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  • djcross
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Jan 2000
    • 5404

    It's the 1960s vintage variable geometry inlet to optimize pressure recovery at various air speeds and altitudes. It is about engine performance, not flight control.

    Comment

    • bring_it_on
      2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
      • Jun 2004
      • 12479

      ViSAR: A 235 GHz radar for airborne applications

      https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8378797

      This radar, developed under the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) ViSAR (Video Synthetic Aperture Radar) program operates at 235 GHz over multiple GHz of bandwidth and provides high resolution, video SAR imagery at a very low frame latency to support real time operations. The imagery is generated at a high refresh rate which provides the operator, whether on a manned platform or remotely piloted unmanned air vehicle (UAV) tactical situational awareness of moving targets or changes to stationary scene content. The system was flight tested onboard a DC-3 aircraft and flown in a variety of environmental conditions. The test results produced exceptional SAR imagery and ground moving target indicator (GMTI) detections to validate many model based assumptions about the operation and RF performance in this frequency band.
      The DARPA ViSAR program objective is to integrate state of the art technologies and demonstrate an airborne sensor that can engage ground areas of interest in all weather conditions. A sub-Terahertz (THz) radar like the ViSAR system provides the cloud penetrating capability to allow sensor operation under all weather conditions, particularly through the cover of clouds. Fig. 1 is a notional scenario from an AC-130 looking through clouds.

      The system is designed with flexible waveforms and a low latency signal processing architecture to support real-time operations. The Raytheon team along with a team of world class subsystem providers developed, integrated, and tested the world's first 235 GHz Airborne Video Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system. A successfully executed flight campaign demonstrated key system capabilities and performance metrics.

      Key Performance Parameters


      The ViSAR System is designed to meet latency, frame rate, image quality, and target detection objectives while operating under all weather conditions.

      High Frame Rate, Low Image Latency

      This metric drives the algorithm suite, signal processing architecture, and the throughput capability of the processor hardware. The imaging geometry and short SAR aperture times at 235 GHz requires minimal data formatting with low order autofocus to produce high quality images. Given the processing throughput capabilities of the FPGA processors, the algorithms are sized to perform all required signal processing in real time

      Fine SAR Resolution

      The transmit pulse bandwidth is sized to achieve a fine range resolution in the ground plane. Given the short frame rate requirement, square image pixels in the ground plane at a slant range of 4 km are generated using an airborne demonstration platform which can exceed ground speeds of 80 m/s.






      Will ViSAR Revolutionize Close Air Support?


      Soldiers slogging it out on the ground will get a much-needed boost when Video Synthetic Aperture Radar (ViSAR) technology takes the field. The miniaturized extremely high-frequency band (EHF) sensor, developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), promises uninterrupted imaging of moving and stationary ground targets when sensors are blinded by the dust and smoke of battle or when clouds obscure their view.

      Now a flight-tested prototype, ViSAR aims to close these gaps and provide tactical situational awareness targeting information and battle damage assessment throughout an engagement. The problem with close air support today is that, once an engagement starts, the aircraft cant see. AC-130 gunships, for example, typically use infrared (IR) sensors to target and engage maneuvering forces on the ground.

      But once an action begins, infrared sensors are unable to image through the dust caused by explosions and incoming rounds, according to the ViSAR broad area announcement (BAA) dated Dec. 19, 2012.

      The programs biggest achievement was the physical implementation of a working prototype that fits into a compact tactical gimbal, known as the Multi-Spectral Targeting System-B (MTS-B), said George Nowak, ViSAR program manager in DARPAs strategic technology office. DARPA also had to develop hardware and image-processing software that works at the high end of the EHF band, which extends from 30 to 300 GHz. Northrop Grumman developed the exciter subsystem, L3 the high power amplifier, and Technical Service Corp. the processing algorithms, while Raytheon was the systems integrator.

      DARPA has not publicly identified which military aircraft will be first to try ViSAR technology as it cycles through further development and testing and into the field. But the agency said that eligible platforms will host a complete battle management system capable of real-time target engagement as well as the 20-inch-diameter, moveable electro-optical/IR MTS-B gimbal or a gimbal of similar size. The BAA cited the AC-130 gunship as the primary transition path for this effort.

      But the DC-3 flight test to proof SAR electronics, pointing, data collection and processing systems used geometries that are relevant to a range of potential transition platforms, Nowak said. The BAA language, he clarified, was intended to provide guidance to potential bidders as to the desired form factor and size of the system. Although the ViSAR development program concluded at the end of 2017, DARPA continues to tweak the design to improve the data presentation so visualization gets closer to the natural visualization provided by electro-optical and IR sensors, Nowak said.

      Future automatic target recognition and datalink applications may also be possible.

      More at the link below:

      https://www.aviationtoday.com/2018/0...e-air-support/


      Here's an image of the MTS-B sensor for size:

      Last edited by bring_it_on; 2nd December 2018, 15:16.
      Old radar types never die; they just phased array

      Comment

      • bring_it_on
        2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
        • Jun 2004
        • 12479

        USAF Funds Lockheeds Half-Raam Missile Flights

        The U.S. Air Force has funded a flight test demonstration program for Lockheed Martins Cuda air-to-air missile, pushing the concept forward more than five years after it first appeared, the company ...

        The flight tests, funded by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), will evaluate how the Cuda compares to the range and terminal phase maneuverability of the Raytheon AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-To-Air Missile (Amraam), says Frank St. John, executive vice-president of Lockheeds Missiles and Fire Control business area.

        http://aviationweek.com/awindefense/...issile-flights

        Meanwhile, Jane's reports that Lockheed Martin has begun testing the CUDA for future SHORAD use case of the US Army.

        Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control on 14 November conducted a successful initial ballistic flight test of its new M-SHORAD Future Interceptor from a Stryker Maneuver SHORAD Launcher (MSL) at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico.

        The M-SHORAD Future Interceptor leverages Lockheed Martin and government technology investment in a 6 ft-class hit-to-kill interceptor designed to defeat unmanned aircraft systems (UASs), fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, and cruise missiles.

        "The 5 inch diameter interceptor fits in the same envelope as the AGM-114L Longbow Hellfire missile currently being integrated on the MSL for the US Army's Stryker-based interim manoeuvre SHORAD [short-range air-defence] capability, and provides significantly more range and manoeuvrability," a Lockheed Martin spokesperson told Jane's .

        More: https://www.janes.com/article/84936/...re-interceptor
        Old radar types never die; they just phased array

        Comment

        • TomcatViP
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Nov 2011
          • 5959

          Interestingly Northrop is designing the EHF exciter for the ViSAR. Shall we understand that this is a fall-out of another program?

          Comment

          • bring_it_on
            2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
            • Jun 2004
            • 12479

            The ViSAR program has largely concluded. Northrop designed, built and delivered the equipment some time ago and they tested ViSAR last year.
            Old radar types never die; they just phased array

            Comment

            • TomcatViP
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Nov 2011
              • 5959

              I should have written "As Northrop was designing the EHF exciter for the ViSAR, is there a chance that this was a fall-out of another program and that a larger version of the ViSAR is embarked on another platform?"
              Sorry my bad.
              Last edited by TomcatViP; 4th December 2018, 12:08.

              Comment

              • bring_it_on
                2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
                • Jun 2004
                • 12479

                B-21 Clears Critical Design Review

                The Northrop Grumman B-21 Raider has cleared its critical design review.

                This ensures the system can proceed into fabrication, demonstration, and test, and certifies it can meet the stated performance requirements within the cost, schedule and risk parameters.

                U.S. Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson told reporters here on Dec. 1 that the highly-classified B-21 stealth bomber is on schedule and she is pleased with how the program is unfolding...

                http://aviationweek.com/awindefense/...-design-review
                Old radar types never die; they just phased array

                Comment

                • bring_it_on
                  2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
                  • Jun 2004
                  • 12479

                  Not directly USAF related but still interesting given that the early fielding for the LB is now planned just 36 or so months after IOC for the MB pods. NG is now working on two of the most important US Navy Electronic Attack programs in the SEWIP Block III and the Next Gen Jammer Low Band (still competing). Northrop is currently flying its EA payload on a CRJ-700.

                  Northrop Grumman Announces Next Generation Jammer-Low Band Team

                  BALTIMORE Nov. 28, 2018 Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) has teamed with Harris Corporation and Comtech PST for the U.S. Navys Next Generation JammerLow Band (NJG-LB) Demonstration of Existing Technologies (DET). The Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) awarded Northrop Grumman a $35 million, 20-month contract Oct. 25 to demonstrate existing jammer capability for the NJG-LB program. Northrop Grumman is the airborne electronic attack integrator for the Navys current EA-18G Growler electronic warfare (EW) system.

                  Harris Corporation is providing cutting-edge electronic attack equipment developed at its North Amityville, New York, operation to Northrop Grumman for NGJ-LB DET. Comtech PST, a subsidiary of Comtech Telecommunications based in Melville, New York, is providing high-power radio frequency (RF) amplifier systems.

                  The Northrop Grumman team brings extensive electronic warfare expertise and a long history of building and deploying systems that support the challenging carrier-based aviation environment. We are proud to be working with Comtech and Harris to help the Navy maintain its warfighting edge, said Paul Kalafos, vice president, surveillance and electromagnetic maneuver warfare, Northrop Grumman.

                  Harris equipment is integrated within Northrop Grummans NGJ-LB pod system to provide a modular, scalable and reconfigurable capability that will allow the Navy to stay current with rapidly evolving threats. Harris draws on its expertise in coherent electronic attack technologies and deployed jamming techniques.

                  Harris is a leader in EW solutions worldwide and has extensive experience with the EA-18G Growler. Our significant investments in open architecture systems are ready made for the U.S. Navy NGJ-LB DET, said Ed Zoiss, president, Harris Electronic Systems. Our work on NGJ-LB also advances the companys strategy to extend into new EW markets through pods and unmanned systems.

                  Comtech is very pleased to be part of the Northrop Grumman team. Our long standing relationship and position as a premier provider of high power RF systems positions the team well to support the Next Generation Jammer program for years to come. We look forward to a very successful partnership, said Michael Hrybenko, president, Comtech PST.

                  The NGJ system will augment, and ultimately replace the EA-18G Growler aircrafts legacy ALQ-99 tactical jammer system with advanced airborne electronic attack capabilities for defeating increasingly advanced and capable threats. Developed in three frequency-focused increments high-, mid- and low-band NGJ will bring a significant increase in airborne electronic attack capability to counter complex air defense and communications systems.

                  https://news.northropgrumman.com/new...-low-band-team
                  Last edited by bring_it_on; 9th December 2018, 15:07.
                  Old radar types never die; they just phased array

                  Comment

                  • bring_it_on
                    2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
                    • Jun 2004
                    • 12479

                    I should have written "As Northrop was designing the EHF exciter for the ViSAR, is there a chance that this was a fall-out of another program and that a larger version of the ViSAR is embarked on another platform?"
                    That is highly unlikely. DARPA gets involved on demonstrations and development programs where they pick up technology at entry level TRL and take it to TRL-6/7 before transitioning it off to one of the services or another agency (NSA, MDA etc etc). Given they were involved in this program, had planned it, floated a BAA, picked a team and then partnered with the AFRL to conduct a full fledged flight demonstration suggests that this was a project that they wanted to mature before handing it off to the USAF which they did last year. It will be interesting to see where this sensor transitions to and whether they choose to go to a UAV application or still focus on the AC-130.

                    DARPA does not usually get into taking capability from one platform or application and re-applying it on another (though there are exceptions like the LRASM). That is the domain of agencies like the SCO or the services directly. It wouldn't be a very smart use of DARPA's resources.
                    Last edited by bring_it_on; 9th December 2018, 16:32.
                    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

                    Comment

                    • bring_it_on
                      2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
                      • Jun 2004
                      • 12479

                      Couldn't find this in the last few pages. I guess it is turning out that XA-100/101 will be the proof of concept engines with a transition focus on the F-35 and quite likely the B-21 bomber with an eye of maturing technology for the PCA/NGAD. AETP basically funds full up engine prototypes for all the technology development work that has been funded by the USDOD and contractors through IR&D under ADVENT, and AETD programs along with several smaller narrow focus technology development efforts again both government funded and in house.

                      The most recent (mid-2018) awards take that technology forward with an eye of developing follow on engines for the Air-Force's Penetrating Counter Air (PCA) platform, and possibly the Navy's F/A-XX effort. The PCA should be looking to enter Milestone-A in the next 12 or so months which is consistent with the FY19-FY-23 funding allocation to it by the USAF ($10 Billion, not counting engine work). AETP was about a $2 Billion RDT&E effort, and this current follow on effort is a $900 Million enhancement to the effort, exclusively focused on 6th gen. programs. PBFY20 should shed more light on these efforts.

                      USAF starts work on defining adaptive engine for future fighter

                      US Air Force officials have taken the first concrete step towards defining a new class of adaptive jet engines to power the next generation of combat aircraft that come after the Lockheed Martin F-35.

                      A $437 million contract modification awarded to GE Aviation on 29 June also draws the first sharp line between an ongoing effort to develop a 45,000lb-thrust adaptive engine replacement for the F-35 fleet and a follow-on series of engines designed for the still-undefined aircraft that will replace the Lockheed F-22.

                      Pratt & Whitney, the powerplant supplier for the F-35 and F-22, also is expected to receive a similarly sized contract modification to develop a competing engine design for a future air superiority aircraft.

                      Both GE and P&W are already working on a related but separate development effort called the Adaptive Engine Transition Programme (AETP). The AETP was described when it was announced in 2016 as an effort to develop and test adaptive engines for a sixth-generation fighter propulsion system, with the possibility of re-engining the F-35 with a more powerful and fuel efficient alternative to the P&W F135.

                      But the new award clarifies that the competing AETP engines embodied by GEs XA100 and P&Ws XA101 demonstrators are focused on a potential bid to re-engine the F-35 in the mid-2020s.

                      The new contract modification for GE, meanwhile, funds next generation adaptive propulsion risk reduction for air superiority applications, the Department of Defense states in the 29 June contract award.


                      In an interview with FlightGlobal, Dan McCormick, GEs general manager for the Advanced Combat Engine Programme, agrees that the AETP demonstrators are F-35 design-centric. The new programme awarded in June is aimed at the next generation of aircraft, he says.

                      In keeping with the USAFs secretive approach to defining the next air superiority fighter, critical details of the new programme including its work scope and name are not released.


                      There is a significant amount of design work planned in the programme, McCormick offers. Because of its classification, I cant talk about detailed content.

                      It is clear that the unnamed programme features adaptive engine technology. In this context, that means an engine that can vary the volume of air flow that bypasses the core. By opening a third stream of air flow in cruise mode, the USAF believes such an architecture can improve specific fuel consumption of the engine by 25%, increasing range and reducing in-flight refueling requirements.

                      The USAF and the US Navy have been pursuing adaptive engine technology since the launch of the Adaptive Versatile Engine Technology (ADVENT) programme in 2007. The follow-on adaptive engine technology demonstrator (AETD) programme started in 2012. Four years later, GE and P&W started to work on the AETP demonstrators.

                      GE plans to deliver the XA100 demonstrators first engine to test next year under the AETP programme, McCormick says. In addition to adaptive bypass airflow, the XA100 will feature ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) in the rotating high pressure turbine blades, allowing GE to use higher temperatures or reduce cooling loads in the engine design.

                      https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...or-fut-450053/
                      GE's official press announcement at the time of the award


                      GE, along with the U.S. Air Force, has matured the enabling technologies and architectures of adaptive cycle engines through a series of highly-successful design and test activities in the Adaptive Versatile Engine Technology (ADVENT), Adaptive Engine Technology Development (AETD), and Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP) efforts. Between 2007 and 2017, GE successfully designed and tested multiple three-stream adaptive fan configurations, an advanced compressor rig, two full-scale core engines, and a full three-stream adaptive cycle technology demonstrator engine. GEs understanding of adaptive cycle engines is based on this solid foundation of testing.

                      Engine, component and core test data has validated the revolutionary capability afforded by this class of technologies and adaptive architectures. Our adaptive cycle engine design and test learnings over the past decade will be leveraged in this recent contract award, Dan McCormick said. We are proud and excited to be part of the U.S. Air Force team moving this new class of advanced propulsion forward towards eventual production and fielding.

                      https://www.geaviation.com/press-rel...e-cycle-engine

                      Elsewhere, the geniuses at the CBO have already put together a cost estimate even before the program has entered Milestone-A review : https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018...force-fighter/
                      Last edited by bring_it_on; 15th December 2018, 17:45.
                      Old radar types never die; they just phased array

                      Comment

                      • bring_it_on
                        2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
                        • Jun 2004
                        • 12479

                        Lockheed Martin's Long Range Anti-Ship Missile Reaches Early Operational Capability (EOC) Status On U.S. Air Force B-1B

                        Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) has delivered the first Long Range Anti-Ship Missiles (LRASM) to U.S. Air Force operational units, achieving Early Operational Capability (EOC) status ahead of schedule.

                        After successfully completing the required integration, flight testing and modeling and simulation, warfighters accepted the first of many tactical production units, meeting key criteria for the EOC declaration milestone.

                        "This event is the culmination of successful partnerships with the U.S. Air Force, Navy and DARPA," said David Helsel, LRASM director at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. "This milestone serves as a great example of collaboration to bring critical capabilities to the warfighter at accelerated acquisition timelines."

                        LRASM is designed to detect and destroy specific targets within groups of ships by employing advanced technologies that reduce dependence on intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms, network links and GPS navigation in contested environments. LRASM will play a significant role in ensuring military access to operate in open ocean/blue waters, owing to its enhanced ability to discriminate and conduct tactical engagements from extended ranges.

                        LRASM is a precision-guided, anti-ship standoff missile based on the successful Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile Extended Range. It is designed to meet the needs of U.S. Navy and Air Force warfighters in contested environments. The air-launched variant, integrated onboard the U.S. Air Force's B-1B, provides an early operational capability meeting the offensive anti-surface warfare Increment I requirement. LRASM is on schedule to achieve EOC on the U.S. Navy's F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in 2019.

                        https://news.lockheedmartin.com/2018...Air-Force-B-1B
                        Old radar types never die; they just phased array

                        Comment

                        • bring_it_on
                          2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
                          • Jun 2004
                          • 12479

                          Pentagon To Request $1.2 Billion for New Boeing F-15 Fighters

                          The Pentagon is planning to request $1.2 billion for 12 Boeing F-15 X fighter aircraftthe newest version of the decades-old jetin its fiscal year 2020 budget request, according to two people familiar with the decision who asked not to be named because its not yet official.

                          The decision to buy the newest kind of F-15 aircraft, so far only sold to U.S. allies, comes from the Pentagons top leadership, including with some prodding from Deputy Secretary of Defense Pat Shanahan, and not the Air Force, which would be flying the planes, the two people said. Shanahan, a former Boeing Co. executive, recused himself from any decisions related to Boeing when he was confirmed by the Senate.

                          But an administration official, who asked not to be named, said Shanahan doesnt make decisions on Boeing programs. The official wouldnt confirm the budget request, and none of the budget decisions are final until the Pentagon submits its request on Feb. 4.


                          The reason for buying the F-15X aircraft would be to start replacing the F-15 C variants for the Air National Guard, which have become to expensive to overhaul, one of the people said. Production of the C variants ended in the 1980, said Richard Aboulafia, an expert on military aircraft and vice president of the Teal Group, a consulting firm.

                          Boeing builds the F-15 in St. Louis, where it also builds the Super Hornets, an aircraft that has benefited from congressional largesse over the last several years. Boeing has kept the F-15 design current, said Aboulafia.

                          They have been able to do that because of sales to Korea, Singapore, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar, he said in a telephone interview, adding that the planes have new systems and sensors.

                          The F-15 is kind of in a class by itself in range and performance, Aboulafia said. Its faster, carries a lot more and can go a lot farther than the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the newest and the most expensive Pentagon program, The F-35 is, however, stealthy, which the F-15 isnt, Aboulafia said.

                          The decision to buy the newest version of the F-15 may not sit well with F-35 supporters within the Pentagon and in Congress because it would essentially compete for funding.

                          F-15C, -D, and -E models participated in Operation Desert Storm in 1991, according to information on Boeings website. The F-15 notched 32 of 36 U.S. Air Force air-to-air victories and struck Iraqi ground targets. F-15s served in Bosnia in 1994 and downed three Serbian MiG-29 fighters in Operation Allied Force in 1999. They enforced no-fly zones over Iraq in the 1990s. Eagles also hit Afghan targets in Operation Enduring Freedom, and the F-15E version performed air-to-ground missions in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

                          https://about.bgov.com/blog/pentagon...eing-fighters/
                          Last edited by bring_it_on; 22nd December 2018, 03:36.
                          Old radar types never die; they just phased array

                          Comment

                          • St. John
                            Rank 4 Registered User
                            • Jan 2018
                            • 568

                            When I read that I just think, "more F-22s already."

                            Comment

                            • bring_it_on
                              2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
                              • Jun 2004
                              • 12479

                              The USAF is committed to a SOS approach to Next Generation Air Dominance and has put some serious $$$ behind the effort in the budget over the FYDP. The next budget will probably provide more clarity but could also give a glimpse into what is beyond the FYDP in terms of overall plans. I don't think a production re-start of the F-22 is what they want.

                              The F-15X article points to a decision to recapitalize the USAF Air National Guard F-15C fleet by ordering new F-15X's which appear to be single seater versions of the Qatari F-15E's on order with EPAWSS replacing DEWS and Legion Pod replacing whatever combination they are planning. It remains to be seen, if this plan still stays in the budget, which radar they choose but since they are moving to ADCP II they should pick the APG-82 since the mission computers allow full use of that radar's performance and capabilities . I believe the earlier plan was to literally keep flying the existing F-15's through the 2030s and beyond. With extra cash they can now afford to recap some of this fleet and will likely save money on upgrades and lifetime O&S by having a younger fleet. I think this is a good move as long as the unit cost does not get too crazy and they can be assured sustained funding. Earlier this year, there was some talk and action to possibly re-looking at EPAWSS-C (EPAWSS for C variant F-15) which had been terminated last year which could suggest that they will upgrade some of the F-15C's while recapitalize others to ensure high availability and reasonable O&S cost though the Guard will be getting a slightly different variant compared to their F-15Cs.
                              Last edited by bring_it_on; 22nd December 2018, 21:00.
                              Old radar types never die; they just phased array

                              Comment

                              • TomcatViP
                                Rank 5 Registered User
                                • Nov 2011
                                • 5959

                                One thing for sure: as they do have to need the range/speed /payload bonus it is dubious that the next gen fighter will be subsonic!

                                Comment

                                • St. John
                                  Rank 4 Registered User
                                  • Jan 2018
                                  • 568

                                  Here's a picture anyway.


                                  Click image for larger version

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                                  Comment

                                  • bring_it_on
                                    2005-year of the RAPTOR!!
                                    • Jun 2004
                                    • 12479

                                    Next phase in a couple of months (early 2019), and full system demonstration in late 2019 to include recovery of 4 Air Vehicles in under 30 minutes. There's some good actual footage of the air-vehicle during early testing.

                                    Last edited by bring_it_on; 22nd December 2018, 19:34.
                                    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

                                    Comment

                                    • Marcellogo
                                      Rank 5 Registered User
                                      • Jun 2014
                                      • 1810


                                      It's sorta remind me something...

                                      Aaah, found it...


                                      Sorry, I JUST couldn't resist...

                                      Comment

                                      • St. John
                                        Rank 4 Registered User
                                        • Jan 2018
                                        • 568

                                        I was thinking....

                                        Click image for larger version

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                                        Comment

                                        • TomcatViP
                                          Rank 5 Registered User
                                          • Nov 2011
                                          • 5959

                                          Don't forget the F-15X will be a single seater.

                                          Comment

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