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  • BlackArcher
    Rank 5 Registered User

    So you saw an image and could figure that out, but the actual designers didn't think of that is it? They go through all the effort of creating those models and something that basic wouldn't be figured out? You really are underestimating their common sense.

    You are seeing it from one angle and have no idea how much clearance is available between the canards and the wing. As for the canopy, of course it should be a solution that allows for it to be opened.

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    • eagle
      Rank 5 Registered User

      I didn't say the designers didn't think of that. But rather that the actual design will not look like that.
      You don't place canards where the fuselage is concave shaped.
      How can less be more? It's impossible. More is more.
      Yngwie Malmsteen

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      • TomcatViP
        Rank 5 Registered User

        there is no room to move the canards (look at the picture above, the clearance is no more than one single feet). Add to that that the downward visibility completely obstructed and you might want as well to relocate the pilot upside down in the nose wheel landing gear bay

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        • BlackArcher
          Rank 5 Registered User







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          • BlackArcher
            Rank 5 Registered User

            Naval LCA NP-02 landing



            Image credit: Deb Rana

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            • BlackArcher
              Rank 5 Registered User

              Naval LCA - the LEVCON can be clearly seen. I would expect that the Tejas Mk2 will position the canard slightly higher than the region where the LEVCON is currently placed on the Naval LCA, to allow for greater angle of movement.

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              • BlackArcher
                Rank 5 Registered User



                LCA on a scramble..

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                • BlackArcher
                  Rank 5 Registered User

                  HAL to build 3rd Tejas assembly line at Nashik, where the current Su-30MKI assembly line exists. This should allow HAL to be able to build upto 20 or more Tejas fighters per year (16 in Bangalore and 5 in Nashik as per current plan).

                  And the Elta 2052 AESA order may be placed soon, since technical negotiations and commercial negotiations have been completed. The indigenous Uttam AESA radar still hasn't been flight tested, so its some ways to go before it will feature on production Tejas Mk1As.

                  HAL Chairman R Madhavan's interview


                  Hindustan AeronauticsNSE 3.13 % Limited (HAL) is not in the offsets business and is not contending for offsets in the Rafale deal, R Madhavan told ET in his first interview since taking charge as the chairman of the state-run aerospace and defence company in September. At a time when opposition parties are accusing the government of wrongfully denying HAL the offsets contract in the deal with France for fighter aircraft, Madhavan said HAL had told its employees not to get involved with any political party on the issue. He said HAL was augmenting its LCA (light combat aircraft) production line and gearing up to secure more orders.
                  ....


                  How would you respond to questions on capability of HAL to manufacture fighter jets?
                  HAL has been supporting the air force and even today 75% of the Air Forces flying equipment are made or maintained by us. In any of the technical areas, our capability cannot be under question. Capacity could be an issue, and we are in the process of augmenting our capacity through our vendors. HAL has partnered with four private sector companies Larsen and Toubro, VEM Technologies, Alpha Design and Dynamatics who will be making almost the entire structure of the LCA. We only want to do the final integration. HAL would like to focus on design, integration, flight testing and support.


                  How do you see HALs export prospects in the near future? The UAE recently evinced interest in the LCA programme
                  We have a certain number of target countries, mostly in Southeast Asia and some in West Asia and Africa. We now plan to take our products to these potential customers. We will take them for flight demonstrations and we have in-principle approval from the air force for this as well. Recently, the UAE defence minister also visited our facilities and showed keen
                  interest in not only the LCA but also the advanced light helicopter. We plan to now take this further.

                  What are HALs plans on augmenting the LCA line and integrating it with a new AESA radar?
                  We are increasing the capacity from producing eight aircraft a year to 16 a year. We are spending Rs 1,380 crore to increase production and can even take it to 20 aircraft per year by running extra shifts. A third line is also being planned at Nashik in case we get larger orders. In fact, we have already ordered the jigs and fixtures for Nashik. Even though we can make 16 aircraft a year, we cannot sell more than seven as the final operational clearances are still stuck. The aeronautical development agency is in talks with stakeholders to resolve that. On the AESA (active electronically scanned array) radar, the technical aspects and commercial negotiations with a foreign vendor are now complete. We are hoping to place the order very soon. Of course, whenever an indigenous radar is ready, we will be happy to integrate it.




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                  • TomcatViP
                    Rank 5 Registered User

                    Although I do see HAL as a formidable asset for India, the fact that HAL is the body that have to take decisions on imports of sub-components put them in a judge and accuser position. It could be more simple to have gov furnished items instead of what HAL is now mandated to purchase by its own. The Israeli AESA and GE engines are two example of that.

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                    • BlackArcher
                      Rank 5 Registered User

                      Tejas Mk1 of the No.45 Flying Daggers squadron operating out of its home base at AFS Sulur, Coimbatore.




                      Bengaluru: Resurrected in Bengaluru on July 1, 2016, at the Aircraft and Systems Testing Establishment (ASTE) of Indian Air Force (IAF) and then moved to Air Force Station Sulur, near Coimbatore on July 1, 2018, -- the No 45 Squadron, Flying Daggers -- now operating the Tejas has come a long way, ...
                      link to article




                       
                      Last edited by BlackArcher; 9th November 2018, 18:50.

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                      • Spitfire9
                        Rank 5 Registered User

                        From HAL Chairman R Madhavan's interview

                        HAL has partnered with four private sector companies Larsen and Toubro, VEM Technologies, Alpha Design and Dynamatics who will be making almost the entire structure of the LCA.
                        Is there any info on when these companies will have ramped up to production of 16 per annum? Until such a time it seems to me that Tejas assembly rate will fall short/far short of the current target.
                        Sum ergo cogito

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                        • BlackArcher
                          Rank 5 Registered User

                          Key updates on the Tejas production ramp up

                          link to article

                          Fighters upto SP-16 at the LCA Tejas Division


                          SP-12 and SP-14 at the LCA Tejas Division


                          SP-13 at the Aircraft Division


                          SP-15 at the Aircraft Division


                          -Series production fighters SP-12, SP-14 and SP-16 are currently being built at the LCA Tejas Division (which has a current capacity of 5 a/c per year, to be augmented to 8)
                          -Series production fighters SP-13 and SP-15 are currently being built at the Aircraft Division (which currently has a capacity of 3 a/c per year, to be augmented to 8)

                          - Series production fighter SP-12 fighter is ready to undergo a full performance EGR (engine ground run) signalling that it will be ready for its first flight in a week's time

                          - HAL officials say that SP-13 and SP-15 will be ready for maiden flights in December. The Aircraft Division will hand over these two fighters to the Tejas Division after conducting the HSTT (high-speed taxi trials).

                          - HAL is awaiting a major milestone when L&T Aerospace delivers the first set of wings for Tejas. This it says will be a major step in Make in India and its partnership with a private industry. The last fighter in the IOC series SP-16 will be the first to be integrated with the wings from L&T.

                          - HAL says that the first FOC fighter (SP-21) will fly out by October 2019. It is hopeful of creating a new benchmark by delivering 16 aircraft during 2019-20 fiscal.
                          -
                          HAL says that the assembly of two sets of air fame have already started for SP-21 and SP-22.
                          - The parts for SP-23 and SP-24 will be up by the first week of December 2018.
                          In addition to the 16 fighters to be built in Bangalore, HAL will also begin to assemble Tejas fighters at its Nashik division, where Su-30MKI fighters are currently assembled. The final number to be built will be based on the total orders for Tejas Mk1As.

                          - HAL says that Drawing Applicability Lists (DAL) or the final drawing lists for the 8 Tejas Trainers will be available in February 2019, after which the assembly of SP-17 to SP-20 (4 IOC Trainers) and SP-36 to SP-40 (4 FOC Trainers) will begin. They should be delivered starting from 30 months after DAL (~August 2021)
                          Last edited by BlackArcher; 12th November 2018, 18:41.

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                          • BlackArcher
                            Rank 5 Registered User

                            Tejas FOC is within striking distance, with final trials for Auto Low Speed Recovery (ALSR) and Disorientation Recovery Function (DRF) for full carefree maneuvering.

                            link


                            The next key task for Indias Light Combat Aircraft Tejas is to undertake auto low-speed recovery (ALSR) flights. This is part of the last leg of activities towards the Final Operational Clearance (FOC), likely to be accorded to the programme, this December.

                            ALSR is a state-of-the-art-feature that guarantees complete carefree manoeuvring of the aircraft. In a conventional dogfight situation the fighter jets need to perform extreme manoeuvres. To enable the pilot to concentrate on his combat task, the Tejas fly-by-wire system automatically limits the aircraft parameters to ensure no departure from controlled flight and also ensures that none of the structural limits of the aircraft are exceeded. Unlike in a conventional fighter aircraft (MiG 21, MiG 27 or Jaguar), where the pilot has to continuously monitor all the parameters while doing combat, Tejas with this feature completely carefree. Engineers and designers from Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA), Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) and the test crew from National Flight Test Centre are all geared up for this impending test. The Initial Operational Clearance (IOC) version of the Tejas (16 fighters) already automatically limits many of the aircraft parameters. The only parameter not being limited automatically is low speed which the pilot needs to monitor in flight. But for the FOC versions, even the speed limiting is made automatic, making the aircraft carefree.

                            In this mode, the flight control system (FCS) continuously monitors the pilot's manoeuvres and once it detects that the current manoeuvre if continued for some more seconds could lead to a low-speed departure, it gives a warning to the pilot to take corrective action. However, in case the pilot ignores this warning the auto-low speed recover function takes over control of the aircraft and recovers it to a safe condition in the shortest possible time.

                            If pilots get disoriented

                            Another related feature in the FOC version of the control laws which is also being tested simultaneously is the Disorientation Recovery Function (DRF). Pilots may get disoriented at times while flying into clouds or while flying over the sea. In such situations, a switch (panic button) is provided in the cockpit. If pressed by the pilot, the FCS takes over the controls and recovers the aircraft to level flight optimally (with minimum loss of speed or altitude).

                            Here again IIT Bombay is said to have done some cutting edge work in creating the optimal algorithms. Thus while the auto low speed recovery mode cuts in automatically, the DRF mode is engaged by the pilot when he needs it. The trials for ALSR and disorientation recovery will be done in various air-defence and ground attack configurations.


                            As reported by Onmanorama earlier, Tejas had made its first ever air-to-air wet contact with an Indian Air Force (IAF) tanker over Gwalior in September this year. A Tejas variant (LSP-8) made the wet contact with an IAF IL-78 tanker for the planned air-to-air refuelling. About 1,900 kg of fuel was transferred during the in-flight refuelling process at an altitude of 20,000 feet.

                            The scientists now say that during the subsequent air-to-air refuelling trials, up to 2,700 kg of fuel was transferred with the maximum fuel carrying load of Tejas being 4,000 kg.
                            Air-to-air refuelling is one of the most difficult exercises for a pilot and is a high-gain piloting task. The FCS came out with flying colours during this tight tracking task and remarkably the pilot could achieve contact with the refuelling drogue in the first attempt. The skills of Tejas were also tested during Gagan Shakti (military exercise) and it changed the way IAF perceives the programme, an official said. The Tejas MK-I is capable of pulling up to a maximum of 8 G at 24 degrees Angle of Attack (AoA). The control laws (CLAW) are the defining factors that will help pilots manoeuvre safely during these situations.

                            Weapon trials on Currently the Tejas team is embarking on final FOC weapon trials at Jaisalmer. Tejas has performed very creditably in the Flying Daggers Squadron during their weapon trials. The accuracies of the weapon drops have been very good. While the air-to-ground bombs for FOC have been already deployed successfully, there is a need to have a statistical measure of the accuracy of each weapon, which is called as the Circular Error of Probability (CEP). With the CEP, the Flying Flying Daggers can then plan the number of aircraft and their configurations to ensure success in destroying an enemy asset. During the ongoing weapons trials at Jaisalmer, hundreds of bombs of different types are being dropped from Tejas to establish the CEPs. With the FOC now at a striking distance the Tejas programme has been surely heading with a clear flightpath in sight. The software fine-tuning will continue even as the FOC fighters start rolling out from HAL hangars. These fighters will be fitted with the fuel probe, GSh-24 gun and a SDR (software-defined radio) among others as mandated by the IAF.

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