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LCA Tejas and derivatives news and discussion (reincarnated)

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  • BlackArcher
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Dec 2010
    • 4213

    #61
    LCA Tejas Mk1A

    Twitter link





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    • BlackArcher
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Dec 2010
      • 4213

      #62
      Excellent article on the Tejas Mk2 aka Medium Weight Fighter (MWF) and the thoughts and design considerations that drove choices that have been made for the MWF.

      Tracking the Tejas- The Tejas Mk2 becomes the Medium Weight Fighter

      Quoting only a couple of paras


      In order to overcome the internal space constraints of the Tejas Mk1, MWF has been lengthened to 14.65 m, a sweet spot for a modern single engine multirole fighter. This allows the fighter enough internal volume for carrying the necessary systems, while having enough fuel for the range, endurance and performance requirements. This increase in length is achieved using two plugs, one in the nose, and another behind the cockpit. As both of these plugs are ahead of the wing, the CG shifts forward with respect to the CoL, thereby reducing the static stability margin, or in general terms, the maneuverability of an aircraft. As mentioned above, canards help to compensate for this by shifting the CoL forward proportionally to maintain the same static margin.


      ...


      The shape of the canard was chosen after carefully studying a variety of geometries. Based on published computational fluid dynamic (CFD) studies, the leading edge (LE) sweep is expected to be equal to 50 degees. At this angle, the LE sweep provides an optimal increase in the lift coefficient with a smooth and desirable linear variation in the pitching coefficient at high AoA regimes. These CFD studies were then confirmed using extensive wind tunnel testing. A 1:10 scale wind tunnel model with canards was displayed at Aero India 2019, one of many configurations considered during the design phase. The canards typically have an adverse impact on the directional stability of an aircraft. The designers of MWF have taken measures to improve the directional stability by increasing the height of the tail fin and other measures. The increased height of tail fin is also necessitated by the elongated fuselage.









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      • BlackArcher
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Dec 2010
        • 4213

        #63
        And now NP-1 LCA Navy trainer prototype flies with the arrestor hook integrated



        What a beauty! #LCA- Navys trainer variant NP-1 flew for the first time 2day in Bengaluru in near complete Standard of Preparation with arrestor hook and a pilot controlled Leading Edge Vortex Controller LEVCON. Heads to SBTF Goa for further trials @arunp2810 @indiannavy
        link

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        • BlackArcher
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Dec 2010
          • 4213

          #64
          Just a beautiful pic. Open in a new window to see larger size

          Credit: Angad Singh

          Twitter link

          Weekend pics: 45 Sqn CO Samrath Danny Dhankar heads out for the #Tejas display at Aero India 2019.

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          • Guest's Avatar
            Guest

            #65
            I see some are still living in a "Fantasy World"???


            Sorry, the N-LCA is dead and the Indian Navy has "no intention" of buying it. While, the LCA MKII (i.e. MWF) is nothing but a pipe dream. Mark my words it will "never" see series production....

            Last edited by Scooter; 8th May 2019, 09:24.

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            • BlackArcher
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Dec 2010
              • 4213

              #66
              Naval LCA prototype moves for final phase of shore based trials


              The twin-seat trainer naval variant of the Light Combat Aircraft (LCA-N) is moving to a test facility in Goa for the final phase of its trials even as uncertainty hangs on the future of the project for an indigenous aircraft carrier-based fighter jet.

              In 2017, the Navy cited its unhappiness with the LCA-N programme citing that both Mark 1 and Mark 2 variants were underpowered, to opt for an import of carrier-based fighters.

              The navy is likely to seek requests for proposals (RFP) from western manufacturers of carrier-based jets like the F/A-18 and the Rafale-M later this year. The Navy will spend over Rs 50,000 crore to import the aircraft over the next five years.

              ADA, meanwhile, has continued LCA-N development. Naval Prototype-1 (NP-1) as the trainer variant is called, flew two sorties in Bengaluru on April 24 with two new featuresan arrestor hook and pilot controlled LEVCONs.

              Leading Edge Vortex Controllers(LEVCONs) are flaps that open up on the side of the aircraft like air brakes, allowing the aircraft to reduce landing speeds. Last year, the single-seat fighter variant, NP-2 underwent landing taxi trials at the Shore-Based Test Facility (SBTF) to prove its arrestor hook system.

              ...

              The Navy's decision to import fighter aircraft saw the conversion of the LCA-N into a navy supported technology demonstrator. The ADA project team has used the two prototype aircraft as technology demonstrators to master the two most complex technologies- landing and taking off from a deck less than 200 metres long.

              The project team says that while they have mastered take-off, they are yet to perfect landing the LCA using its arrestor hook which explains the new round of tests in Goa.

              Officials at the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA), the DRDO-organisation that runs the project say if they meet all project, the technology demonstrator project can be closed by the year-end.

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              • Teer
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • May 2009
                • 2428

                #67
                Originally posted by Scooter View Post
                I see some are still living in a "Fantasy World"???


                Sorry, the N-LCA is dead and the Indian Navy has "no intention" of buying it. While, the LCA MKII (i.e. MWF) is nothing but a pipe dream. Mark my words it will "never" see series production....

                LOL, don't know why the LCA has you so butthurt.

                The IAF has asked for the LCA Mk2. It will happen irrespective how much you rant.

                Go troll elsewhere.

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                • Guest's Avatar
                  Guest

                  #68
                  Originally posted by Teer View Post

                  LOL, don't know why the LCA has you so butthurt.

                  The IAF has asked for the LCA Mk2. It will happen irrespective how much you rant.

                  Go troll elsewhere.
                  Really, do the math young man! First, they haven't even built a single "prototype". Which, means it would be another "decade" at least before it would ever reached production. Even that is being "extremely" optimistic consider the countless delays with the LCA Program.


                  This while numerous 5th and 6th Generation Fighter Programs are in development....


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                  • Guest's Avatar
                    Guest

                    #69
                    Yes, the N-LCA is nothing but a "Technology Demonstrator" and will never see series production.......

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                    • BlackArcher
                      Rank 5 Registered User
                      • Dec 2010
                      • 4213

                      #70
                      Naval LCA Mk1 is a Technology Demonstrator. We all knew it for more than a year and half.

                      Naval LCA Mk2 will be the one that the Navy will evaluate to see if it meets its requirements.

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                      • Guest's Avatar
                        Guest

                        #71
                        Originally posted by BlackArcher View Post
                        Naval LCA Mk1 is a Technology Demonstrator. We all knew it for more than a year and half.

                        Naval LCA Mk2 will be the one that the Navy will evaluate to see if it meets its requirements.
                        The N-LCA is dead other that for the use of research. Which, is why the Indian Navy has a tender for "57" foreign Naval Fighters today.

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                        • Spitfire9
                          Rank 5 Registered User
                          • Jul 2008
                          • 2795

                          #72
                          Originally posted by Scooter View Post

                          The N-LCA is dead other that for the use of research. Which, is why the Indian Navy has a tender for "57" foreign Naval Fighters today.
                          Navy already decided it is underpowered and unsuitable.

                          Navy cannot possibly wait for any naval MWF. If it is ever built earliest availabilty will be late 2020's. Vikrant should be ready to go early 2020's. Not much point in driving it around for years without any aircraft, is there?

                          Sum ergo cogito

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                          • halloweene
                            Rank 5 Registered User
                            • Jan 2012
                            • 4233

                            #73
                            There is something i do not like in that plane (air intakes)

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                            • BlackArcher
                              Rank 5 Registered User
                              • Dec 2010
                              • 4213

                              #74
                              Well, the Indian Navy has 45 MiG-29Ks between 2 squadrons. So the MiG-2K is the fighter that will embark upon the INS Vikrant (IAC-1) for the foreseeable future. The choice of a new imported carrier fighter will not be made anytime soon and will not be available for at least 3 years from its selection. So I would assume that even if things went smoothly on that front, we won't see a Rafale M or Super Hornet flying off INS Vikrant till 2025 at least.

                              The IN is going to evaluate the Naval LCA Mk2 fighter, when it is in flight testing. After that, a decision will be made on whether to continue with it or not.

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                              • Guest's Avatar
                                Guest

                                #75
                                Originally posted by Spitfire9 View Post

                                Navy already decided it is underpowered and unsuitable.

                                Navy cannot possibly wait for any naval MWF. If it is ever built earliest availabilty will be late 2020's. Vikrant should be ready to go early 2020's. Not much point in driving it around for years without any aircraft, is there?
                                The Indian Air Force can't wait for the MWF (MK II) either. Which, is why I doubt it will ever be produced....

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                                • Guest's Avatar
                                  Guest

                                  #76
                                  Originally posted by BlackArcher View Post
                                  Well, the Indian Navy has 45 MiG-29Ks between 2 squadrons. So the MiG-2K is the fighter that will embark upon the INS Vikrant (IAC-1) for the foreseeable future. The choice of a new imported carrier fighter will not be made anytime soon and will not be available for at least 3 years from its selection. So I would assume that even if things went smoothly on that front, we won't see a Rafale M or Super Hornet flying off INS Vikrant till 2025 at least.

                                  The IN is going to evaluate the Naval LCA Mk2 fighter, when it is in flight testing. After that, a decision will be made on whether to continue with it or not.
                                  The N-LCA is dead if you care to believe it or not. Yet, I do agree they will operate the Mig-29K's from the Vikrant at least initially. As the Indian Navy has no other option.

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                                  • BlackArcher
                                    Rank 5 Registered User
                                    • Dec 2010
                                    • 4213

                                    #77
                                    Originally posted by Guest View Post

                                    The Indian Air Force can't wait for the MWF (MK II) either. Which, is why I doubt it will ever be produced....
                                    It will be produced. The IAF has a huge fleet of Mirage-2000, MiG-29 and Jaguar fighters that it wants replaced by this Medium Weight Fighter. And the program has the full backing of the IAF with plans being drawn up for the Mk2's capabilities roadmap. Any imported option will not work because of the sheer cost and the comparative lack of gains for local industry.

                                    Read the article below

                                    Importance of LCA programme as flagship for 'Make in India' stressed

                                    The road map and timelines for Tejas capability enhancement and measures to step up its production were also discussed at the conference. PTI

                                    May 03, 2019, 08.38 PM IST




                                    The importance of the LCA programme as the flagship for "Make in India" was stressed here on Friday by Air Officer Commanding-in Chief, Air Marshal Suresh of the Southern Area Command, who called for brainstorming on various aspects of its operational viability.


                                    Speaking after inaugurating the first LCA TEJAS operators conference at the Air Force Station at Sulur on the outskirts, Suresh impressed upon the participants, the need to deliberate at length on further improvements in avionics, radar and other systems for future programme like LCA Mk IA & II and AMCA, while working on Tejas FOC and Mk1.


                                    He expressed confidence that those present at the conference, "the finest brains in military aviation", would utilise the wealth of experience to make further versions of LCA into one of the finest combat platforms in the world.


                                    The road map and timelines for Tejas capability enhancement and measures to step up its production were also discussed at the conference, an official release said here
                                    ..
                                    Last edited by BlackArcher; 20th May 2019, 16:30.

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                                    • BlackArcher
                                      Rank 5 Registered User
                                      • Dec 2010
                                      • 4213

                                      #78


                                      While the Air force Version of Tejas has been the talk of town, the naval version continues with the flight test schedule leading to the ultimate goal. The common question has been on the date when is she going to land on deck. The effort required by the flight test crew even to attempt that is monumental, leave alone the development of the aircraft with the required technologies for that. The foremost thing one should keep in mind while being judgmental about the program is the difference between the two versions in terms of operation, operating envelope and the availability of required technology.
                                      Jai Hind.
                                      From LCA FB page

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                                      • BlackArcher
                                        Rank 5 Registered User
                                        • Dec 2010
                                        • 4213

                                        #79


                                        The Naval LCA continues to undergo the testing. Seen here is the NP-1 during one of the wave-off approach. The test pilots have to master that to achieve the desired sink rate to land on a deck. The task requires at least couple of hundreds of these approaches before the test pilots get and idea on how to achieve that.
                                        From Tejas LCA FB page

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                                        • BlackArcher
                                          Rank 5 Registered User
                                          • Dec 2010
                                          • 4213

                                          #80


                                          The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal BS Dhanoa, is on an official visit to AFS Sulur- 'Home base to Tejas'.
                                          The CAS, interacted with the team 'FLYING DAGGERS' during the visit.

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