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  • djcross
    replied
    Originally posted by haavarla View Post

    wait what!? I thought the F-35 program was the Key to future mission success...
    F-35 was only intended to counter threats for approximately 30 years, with parity in forces occurring in approximately 2030. Threats include evolved S-300 and Su-27, which we see today as S-400/500/HQ-9 and SU-35/57. F-35's short combat radius is its biggest downfall in countering post-2030 threats.

    NGAD is intended to operate over the timespan 2030-2060 against threats which are expected to be introduced at that time period.

    The key takeaway from the article is:
    Design concepts are still classified, but it is expected that stealth-enabled survivability, advanced electronic warfare capabilities, robust sensors, processing power and the ability to share data in a real-time, collaborative fashion will stand as key attributes.

    It is also highly likely that NGAD will not be one specific aircraft. It will likely comprise an integrated system of manned and unmanned aircraft that will integrate networked teaming to deliver desired mission effects.
    "Not one specific aircraft" and "integrated system" means expensive, expensive, expensive. It is definitely not going to be a set of capabilities which poor countries can replicate or counter. Tempest and the DA fighter mockup are yesterday's requirements, not those capable of countering threats in 2030+.
    Last edited by djcross; 24th July 2019, 23:39.

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  • haavarla
    replied
    wait what!? I thought the F-35 program was the Key to future mission success...

    Leave a comment:


  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Youre in partnership with Raytheon on the Iron Dome, as well as some other projects. How is that relationship, and how has it eased the process of being able to work with the United States?

    We have been working in the United States for more than 25 years, and the way that we are doing business and we are very satisfied is that we are working with the tier-one companies. We understand that at the end of the day the U.S. customer would like to see a U.S. entity. When you pick up the phone, you would like to have someone from the United States that will be able to give him the added value of, for example, cybersecurity and other classified issues.

    So we are working with Northrup Grumman for more than 25 years on the Litening [targeting pod]. We are working with Raytheon on Iron Dome and Davids Sling. Were working with BAE Systems on the remote control weapon system for the Navy. We are working with Lockheed Martin for our missiles and our Spice. So in a sense we understand that you have to work with those partners.

    Speaking of Davids Sling, I know Rafael was asked by Switzerland to participate in a competition for missile defense, Davids Sling being the specific system the country was interested in. Rafael decided not to do that. Can you explain?

    I wouldnt say that Rafael decided not to do this, and I cant get into all the details. As a matter of fact, the request was sent to the Israeli government.

    And there was some contact between the Israeli government and Switzerland. Unfortunately, it didnt work, but I hope well still have an opportunity to do something like this in the future.

    Can you elaborate on what happened?

    I might have some assumption, but I prefer not to share it with you.
    https://www.defensenews.com/top-100/...ort-potential/

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  • TomcatViP
    replied
    The US Air Forces Next Generation Air Dominance program is key to mission success


    By: Lt. Gen. David Deptula (ret.) and Doug Birkey
    Source:
    https://www.defensenews.com

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  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) has yet to receive word that its FA-50 has been selected in an Argentinian requirement for light fighters.

    A person familiar with the requirement says that no confirmation has been received, and that the deal, if concluded, would cover eight aircraft.

    Recent media reports suggest that the FA-50 has been selected, but the number given for the requirement is 10 aircraft.
    https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...-fa-50-459862/

    Leave a comment:


  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Russian plane involved appears to be a Beriev A-50!

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/24/w...sia-plane.html

    Leave a comment:


  • J-20
    replied
    Originally posted by TomcatViP View Post
    Instead of accepting offset for a dozen of chosen student to go in France (what for, really?), they should push for Safran to support their product (even if it means a Safran engine) Alternatively Israel can, very much, do the trick and find an opportunity to sale AWAC, Tanker and Drones

    Teja, as stated years earlier is the perfect fighter for some NATO countries that have tight budgets.
    Nah. These poor Nato countries would not receive their Tejas until like 2030 or something.
    The correct fighter for poor European countries is the FA-50 Golden Eagle. same engine as Tejas
    and even Iraq and the Philippines can afford them. So if they can afford them, surely Bulgaria can.

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  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Instead of accepting offset for a dozen of chosen student to go in France (what for, really?), they should push for Safran to support their product (even if it means a Safran engine) Alternatively Israel can, very much, do the trick and find an opportunity to sale AWAC, Tanker and Drones

    Teja, as stated years earlier is the perfect fighter for some NATO countries that have tight budgets.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spitfire9
    replied
    Originally posted by TomcatViP View Post
    Time for India and the Teja to jump in.

    Source
    https://uk.reuters.com/
    I think India needs all the Tejas it can produce ASAP.

    In any event India needs to organise effective support for Tejas export orders before accepting any. Getting an order then demonstrating to other potential export customers that you cannot provide post-sales support is a very stupid thing to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Bulgaria president vetoes $1.26 billion deal for F-16 fighter jets

    Radev, a former air force commander, said the sharp disputes in parliament during the debate on its ratification showed that public consensus on the contracts had been neither sought nor achieved.

    Because of the shortened legislative procedure, a number of important issues such as prices, warranties, delivery times, penalties, indemnities, and so on, have remained unclear, he said.

    The commitment of the Republic of Bulgaria to obligations, for years to come, without a national consensus and conviction in the mutually acceptable conditions of the treaty, is extremely worrying, Radev said in a statement.
    [...]
    The ruling centre-right GERB party defended the contracts and expressed its readiness for another vote at a parliamentary session on Friday. Parliament could overrule Radevs veto with a vote of at least 121 votes in the 240-seat assembly.

    We have a consensus that we need to modernise (Bulgarias) armed forces, Konstantin Popov, chair of parliamentary defence committee, said. The F-16 is a wonderful airplane.
    Time for India and the Teja to jump in.

    Source
    https://uk.reuters.com/
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 23rd July 2019, 19:00.

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  • TomcatViP
    replied
    South Korea fires warning shots at Russia warplanes

    South Korea's Defense Ministry says multiple Russian military planes violated the South Korean airspace off its east coast on Tuesday.

    The ministry says South Korea launched fighter jets and that they fired warning shots.
    Also
    According to the South Korean military, the Russian aircraft [...] violated South Korean airspace over Dokdo an island that is occupied by South Korea and also claimed by Japan, which calls it Takeshima just after 9 a.m. (midnight GMT Monday).
    Officials said South Korean F-15k and F-16k jets were scrambled to intercept one of the planes and fired flares after sending a message to the aircraft.

    The Russian plane left the area above disputed islets but it returned and violated the airspace again, the ministry official said. He said the South Korean fighter jets fired warning shots again. The Russian plane did not return fire in either incident, the official said.

    The South Korean military took tactical action including dropping flares and firing a warning shot, a defence ministry statement said.

    It was the first time a Russian military plane violated South Korean airspace, according to South Korean officials.
    Source:
    https://www.militarytimes.com/
    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/23/s-ko...-airspace.html
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...pace-violation
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 23rd July 2019, 05:28.

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  • TomcatViP
    replied
    U.S. military: Venezuelan fighter jet shadowed Navy aircraft | Miami Herald

    https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article232945492.html

    Leave a comment:


  • TomcatViP
    replied
    RIAT 2019 in 3min:

    Last edited by TomcatViP; 21st July 2019, 21:56.

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  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Northrop Grumman reveals the first two customers for its Firebird intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft

    Northrop named US operators Grand Sky Development and Tenax Aerospace as each having signed deals to acquire the Firebird.
    Those are more civilian operators obviously but still this is an interesting market outreach that could ready the stage for a future ISR military acquisition

    Brian Chappel, the companys senior vice-president and general manager autonomous systems, told FlightGlobal that it sees a clear need in Europe for the multi-intelligence, long-endurance capabilities offered by Firebird.

    As Europe recognises [the need] and invests more into ISR, everything cant be big and exquisite you are going have to have a range of capabilities, Chappel says. Governments and militaries in Europe, the Middle East, the Far East, all those are very interesting opportunities, and weve finding interest already.
    The Barkhane ISR operation in Mali for example would be greatly eased with such optionally manned platform able to transit over long distance in regulated airspace in order to be re positioned quickly at minimal deployment and infrastructure cost.



    Chappel says the aircraft could be supplied for less than $10 million for manned operations, with this price rising to around $20 million in fully unmanned guise. The optionally piloted version on static display at RIAT can be converted for unmanned operations by two people in less than 4h, he notes.
    Source:
    FlightGlobal.com
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 21st July 2019, 13:51.

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  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Originally posted by pilatus View Post
    Italians find Qatari Matra super 530 F in raid on right wing extremists.
    More details here:
    https://theaviationist.com/2019/07/1...neo-nazi-gang/

    Based on the markings, the missile is an R.530 F20 version with serial number 5284, belonging to the production lot 83 and sold to the Government of Qatar on Oct. 10, 1980.

    The missile is marked as a live (not inert) as shown by the presence of a yellow band, that is used to highlight the presence of an explosive warhead, and a red band, meaning the presence of rocket fuel; however, during the inspection, it was found that the warhead was missing. The Police didnt provide additional details about the fuel and the guidance section.

    The Super 530 missiles were meant to arm the 14 Mirage F1EDA fighters bought the same year by the Qatar Emiri Air Force. The F20 version was specifically designed to be carried by Mirage F1, while the D version was designed to be carried by the newer Mirage 2000. In 1994 Qatar replaced the Mirage F1 with the Mirage 2000, selling its old fighters to Spain and the Super 530 missile to an unknown nation.
    [...]


    Qatar foreign ministry spokeswoman Lolwah Alkhater said in a statement: The authorities in Qatar have immediately started an investigation alongside the respective Italian authorities and the authorities of another friendly nation to which the Matra missile was sold 25 years ago. The captured Matra Super530 missile was sold by Qatar in the year 1994 in a deal that included 40 Matra Super 530 missiles to a friendly nation that wishes not to be named at this point of the investigation. Qatar is working very closely now with the pertinent parties including Italy to unveil the facts and it is very concerned as to how a missile sold 25 years ago ended up in the hands of a third non-state party.
    Source:
    The Aviationist.com
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 21st July 2019, 09:01.

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  • barongan
    replied
    I love this thread, good info

    Leave a comment:


  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Originally posted by djcross View Post
    Unacceptably low readiness metrics will continue.
    The Navy Hornet fleet did better than many other lately.

    But here is a more extensive article from USNI:
    https://news.usni.org/2019/04/05/42436

    And another from DefeneNews:
    https://www.defensenews.com/digital-...ll-struggling/
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 20th July 2019, 15:22.

    Leave a comment:


  • djcross
    replied
    [QUOTE=TomcatViP;n3868465]Naval Aviation Enterprise Naval Sustainment System O-Level Reform


    The Naval Sustainment System aims to improve readiness across the Naval Aviation Enterprise. To meet that challenge, the fleet is reforming maintenance at the Operational Level by finding efficiencies and implementing industry best practices to get combat-ready aircraft back to the flight line.
    Lipstick on a pig...

    This "reform" means nothing if Navy isn't willing consolidate the multitude of stove piped skills into three skillsets:
    1. Mechanic - responsible for mechanical and structural maintenance
    2. Technician - responsible for avionics and mission systems maintenance
    3. Ordnance - responsible for weapons racks/launchers and loading ordnance

    But Navy won't consolidate because doing so would eliminate too many rice bowls. Unacceptably low readiness metrics will continue.

    Leave a comment:


  • TomcatViP
    replied
    Naval Aviation Enterprise Naval Sustainment System O-Level Reform

    The Naval Sustainment System aims to improve readiness across the Naval Aviation Enterprise. To meet that challenge, the fleet is reforming maintenance at the Operational Level by finding efficiencies and implementing industry best practices to get combat-ready aircraft back to the flight line.
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 20th July 2019, 14:08.

    Leave a comment:


  • LMFS
    replied
    India is planning to upgrade its su-30MKI in Russia
    According to the chief air Marshal of the Indian air force, the aircraft was operated without the modernization of about 20 years.




    In the Indian air force has told about the readiness to modernize its fleet of su-30MKI fighter in the Russian Federation. This was announced by the chief of staff of the Indian air force air chief Marshal Birender Singh Dhanoa.
    "We have requested from the Russian side the proposals for modernization in accordance with current needs," he said.
    The commander also noted that the Indian side is satisfied with the upgrade program of the MiG-21, MiG-27 and MiG-29. According to the results of the military exercises, the Indian air force was satisfied with the result.
    "There is therefore now considering the possibility of modernization of the su-30, which operated about 20 years. Accordingly, their avionics and weapons systems also require modernization," - said the Marshal.

    tvzvezda.ru/news/forces/content/201971913-KaK9v.html

    Leave a comment:

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