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Helicopter take off vertically, what is the maximum height ever acheived?

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  • hampden98
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Sep 2009
    • 2559

    Helicopter take off vertically, what is the maximum height ever acheived?

    While watching the Chinook display this year and amazed at the take of and vertical climb out manoeuvre
    it performs I was wondering if there is a record for helicopter take off and go straight up maximum height achieved ?
    Last edited by hampden98; 21st September 2015, 11:28.
  • Robbiesmurf
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Jul 2014
    • 587

    #2
    I know a French helicopter pilot reached over 40,000ft. The engine flamed-out which ended the attempt.
    If he did that direct from take-off I don't know.

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    • Gerard
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Aug 2009
      • 3176

      #3
      not a answer to your question but ...
      http://www.helis.com/featured/world_records.php


      edit! It might be the answer to your question. The Lama has skids so a rolling/sliding start is unlikely
      Last edited by Gerard; 21st September 2015, 13:27.
      For Roundels of the World: http://www.drareg.nl/Markeringen/index.html or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/481843655359127/

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      • Cherry Ripe
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Jul 2009
        • 564

        #4
        I can't find details online but I believe the vertical record was set in Iran in the mid-1970s with a 214 whilst Bell staff were training IIAA pilots. When empty the 214s could climb vertically at thousands of feet per minute.

        Edit: http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchi...0-%200951.html

        The Lama that holds the absolute altitude record did lift vertically but transitioned to an inclined climb. The flame-out was due to lack of fuel, they had only loaded sufficient to achieve the desired altitude and there was no intention ( or possibility ) of relighting the engine at that height.
        Last edited by Cherry Ripe; 23rd September 2015, 08:58.

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        • hampden98
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Sep 2009
          • 2559

          #5
          Originally posted by Cherry Ripe View Post
          I can't find details online but I believe the vertical record was set in Iran in the mid-1970s with a 214 whilst Bell staff were training IIAA pilots. When empty the 214s could climb vertically at thousands of feet per minute.

          Edit: http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchi...0-%200951.html

          The Lama that holds the absolute altitude record did lift vertically but transitioned to an inclined climb. The flame-out was due to lack of fuel, they had only loaded sufficient to achieve the desired altitude and there was no intention ( or possibility ) of relighting the engine at that height.
          Very interesting. Did they do an auto-rotative landing? Sounds a tad dicey.

          Comment

          • Robbiesmurf
            Rank 5 Registered User
            • Jul 2014
            • 587

            #6
            It did auto-rotate. It is also the holder of the record of longest auto-rotation..

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