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RuAF News and development Thread part 15

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  • TomcatViP
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Nov 2011
    • 6122

    Originally posted by TR1 View Post
    https://lenta.ru/news/2016/12/01/mig31/

    Two MIG-31s made emergency landings in Perm: 1 due to some engine instability, and other due to signal that pressure in breaking fluids was dropping.
    Same flight, Same day?

    Comment

    • TR1
      TR1
      http://tiny.cc/tp8kd
      • Oct 2010
      • 9826

      Same day, one was coming from Novosibirsk to Perm, other (different time) was from the area.
      sigpic

      Comment

      • TomcatViP
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Nov 2011
        • 6122

        Thank you TR1. Interesting.

        Comment

        • TR1
          TR1
          http://tiny.cc/tp8kd
          • Oct 2010
          • 9826

          No problem, hopefully just an unlucky day.

          http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2299148.html

          55th Helicopter Polk @ Korenovsk got some new Ka-52s.





          Ka-52 was also tested in Algeria in 2015 for a potential naval order.



          sigpic

          Comment

          • Austin
            Rank 5 Registered User
            • Oct 2003
            • 6506

            One of Russia's Most Lethal Fighter Jets Has a Strange New Role

            The Russian Aerospace Forces are starting to convert their aerial demonstration team onto the powerful new Sukhoi Su-30SM Flanker-H.

            The Russian Knights aerial demonstration team currently flies the original Su-27 version of the Flanker. But exactly why the Russians would allocate some of their best operational combat aircraft to an aerobatics team is somewhat puzzling. The Su-30SM is gross overkill for a mission that is mostly formation flying over the public at airshows. A cheaper, less sophisticated aircraft such as the Su-30M2 would have made more sense if the Russian military absolutely needed a new frontline fighter to showcase at such events.

            “A second batch of Su-30sm have just arrived in Kubinka from the factory for the Russian Knights,” a Russian defense ministry spokesman told the Moscow-based TASS news agency [3]. “The air group is fully equipped with new fighters for the new training period. Starting on Dec. 1, the pilots will fly the new aircraft.”

            However, while the Russian Knights aerial demonstration team will fly eight Su-30SM fighters, they will retain a number of Su-27s. Presumably with the addition of the thrust-vectoring Su-30SM into the mix, the unit will add new maneuvers to their routine that take advantage of the new jet’s capabilities.

            The U.S. Air Force’s Thunderbirds [4], which are that service’s demonstration team, currently flies the Lockheed Martin F-16C Block 52D version of the Fighting Falcon. Indeed, the Thunderbirds are among the very few active duty Air Force units to fly the Pratt & Whitney F100-powered versions (the F100-PW-229 variant in this case) of the F-16.

            There was a lot of grumbling among U.S. Air Force pilots about Thunderbirds operating some of the newest and most capable F-16s in the service’s inventory when the squadron traded in their older F-16 Block 32 jets. Even the unit’s then-commander agreed that the Thunderbirds did not need those newest frontline aircraft.

            The U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels, [5] meanwhile, operate some of the oldest Boeing F/A-18 Hornets in the fleet. The team is currently in the middle of a transition from the oldest remaining F/A-18A-model jets to the somewhat newer F/A-18C. There are currently three single-seat F/A-18As, one two-seat F/A-18B, ten single-seat F/A-18Cs and a pair of two-seat F/A-18D in the squadron’s inventory.

            It’s possible that the Navy might eventually convert the squadron over to the oldest F/A-18E/F Super Hornets in its inventory. But as a unit whose primary job is to perform at airshows, the Blue Angels are not the first in line to receive top-of-the-line hardware. Combat units always get the first dibs on the most modern hardware in the Navy—it’s a matter of priorities. “While the Super Hornet has more recent technology, the Hornet has been a reliable asset for 30 years, and its many capabilities continue to meet the needs for the demonstration,” as the Blue Angels state on their site.
            "A map does you no good if you don't know where you are"

            Comment

            • TR1
              TR1
              http://tiny.cc/tp8kd
              • Oct 2010
              • 9826

              Pics of the new Ka-52:



































              sigpic

              Comment

              • BlackArcher
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Dec 2010
                • 4361

                beautiful helicopter, the Ka-52.

                Comment

                • haavarla
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Dec 2008
                  • 6715

                  I know this has been posted before.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvP0VsmWCAk&t=377s

                  Mif-31 with go-pro cam.

                  Edit:
                  Fixed the link. And yes it was MILF ))
                  Last edited by haavarla; 3rd December 2016, 18:09.
                  Thanks

                  Comment

                  • Berkut
                    Senior Member
                    • Nov 2011
                    • 2216

                    What is this Mif-31?

                    Comment

                    • JangBoGo
                      Rank 5 Registered User
                      • Jan 2011
                      • 1510

                      Originally posted by Berkut View Post
                      What is this Mif-31?
                      Letter F is adjacent to G on the keyboard.

                      Comment

                      • Lt Anderson
                        Rank 5 Registered User
                        • Oct 2013
                        • 278

                        Originally posted by Berkut View Post
                        What is this Mif-31?
                        Maybe MILF-31? But at 31 it is not a MILF.

                        Comment

                        • Marcellogo
                          Rank 5 Registered User
                          • Jun 2014
                          • 1840

                          Originally posted by Lt Anderson View Post
                          Maybe MILF-31? But at 31 it is not a MILF.

                          For apparent mental age of some poster it would be.

                          Comment

                          • Berkut
                            Senior Member
                            • Nov 2011
                            • 2216

                            Originally posted by JangBoGo View Post
                            Letter F is adjacent to G on the keyboard.
                            And his link actually shows MiG-31 then? Dont see any go-pro involved either.

                            Comment

                            • Austin
                              Rank 5 Registered User
                              • Oct 2003
                              • 6506

                              The volume of the Russian defense orders will be reduced by 5% in 2017 - MIC
                              06/12/2016 8:38:01

                              http://militarynews.ru/story.asp?rid=1&nid=434537
                              Seversk. December 6. Interfax-Siberia - The volume of state defense orders in 2017 will be reduced, according to deputy chairman of the board of the Military-Industrial Commission (MIC) of the Russian Federation Oleg Bochkarev.

                              "The volume of public procurement in 2017 will be 5% less money than in 2016. Yes, probably, it will generally not as noticeable, although the 5% overlap inflation, but, nevertheless, reduction trend is already underway. And after 2020, it will only increase, "- said O.Bochkarev during the Council meeting on the development of defense industry enterprises in Seversk.

                              According to him, businesses operating in the state defense order, in recent years engaged in the modernization of production, increasing the number of civilian products.

                              In turn, the presidential envoy to the Siberian Federal District Sergei Menyailo expressed concern that the state defense order reduction can lead to various problems.

                              "In still a large number of companies, where the share of the state defense order of 90 percent or more is clear that with a decrease in the order will have problems not only economic, but also social." - He said.

                              Earlier, with reference to the Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation Yuri Borisov Harrows reported that the state defense order in Russia will be reduced by 5-7 years. "Just 5-7 years, the volume of public procurement will decrease We will achieve the necessary level of equipment.", - Stated in the Yu.Borisov XV scientific and technical conference on electronics issues in Saratov in September.
                              CH Yu AB
                              "A map does you no good if you don't know where you are"

                              Comment

                              • TR1
                                TR1
                                http://tiny.cc/tp8kd
                                • Oct 2010
                                • 9826

                                sigpic

                                Comment

                                • Flanker_man
                                  Rank 5 Registered User
                                  • Jan 2000
                                  • 3681

                                  Su-35 (T10M) - how old is that photo ???

                                  .... found it! - its says on the original November 2016 - Zhukovskiy.

                                  Didn't know any original Su-35's were still flying - the 5 RK painted ones at Kubinka are just parked up for good AFAIK ?

                                  Ken

                                  PS - Just noticed the nose pitot with AoA vanes - that's new.
                                  Flanker Freak & Russian Aviation Enthusiast.
                                  Flankers (& others) website at :-
                                  http://flankers.co.uk/

                                  Comment

                                  • Austin
                                    Rank 5 Registered User
                                    • Oct 2003
                                    • 6506

                                    Revealed: The US Military's Electronic War Strategy to Counter Russia

                                    The Pentagons soon-to-be published Electronic Warfare strategy calls for increased investment in advanced electronic warfare technology designed to defend U.S. assets and proactively use the electromagnetic spectrum to attack enemies.

                                    DOD officials say the new strategy will be signed and distributed in the next two months, with additional annexes expected to be ready by Summer, 2017. The strategy will be an unclassified document to be shared with U.S. military developers and defense industry officials, Pentagon officials said.

                                    Scout Warrior has learned of some key elements featured in the report, such as increasing EW attack technology, advancing new systems and training and equipping EW forces.

                                    In equipping our forces, we plan to develop advanced electronic attack, advanced electronic warfare support, harden our kill-chains with electronic protection, invest in electromagnetic battle management to manage the numerous assets in the battlespace, Pentagon spokesman Maj. Roger Cabiness told Scout Warrior.

                                    The prospect for a first-of-its kind DOD electronic warfare strategy gained new urgency following Russias successful use of advanced EW technologies in Ukraine, and the pace of global technological progress in the area of EW systems.

                                    Electronic weapons can be used for an increasingly wide range of combat activities from detecting and defending IED attacks to jamming enemy communications or even taking over control of enemy drones, among other things.

                                    Hardening the kill-chain, for example, can involve the use of EW tactics to prevent an armed U.S. drone from being hacked, jammed or taken over by an enemy. Also, EW defenses can better secure radar signals, protect weapons guidance technologies and thwart attacks on larger platforms such as ships, fighter jets and tanks.

                                    The report will also specify cross-geographical boundary radiated energy technologies designed to strengthen U.S. platforms and allied operations, Cabiness added.

                                    The Pentagon strategy calls for efforts to purposely invest in cost-imposing strategies which directly challenge potential adversaries EMS (electromagnetic systems), Cabiness explained.

                                    The concept behind this effort to advance the cost curve and, for example, use less-expensive electromagnetic weapons to destroy, intercept or jam approaching enemy missiles, drones, rockets or aircraft; this is based on the reality that using an electronic weapon is much less expensive than firing an interceptor missile, such as a ship-fired Rolling Airframe Missile or Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile, to destroy an enemy cruise missile. These interceptor missiles, and other ship-defense technologies, can cost up to hundreds of thousands each, if not more.

                                    This tactic would both force enemies to spend money on expensive weapons while decreasing the offensive and defensive weaponry costs to the U.S., therefore advancing a cost-imposing strategy, as Cabiness explained.

                                    Improving electronic warfare modeling and simulation to better prepare for emerging weapons systems is also emphasized as a key element of the strategy. This can help anticipate or train against future weapons applications which may not exist yet, but nevertheless pose an emerging threat.

                                    Authors of the new Electronic Warfare strategy have worked closely with the Pentagon Electronic Warfare Executive Committee, stood up in August 2015.

                                    The purpose of this committee is to translate electromagnetic experimentation into actual capabilities being deployed, as reported by Federal Computer Weekly earlier this year.

                                    The committee is co-chaired by Frank Kendall, the Defense Department's top acquisition official, and Gen. Paul Selva, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

                                    The new strategy is designed to inform and operation alongside existing Army, Navy and Air Force efforts to engineer next-generation electronic warfare systems.

                                    Air Force:


                                    The Air Force is, for example, revving up electronic warfare upgrades for its F-15 fighter to better protect against enemy fire and electronic attacks, service officials said.

                                    Boeing has secured a $478 million deal to continue work on a new technology called with a system called the Eagle Passive Active Warning Survivability System, or EPAWSS.

                                    These updated EW capabilities replace the Tactical Electronic Warfare Suite, which has been used since the 1980s, not long after the F-15 first deployed. The service plans to operate the fleet until the mid-2040s, so an overhaul of the Eagles electronic systems helps maintain U.S. air supremacy, the contract announcement said.

                                    Various upgrades will be complete as early as 2021 for the F-15C AESA (Active Electronically Scanned Array) radar and as late as 2032 for the various EW (electronic warfare) upgrades, Air Force officials said.

                                    The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is also integrated with an AESA radar.

                                    Navy:

                                    The Navy is engineering a new, more powerful, high-tech electronic warfare jamming technology, called the Next-Generation Jammer, designed to allow strike aircraft to destroy enemy targets without being detected by modern surface-to-air missile defenses.

                                    The Next-Generation Jammer, or NGJ, consists of two 15-foot long PODs beneath the EA-18G Growler aircraft designed to emit radar-jamming electronic signals; one jammer goes on each side of the aircraft.

                                    The NGJ departs from existing EW systems in that it can jam multiple frequencies at one time, increasing the scope and effectiveness of attacks. This better enables U.S. aircraft to elude or jam more Russian-built air defenses able to detect aircraft on a wide range of frequencies, such as X-band, VHF and UHF. Russian-built S-300 and S-400 air defenses are believed to be among the best in the world.

                                    Radar technology sends an electromagnetic ping forward, bouncing it off objects before analyzing the return signal to determine a target's location, size, shape and speed...etc. However, if the electromagnetic signal is interfered with, thwarted or "jammed" in some way, the system is then unable to detect the objects, or target, in the same way.

                                    The emerging system uses a high-powered radar technology called Active Electronic Scanned Array, or AESA.

                                    It will be the only AESA-based carrier offensive electronic attack jamming pod it DoD.

                                    The NGJ, slated to be operational by 2021, is intended to replace the existing ALQ 99 electronic warfare jammer currently on Navy Growler aircraft.

                                    The new jammer is designed to interfere with ground-and-air based threats such as enemy fighter jets trying to get a missile "lock" on a target, developers explained.

                                    Army:

                                    The Army is progressing with an EW modernization plan which, among other things, seeks to engineer new systems with an open architecture approach such that they can be efficiently upgraded with new technologies as they emerge. Existing hardware, for instance, can be updated with new software when new enemy higher-tech threats emerge.

                                    Since the beginning of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the emergence of the Improvised Explosive Device (IED) or roadside bomb as a major threat, the Army has succeeded in fielding a host of technologies able to thwart or jam the incoming signal from a Radio-Controlled IED (RCIED), thus delaying or preventing detonation and potential injury to Soldiers.

                                    Some of the jammers fielded during the initial years of the war, such as the vehicle-mounted Duke V2 and Warlock jammers, informed subsequent upgrades designed to defeat a greater range of threat signals. For instance, the Duke V3 vehicle-mounted jammer, now fielded on thousands of vehicles in theater, represents a technological improvement in capability compared to prior systems.

                                    The Thor III is a Soldier-portable counter RCIED jamming device designed to provide a protective envelope for dismounted units on patrol. The device is configured with transceivers mounted on a back-pack-like structure engineered with hardware and software able to identify and jam RF signals operating in a range of frequencies. Thousands of Thor III systems, which in effect create an electromagnetic protective bubble for small units on-the-move, continue to protect Soldiers in theater.

                                    GATOR V2 is a 107-foot retrofitted surveillance tower equipped with transmit and receive antennas designed to identify, detect and disrupt electronic signals. The GATOR V2 is engineered to establish a direction or line of bearing on an electronic signal; it is also configured to use software, digital mapping technology and computer algorithms to geo-locate the origin or location of electronic signals within the battle space.

                                    The Wolfhound is a radio frequency direction-finder engineered to locate enemy command and control nodes. The system, fielded as a QRC in 2009, is able to geo-locate RF transmitters operating in certain frequency bands, thus providing Soldiers with key battle-relevant threat information. Wolfhound can be Soldier or vehicle-mounted.

                                    Kris Osborn became the Managing Editor of Scout Warrior in August of 2015. His role with Scout.com includes managing content on the Scout Warrior site and generating independently sourced original material. Scout Warrior is aimed at providing engaging, substantial military-specific content covering a range of key areas such as weapons, emerging or next-generation technologies and issues of relevance to the military. Just prior to coming to Scout Warrior, Osborn served as an Associate Editor at the Military.com. Osborn previously served at the Pentagon as a Highly Qualified Expert with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army - Acquisition, Logistics & Technology. Osborn has also worked as an anchor and on-air military specialist at CNN and CNN Headline News. This story originally appeared in Scout Warrior.
                                    "A map does you no good if you don't know where you are"

                                    Comment

                                    • Berkut
                                      Senior Member
                                      • Nov 2011
                                      • 2216

                                      Originally posted by Flanker_man View Post
                                      Su-35 (T10M) - how old is that photo ???

                                      .... found it! - its says on the original November 2016 - Zhukovskiy.

                                      Didn't know any original Su-35's were still flying - the 5 RK painted ones at Kubinka are just parked up for good AFAIK ?

                                      Ken

                                      PS - Just noticed the nose pitot with AoA vanes - that's new.
                                      708 and 710 are involved in the T-50 program, as of now only 710 is flying. It has had vanes pitoted radome since atleast 2010...

                                      Comment

                                      • MSphere
                                        Senior Member
                                        • Feb 2010
                                        • 8983

                                        The starboard engine on the #710 has larger diameter, right?

                                        Comment

                                        • Scorpion82
                                          Rank 5 Registered User
                                          • Jul 2005
                                          • 4482

                                          It was used as a testbed for the AL-41F1 iirc. Anyone noticed the 101KS-U type sensor below the tail sting?

                                          Comment

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