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  • Tango III
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Sep 2006
    • 25307

    #81
    Lithuania receives ex-RDN patrol craft


    The Lithuanian Navy is to receive the first of three former Royal Danish Navy (RDN) Flyvefisken-class (Standard Flex 300) patrol vessels on 30 May

    http://jdw.janes.com/public/jdw/index.shtml

    Comment

    • Tango III
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Sep 2006
      • 25307

      #82
      Vietnamese build-up a response to China

      Bangkok // Vietnam is buying maritime patrol aircraft to strengthen its offshore capabilities to control its exclusive economic zone and to counter Chinas armed forces build-up.

      The two countries fought a brief but bloody border war in 1979 over Vietnams invasion of Cambodia, whose Khmer Rouge regime was supported by Beijing. They have also clashed sporadically over conflicting claims to the Spratly Islands and the Paracel Islands, both in the South China Sea.

      Hanois force modernisation is probably not directly linked to these territorial feuds, said a Hanoi-based source on condition of anonymity. But it has been strengthening its maritime force with a particular eye on Chinas military build-up.

      Anthony Davis, a regional security analyst in Bangkok, said Vietnam is just being prudent. It is more cautionary than confrontational.

      The Peoples Liberation Armys expansive development is normally seen in the context of Chinas long-standing sovereignty claim to Taiwan, and the potential military involvement of the United States in any conflict that could arise over this issue. However, Vietnams low-profile revival of its armed forces is reflective of broader concerns over Chinas rise in the region.

      The Vietnamese coast guard, separated from the navy in 1998 but still under the defence ministry, is due within days to finalise a contract for three aircraft with an estimated value of 30 million (Dh172m).

      In keeping with Hanois culture of secrecy, the deal has yet to be announced.

      The contract involves three EADS-CASA C212 Series 400 maritime patrol and surveillance aircraft produced in Spain and equipped with the MSS 6000 side-looking airborne radar from Swedish Space Corp. These platforms are capable of conducting eight-hour patrols over a distance of 1,000 nautical miles.

      Vietnams current capability in patrolling its coast is limited. The air force has four Beriev Be-12 flying boats obtained from the former Soviet Union in 1981, but these are thought to be fitted mainly for anti-submarine warfare rather than the wider mission of maritime surveillance.

      The air force sought to address this deficiency through its acquisition from Poland in 2005 of two Skytrucks, with a further eight on option. Warsaw had hoped to outfit these aircraft with a surveillance radar to allow their use in the maritime patrolling role, but Hanoi appears to have grown doubtful after one of the initial two platforms crashed within a few months and killed three people.

      The option for Vietnam to acquire eight additional Skytrucks has yet to be pursued. However, the air force is still thought to be looking to upgrade and expand its maritime surveillance capability under a requirement separate from the coast guard deal.

      The new aircraft should substantially boost the coast guards ability to police Vietnams economic zone.

      This includes the responsibility to control fisheries, address environmental concerns and reduce piracy.

      The agencys lack of resources was highlighted late last year when 800km of undersea cable was stolen, significantly disrupting Vietnams communications traffic.

      Local fishermen are suspected of the theft, which has never been solved.

      Policing issues aside, the Vietnam Peoples Army has been upgrading its offshore capabilities to better balance its forces against a rapidly expanding China. Hanoi and Beijing have seen tensions reduced in recent years through some political accommodation, particularly driven by a surge in trade. Still, suspicions rooted in history and in outstanding territorial disputes remain as thorns impeding close relations.

      Lt Gen Ma Xiaotian, deputy chief of staff of the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army, alluded to such underlying tensions in an otherwise upbeat presentation to delegates attending a recent security conference in Singapore. Touching on several security challenges facing the Asia-Pacific region, he said that traditional territorial and maritime disputes are yet to be properly solved.

      Lt Gen Ma went on to explain the rationale behind Chinas military expansion.

      History tells us that we must rely on ourselves for sufficient defensive capabilities in order to survive and create better lives in peace. To strengthen defence development is the fundamental guarantee to safeguard national sovereignty and territorial integrity, he said.

      Vietnams offshore military build-up is driven by similar thinking.

      Aside from the maritime patrol aircraft requirement, Vietnams effort includes the continuing local production of 30 to 40 blue-water naval ships, the largest at about 2,500 tonnes, and 20 coastal vessels each displacing 200 tonnes to 400 tonnes. Sophisticated anti-ship missiles have been fitted on its Sukhoi Su-22 fighter aircraft and on several surface ships, including one corvette and 12 missile craft, and coastal radars have been upgraded.

      The navy also obtained its first submarines about a decade ago, two small boats acquired from North Korea that are seen as preliminary to a more substantial undersea force that has yet to be prioritised.

      http://www.thenational.ae/article/20...T&Profile=1015

      Comment

      • Tango III
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Sep 2006
        • 25307

        #83
        S Korea Launches Latest High-Tech Submarine

        SEOUL --- South Korea on Wednesday launched the third and latest of its 214-class submarines to be commissioned by the end of next year, bringing the total number of submersibles in the country to 12, Yonhap news agency reported.

        The latest submarine, named "Ahn Jung-geun" after the late independence fighter under Japan's colonial rule of Korea in the early 20th century, was officially launched in a ceremony at the dockyard of Hyundai Heavy Industries in the southeastern city of Ulsan.

        The ceremony was attended by some 100 Hyundai and military officials, including Gen. Kim Tae-young, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Navy Chief of Staff Adm. Jung Ok-keun.

        The 1,800-ton submarine will be commissioned and deployed late next year, along with two other 214-class submarines that were launched in 2006 and 2007, Navy officials said.

        "Our 214-class submarines are the latest of their kind with no match among existing diesel submarines," the Navy said. "They will operate as the main axis of our future maritime force in succession to 209-class submarines."

        Seoul plans to build three more 214-class submarines in the next 10 years, according to Navy officials.

        The new 214-class submarine is equipped with an air-independent propulsion (AIP) system that significantly adds to the ship's stealth capabilities, allowing it to strike enemy vessels or submarines without even being noticed, according to the officials.

        South Korea launched its first Aegis destroyer, Sejong the Great, last year, becoming the fifth nation in the world to possess the high-tech naval ship.

        The country is to build two more Aegis ships by 2012 under an existing project, and plans to build three more Aegis destroyers and three 3,000-ton submarines in the future, according to Navy officials.

        http://www.defense-aerospace.com/cgi...&modele=jdc_34

        Here are Hi res. pics:

        http://kr.blog.yahoo.com/shinecommer...0.html?p=2&t=2
        Last edited by Tango III; 9th July 2008, 22:08.

        Comment

        • Unicorn
          Antipodean Analyst
          • Sep 2005
          • 474

          #84
          HMAS ANZAC SAILS FOR FOREIGN WATERS

          The Royal Australian Navys HMAS Anzac sailed from Fleet Base West today for a five month deployment, which will take her ships company to North America and Asia.

          The first stop in the Anzac Class Frigates busy schedule is Pearl Harbour, where she will join HMA Ships Success, Tobruk, Waller and RAN Clearance Divers for Exercise Rim of the Pacific 2009 (RIMPAC), for the largest maritime exercise in the world.

          The Australian assets will join nine other nations for the month long exercise, which will this year see 35 surface ships, six submarines, more than 100 aircraft and approximately 20,000 personnel combine forces to improve interoperability across the full spectrum of war-fighting activities on land, sea and air, with the focus on the maritime domain.

          During RIMPAC, Anzac will conduct an Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile Firing off the North Coast of Hawaii, said HMAS Anzacs Commanding Officer, Captain Stuart Mayer, RAN, CSC.

          Following RIMPAC, Anzac will sail to Guam where she will undertake a three day port visit prior to commencing an Asia deployment.

          During our two and a half months in Asia, Anzac will visit the ports of Ho Chi Minh, Sattahip, Bangkok, Sihanoukville, Penang and Singapore. Anzac will also take part in two regional exercises including AUSTHAI 08 and Bersama Lima in Singapore, said Captain Mayer.

          HMAS Anzac is the first of her class and a modern warship, capable of operating in a multi-threat environment. Anzacs design is based on the German Meko 200 Class that uses modular construction methods.

          Anzac is fitted with an advanced package of air surveillance radars; hull mounted sonar and electronic support systems that interface with state-of-the-art weapons systems. Anzacs armament comprises a five-inch gun, Harpoon missiles, Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles and Ship Launched Torpedoes. Multi-role Sikorsky Seahawk helicopters can be embarked to enhance anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare capabilities.

          Anzac is the third Royal Australian Navy ship to carry the name of an Australian legend.

          ENDS

          Unicorn
          It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
          It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
          the lips acquire stains, the stains become a warning.
          It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

          Comment

          • Tango III
            Rank 5 Registered User
            • Sep 2006
            • 25307

            #85
            CN-235-MPA for Indonesian Defence Ministry

            Indonesia needs a high-tech operational marine equipment to monitor the situation at its sea and to save its territory.

            On Friday, 6 June 2008, Dirgantara Indonesia delivers a unit of CN-235-220 M MPA configuration, an aircraft with special mission and modern equipment to save Indonesian territory, to Indonesian Defence Ministry in Jakarta. The delivery is personally signed by Dirgantara President, Budi Santoso and General Director of Indonesian Defence Facility, Mayor General Eris Herryanto and Indonesian Airforce Logistics Assistant, Mayor General Imam Wahyudi.

            Budi Santoso says the special missioned aircraft is completed with modern equipment that is for coast patrol on Indonesian territorial waters. For tracking and monitoring tasks, on the aircraft are installed a maritime tracking radar and a multi function radar type Ocean Master 100 MK II.

            While a storm scope guided with ESM type Vigile 200 is installed for detecting electro magnetic content during the maritime detection. The equipment for those military configuration for coast patrol are France Thales Airborne System products.

            Such aircraft are required by Asian countries with border coasts, such as Malaysian, Brunei Darussalam, South Korean and some Middle East countries.

            http://www.defense-aerospace.com/cgi...&modele=jdc_34

            Comment

            • Tango III
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Sep 2006
              • 25307

              #86
              Two Navy destroyers lose missiles

              The Ministry of Defence has confirmed it has withdrawn the missile capability of one warship and is planning to do so from another currently on deployment.

              HMS Southampton, will return from the South Atlantic in December, and will then join HMS Exeter which has already been stripped of its Sea Dart missiles.

              The Portsmouth-based Type 42 destroyers will be taken out of service next year.

              The MoD said both vessels would still be able to defend themselves and carry out "a wide range of tasks".

              An MoD spokesman said: "This decision has been made after careful consideration and is necessary to ensure support to the longer-running Type 42 destroyers can be sustained properly."

              He said HMS Exeter was due to be the next Type 42 to be retired after more than 25 years in the front line and HMS Southampton, which is the second oldest Type 42, will follow in 2009.

              He added: "HMS Exeter and HMS Southampton will continue to be capable of a wide range of tasks.

              "They are armed with a 4.5in (11cm) gun and close range weapons systems and they carry a Lynx helicopter, which can deploy torpedoes, anti-ship missiles or a machine gun.

              "Air defence for the fleet will continue to be provided by the other Type 42 destroyers that will remain in service until gradually replaced by the Daring class Type 45 destroyer, the first of which will enter service in late 2010."


              http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...re/7442739.stm

              Comment

              • Jonesy
                Neo-conversative
                • Jan 2000
                • 5097

                #87
                Well, there you go, if the USN can run OHP's without their SM1's and Mk13's then, goshdarnit, we can run T42's without GWS30!!!.

                Sweet Jesus!

                Comment

                • Wanshan
                  Senior Member
                  • Sep 2004
                  • 3929

                  #88
                  Originally posted by Jonesy View Post
                  Well, there you go, if the USN can run OHP's without their SM1's and Mk13's then, goshdarnit, we can run T42's without GWS30!!!.

                  Sweet Jesus!
                  Expensive little opv you got there, pal!

                  Are they using that freed up space (assuming removal of items) for anything in particular (e.g. special forces) ? Or are they just leaving the magazine/feed system there empty?

                  Comment

                  • Fedaykin
                    Fueled by Tea
                    • Dec 2005
                    • 5287

                    #89
                    I would think the space will be left empty and any useful easily removed systems taken for the remaining GWS30 shooters in the fleet.

                    In effect an OPV.
                    Because sometimes in life we need a bit of fun

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXNAp3mKepc

                    Comment

                    • sealordlawrence
                      Senior Member
                      • Nov 2004
                      • 6005

                      #90
                      Originally posted by Jonesy View Post
                      Well, there you go, if the USN can run OHP's without their SM1's and Mk13's then, goshdarnit, we can run T42's without GWS30!!!.

                      Sweet Jesus!
                      I can understand the astonishment but to be honest I dont have a massive issue with this, at the end of the day if a real AAW need was suddenly needed there would still be enough of Sea Dart left and PAAMS would be close enough that both could be constituted in a very short time frame. I agree that it is less than ideal but if money is being saved for only a temporary loss of capability at a time when it is not needed then it is not the end of the world.

                      I always felt sorry for the T42's anyway, made as small as possible for reasons of economy and then prevented from being the ships that they could have been through the cancellation of the Type 1030 STIR, Mark-2 Sea Dart and the 4 round Sea Wolf launcher based on the Sea Cat launcher. And they were far cheaper than a T22. A sad tale indeed.

                      Comment

                      • Fedaykin
                        Fueled by Tea
                        • Dec 2005
                        • 5287

                        #91
                        Originally posted by sealordlawrence View Post
                        I can understand the astonishment but to be honest I dont have a massive issue with this, at the end of the day if a real AAW need was suddenly needed there would still be enough of Sea Dart left and PAAMS would be close enough that both could be constituted in a very short time frame. I agree that it is less than ideal but if money is being saved for only a temporary loss of capability at a time when it is not needed then it is not the end of the world.

                        I always felt sorry for the T42's anyway, made as small as possible for reasons of economy and then prevented from being the ships that they could have been through the cancellation of the Type 1030 STIR, Mark-2 Sea Dart and the 4 round Sea Wolf launcher based on the Sea Cat launcher. And they were far cheaper than a T22. A sad tale indeed.
                        Actually has anybody got any pictures of the proposed four round Sea Wolf launcher.

                        I think it was earmarked for the Invincible class as well.
                        Because sometimes in life we need a bit of fun

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXNAp3mKepc

                        Comment

                        • swerve
                          Rank 5 Registered User
                          • Jun 2005
                          • 13591

                          #92
                          Originally posted by Wanshan View Post
                          Expensive little opv you got there, pal!

                          Are they using that freed up space (assuming removal of items) for anything in particular (e.g. special forces) ? Or are they just leaving the magazine/feed system there empty?
                          No removal of systems, AFAIK. Just removal of missiles, either to to other ships or storage on shore, I think.
                          Juris praecepta sunt haec: honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere.
                          Justinian

                          Comment

                          • Jonesy
                            Neo-conversative
                            • Jan 2000
                            • 5097

                            #93
                            Wanshan

                            Expensive little opv you got there, pal!
                            Gee thanks!

                            As I understand it the launchers and the magazine handling gear are going to be landed presumably held as spares for the remaining GWS30 ships. Which does make sense as, otherwise, you would still have to deploy WEA's with GWS30 skillset just in case something broke on the unused, but still powerful, machinery. Wonder if they'll land the 1022 and, at least, the after 909 arrays too?!.

                            Cant see the spaces being modified into anything useful (apart from additional stores space - perhaps) simply as I dont see anyone spending any more money on these boats. Wouldnt mind a swap draft on to one of them though....got to be good contenders for a West Indies deployment soon!.

                            Fedaykin,

                            Actually has anybody got any pictures of the proposed four round Sea Wolf launcher.
                            There was a cracking photo of a LWSW launcher firing on the wall of Sherval Divisions messdeck at Fisguard Sqdn back at HMS Raleigh. Unfortunately I didnt think to try and pinch it!. The Bristol Aerospace Collection at Filton have an exhibit with a LW SeaWolf mockup and, as part of another project, I've asked them if they have a couple of images that they may be willing to send over?.

                            Comment

                            • harryRIEDL
                              Rank 5 Registered User
                              • Jan 2006
                              • 375

                              #94
                              Originally posted by Jonesy View Post
                              Wanshan



                              Gee thanks!

                              As I understand it the launchers and the magazine handling gear are going to be landed presumably held as spares for the remaining GWS30 ships. Which does make sense as, otherwise, you would still have to deploy WEA's with GWS30 skillset just in case something broke on the unused, but still powerful, machinery. Wonder if they'll land the 1022 and, at least, the after 909 arrays too?!.

                              Cant see the spaces being modified into anything useful (apart from additional stores space - perhaps) simply as I dont see anyone spending any more money on these boats. Wouldnt mind a swap draft on to one of them though....got to be good contenders for a West Indies deployment soon!.

                              Fedaykin,



                              There was a cracking photo of a LWSW launcher firing on the wall of Sherval Divisions messdeck at Fisguard Sqdn back at HMS Raleigh. Unfortunately I didnt think to try and pinch it!. The Bristol Aerospace Collection at Filton have an exhibit with a LW SeaWolf mockup and, as part of another project, I've asked them if they have a couple of images that they may be willing to send over?.
                              they are the stubby T42 which are being effected by the change so it could have the side effect of improving the sea keeping of the hull
                              To Be or not TO be That is The Question you all should know the writer of that quote

                              always look on the bright side of life monty python

                              Comment

                              • Jonesy
                                Neo-conversative
                                • Jan 2000
                                • 5097

                                #95
                                Originally posted by harryRIEDL View Post
                                they are the stubby T42 which are being effected by the change so it could have the side effect of improving the sea keeping of the hull

                                Err no. Improving the heavy weather performance of the hull was the whole point of the stretched bows on the Batch3's. They are the only 42's that dont get very, very wet across the bows in the big waves!.

                                Comment

                                • Fedaykin
                                  Fueled by Tea
                                  • Dec 2005
                                  • 5287

                                  #96
                                  I would think the 1022 and 909 would stay, the long range radar is a handy asset even for a ship with no surface to air capability and the 909 are needed for the Mod 8 Gun.

                                  As for the launchers I would think the RN have enough refurbished ones in stores to not warrant taking the mounts off. They will probably allow them to rust in place, also think about the PR aspect a bit embarrasing showing frontline RN warships having their primary weapon system removed.
                                  Because sometimes in life we need a bit of fun

                                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXNAp3mKepc

                                  Comment

                                  • Fedaykin
                                    Fueled by Tea
                                    • Dec 2005
                                    • 5287

                                    #97
                                    Actually whilst I'm thinking about it I hope at least one of the Type 42 are saved as a museum ship.

                                    Certainly some of the survivors are worthy of preservation, maybe its time for a campaign before its too late!
                                    Because sometimes in life we need a bit of fun

                                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXNAp3mKepc

                                    Comment

                                    • orko_8
                                      Reborn Immortal
                                      • Jun 2004
                                      • 553

                                      #98
                                      I don't get it. It says the ships are going to be decommissioned next year. Is this decision -whether removal of launcher or just the missiles- just a budgetary measure? Is RN that desperate not to wait one more year to totally get rid of both the ship and missiles within?

                                      At least USN plans to use the FFG-7's without Mk13 for a couple of more years.
                                      sigpic

                                      Comment

                                      • Jonesy
                                        Neo-conversative
                                        • Jan 2000
                                        • 5097

                                        #99
                                        I would think the 1022 and 909 would stay, the long range radar is a handy asset even for a ship with no surface to air capability and the 909 are needed for the Mod 8 Gun.
                                        If memory serves Southampton has already deployed once without her 1022 operational and the after 909 array could not be employed to direct the Mk8. So, if needed, the radars could be landed with little real impact.

                                        That said, I'm told, Southampton isnt scheduled for any deployments outside of UK waters for, effectively, the rest of her remaining service life. She's been stripped of her CIWS too. Effectively therefore she has been decommissioned from active service - barring a major conflict.

                                        Actually whilst I'm thinking about it I hope at least one of the Type 42 are saved as a museum ship.
                                        There are still a few of the Batch1's in afloat storage at Pompey including HMS Glasgow who's performance in the Falklands merits some accolade. The most sensible ship to pass to the Imperial War Museum would be the Exeter though. Falklands veteran and in better materiel shape than any of the Batch1's. Given the unhappy gestation and birth of the T42's I can think of a few people who might not be too happy to see memories of the 42's lasting after their final demise though!.

                                        Comment

                                        • Unicorn
                                          Antipodean Analyst
                                          • Sep 2005
                                          • 474

                                          The reason that they have not actually removed the missile launching system entirely is that the system forms part of the strength of the shiip, contributing to the stiffness of the main hull girder.

                                          HMAS Canberra had her Mk 13 launcher removed in Sydney for a major service, while the ship returned to Western Australia. The ship was based in Western Australia and it made sense to do more of the refit there, with the crew close to homes and families, rather than 3000 miles away on theother side of the continent.

                                          To cover the area normally occupied by the Mk 13 they basically bolted a steel plate over the hole.

                                          She encountered some rough weather in the Great Australian Bight and the hull, thanks to that great big hole in her forecastle, ended up with both a twist and cracking in the structural members forward.

                                          That is the reason Canberra was paid off early and is currently on her way to be sunk as a dive wreck off Gelong in Victoria as I type this.

                                          I am sure the RN are aware of this incident with Canberra and it may have a bearing in the RN's decision to leave the launcher body intact.

                                          Hope this helps explain the issue.

                                          Unicorn
                                          It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
                                          It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
                                          the lips acquire stains, the stains become a warning.
                                          It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

                                          Comment

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