Georgian interior spokesman said the Russians had blown up the boat.

          http://www.armytimes.com/news/2008/0...eorgia_081908/

          Comment

          • Argo
            Rank 5 Registered User
            • Jan 2006
            • 115

            #6
            Speculations occured in the croatian press that the gunboats "Petar Kresimir IV" and "Dmitar Zvonimir" might be sold to Georgia. They would both get a minor refit before the sale, if it happens.
            George Costanza: It became very clear to me sitting out there today that every decision I've made in my entire life has been wrong. My life is the complete opposite of everything I want it to be. Every instinct I have, in every aspect of life, be it something to wear, something to eat - it's all been wrong.

            Comment

            • Gollevainen
              The Hermit
              • Nov 2005
              • 1963

              #7
              Well Croatia is buyng few of our Helsinki class which altough being older than the Kralj petar they were certainly in better condition. If this claim is true (which I doupt) then it would mean that the ex-finnish ships would be the primary FAC force of Croatia an propably going to field RBS-15 after all.
              God wanted to create world and figured out that it would take ten days
              ...Gollevainen gave him six...

              Comment

              • Tango III
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Sep 2006
                • 24908

                #8
                Some information indicates some of the media Croatian boats that are in very poor condition.

                http://forum.keypublishing.co.uk/sho...t=77392&page=5

                Comment

                • Argo
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Jan 2006
                  • 115

                  #9
                  The by far the biggest problem with those two ships are the engines, which are russian and therefore, completely useless. The RTOP-21 Sibenik, which is twice the age of Petar Kresimir IV, has MTU engines which are in a much better state then those in the 7 year old Dmitar Zvonimir. Other then that, they have been very well maintained and are relatively new.
                  So, given a engine change, they should be good for a long service.
                  George Costanza: It became very clear to me sitting out there today that every decision I've made in my entire life has been wrong. My life is the complete opposite of everything I want it to be. Every instinct I have, in every aspect of life, be it something to wear, something to eat - it's all been wrong.

                  Comment

                  • Tango III
                    Rank 5 Registered User
                    • Sep 2006
                    • 24908

                    #10
                    Sunk at the pier.
                    Missile Boat "Dioskuriya" & Missile boat "Tbilisi"

                    http://redbannernorthernfleet.blogsp...of-battle.html

                    Comment

                    • Tango III
                      Rank 5 Registered User
                      • Sep 2006
                      • 24908

                      #11
                      According to some Croatian newspapers published news with the beginning of this year for lack of protection of Croatian maritime economic zones of the State along the Croatian coast because of lack of adequate number of patrol boats, which sources attributed this to the Croatian Defense Ministry plans to buy four patrol boats to cover this shortfall, how will the sale two boats for Georgia ?

                      http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/167978.html

                      Last edited by Tango III; 29th August 2008, 17:44.

                      Comment

                      • Tango III
                        Rank 5 Registered User
                        • Sep 2006
                        • 24908

                        #12
                        Patria delivered missile boats to Croatia

                        Patria has delivered two Helsinki-class missile boats to the Croatian Navy on October 13, 2008. The boats have been used by the Finnish Navy. The boat class was removed from service as it reached the end of its lifespan and the renovation was not considered expedient. The missile boats called Kotka and Oulu will be loaded in Turku onboard a ship transporting them to Croatia.

                        According to the contract signed in July 2008 Patria also trains the Croatian crew. Additionally Patria pursues maintenance of the boats.
                        Patria is a strategic partner for the Finnish Navy and has maintained their diesel engines since 1964.

                        Patria is a versatile and flexible partner supporting the Finnish Defence Forces equipment in the different stages of their lifespan. Our operations cover the introduction, maintenance, training, modifications and upgrades as well as decommission in the most effective manner, states Executive Vice President Jukka Holkeri from Patria.

                        Helsinki-class boats have served the Finnish Navy almost 30 years. With its successful structure it was well-suited for the harsh circumstances in the Baltic Sea and its archipelago. With these boats the Finnish Navy became a modern Navy. We are happy to see that these still seaworthy boats can continue in service thanks to Patria, says the Commander of the Finnish Navy, Vice Admiral Hans Holmstrm.

                        Patria is a defence and aerospace group with international operations delivering its customers competitive solutions based on own specialist know-how and partnerships. Patria is owned by the State of Finland and the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company EADS N.V.

                        http://www.patria.fi/modules/release...BF84BA37461E71







                        Last edited by Tango III; 14th October 2008, 16:25.

                        Comment

                        • Argo
                          Rank 5 Registered User
                          • Jan 2006
                          • 115

                          #13
                          Croatian MOD has just posted 4 nice pictures of Helsinkis being loaded on a ship to Croatia

                          http://www.morh.hr/vijesti_main.asp?id=1779

                          George Costanza: It became very clear to me sitting out there today that every decision I've made in my entire life has been wrong. My life is the complete opposite of everything I want it to be. Every instinct I have, in every aspect of life, be it something to wear, something to eat - it's all been wrong.

                          Comment

                          • Tango III
                            Rank 5 Registered User
                            • Sep 2006
                            • 24908

                            #14
                            Showdown In The Bay of Bengal


                            November 5, 2008: Bangladesh and neighboring Myanmar are in a naval standoff over who owns the right to search for, and extract, natural gas and oil along their maritime boundaries. Myanmar was unwilling to wait for the diplomats to sort it all out, and leased some of the disputed tracts to a South Korean company, which sent out four survey ships, accompanied by two Myanmar warships. They were met by four Bangladeshi warships. The weapons embarked on these ships consisted of 3 and 4.5 inch guns, and Chinese Silkworm and C802 anti-ship missiles. The largest Bangladeshi ship is a half century old former British frigate.
                            Neither of these nations is a naval superpower. Both fleets are largely composed of patrol boats, many armed with those ubiquitous Chinese anti-ship missiles. Each nation is believed to have a frigate or corvette sized ship at the scene, as well as some missile armed patrol boats. If it came to violence, the C802 missiles could make quick work of ships on both sides. The older missiles, less so.
                            The last time the C-802 was used in combat, was two years ago, against an Israeli warship. Two C-802s were fired at an 1,100 ton Israeli corvette off the coast of Lebanon. One hit the helicopter hanger, but the warhead failed to go off. The fire on the Israeli ship was caused by the half a ton of missile crashing into it, and unburned rocket fuel. The other C-802 homed in on a nearby Egyptian merchant ship, and sank it (the warhead on that one did detonate). The Israeli anti-missile system was not turned on because it was found to interfere with the electronics on Israeli warplanes operating in the vicinity. This is also an increasing problem in modern warfare. There are so many electronic gadgets transmitting, that there are more cases of signals, literally, getting crossed.
                            The C-802 is a 20 foot long, 360mm, 1,500 pound missile with a 360 pound warhead. The Israeli warship carries electronic defenses against anti-ship missiles, as well as a Phalanx auto-cannon. This systems is supposed to be turned on whenever the ship is likely to have an anti-ship missile fired at it. The Phalanx radar can spot incoming missiles out to about 5,000 meters, and the 20mm cannon is effective out to about 2,000 meters. With incoming missiles moving a 250 meters a second, you can see why Phalanx is set to automatic. There's not much time for human intervention. The Bangladeshi and Myanmar ships don't appear to have any missile defenses.
                            The C-802 needs to work with a radar that can track the target. The C-802 fired in Lebanon apparently used Lebanese government coastal radars for this. The Bangladeshi and Myanmar ships warships have radar on board for this. The C-802 is 30 year old technology, and many of them are quite old. With age comes reliability problems. Bangladesh has many older models of Chinese anti-ship missiles (like the half ton SY-1 Silkworm), and these have been unused for quite some time.


                            http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/hts.../20081105.aspx

                            UMS Anawrahta - Myanmar Navy ship




                            BNS Ali Haider F 17 - Bangladesh Navy ship



                            BNS AbuBakr F 15

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