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The AESA radar retrofit market

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  • swerve
    replied
    The Brazilian P-95 (EMB-110 maritime surveillance variant) is being re-fitted with the Selex Seaspray 5000E. Another AESA retrofit.

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  • bring_it_on
    replied
    You'll see those on Unmanned vehicles. The JSTARS-Recap effort is a simple project that utilizes only the most mature technology (AESA radars developed under the MRTIP for example) and packs it into a system that is affordable and that is paid for by savings from JSTARS early retirement. Nothing fancy is being sought here.

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  • bring_it_on
    replied
    Originally posted by MadRat View Post
    The mini-JSTARS is cute and all, but it looks too cramped. I'd much rather have a stubby short body than a long cylinder. Too little leg room. I want 3-dimensional holograms displaying battle space. Glow in the dark marker writing on see-through dry erase boards. The epitome of the Star Wars rebel attack command station. Perhaps this is more plausible with a Flying Wing? Anyone?

    What is more important to me is the size of the radar. NG is pitching a radar on the G550 that is just 15% smaller than on the JSTARS, so if they can get adequate power the performance of the sensor would most likely match or exceed given the difference in tech between then and now. Like they have said in media, they have offered solutions based on the smallest possible business jet as well as Boeing and Airbus aircraft. The main objective of the Recap effort is to pay for the new builds with the money saved from operating the fleet of JSTARS which tells me that for now at least the USAF is not going to go in for a big platform. If its open architecture and scalable they could migrate at any time in the future if need be but i seriously doubt that they would.

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  • djcross
    replied
    All the relevant data would be compressed and piped down to the Joint Operations Center. The old days of a fuselage full of specialists sitting at consoles is long over.

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  • MadRat
    replied
    The mini-JSTARS is cute and all, but it looks too cramped. I'd much rather have a stubby short body than a long cylinder. Too little leg room. I want 3-dimensional holograms displaying battle space. Glow in the dark marker writing on see-through dry erase boards. The epitome of the Star Wars rebel attack command station. Perhaps this is more plausible with a Flying Wing? Anyone?

    Last edited by MadRat; 4th February 2015, 07:50.

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  • bring_it_on
    replied
    Both Northrop and Boeing could potentially be winners since Boeing, has not committed itself to a radar supplier and are open to integrate any sensor the air-force sees fit onto the 737-700. Anyhow this is the Northrop G550.



    Below is a concept :

    Last edited by bring_it_on; 4th February 2015, 05:42.

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  • bring_it_on
    replied
    Northrop Grumman have demonstrated a G550 based JSTARS replacement to the Air Combat Command.


    Metzger said Northrop Grumman has done trade studies on “over 120 different types of airplanes and racked and stacked them all. I would say there are three or four that are leading candidates, whether you want a business jet or business liner-type aircraft, and so any number of business jets will work.” The company looked at 737s and Airbus products, and there are “pros and cons” associated with them all, Metzger said. The final choice for what Northrop Grumman may offer will be driven by USAF’s requirements, he said.





    Metzger noted that Northrop Grumman has outfitted a Gulfstream 550 aircraft with a radar and workstations, proving out various concepts it could offer when the Air Force nails down its requirements. It has taken the jet to Air Combat Command headquarters at JB Langley-Eustis, Va.; to Hanscom AFB, Mass., home of Electronics Systems Center; to JB Andrews, Md., for members of USAF HQ and other Pentagon officials to look at; and to Robins AFB, Ga., where the current JSTARS is flown.


    The demonstrator showed off “the aircraft itself, the outer mold lines, the things we have done [with] advanced BMC2 consoles, capabilities, and most importantly, the mission software, which I would characterize as an 85-90 percent solution.” The G550 is also an airplane in USAF’s inventory, as the basis of the C-37 executive transport.
    http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineA...ARS-Recap.aspx

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  • SajeevJino
    replied
    .

    The Israeli's comes first

    The Israeli air force is upgrading the capabilities of its Boeing F-15I strike aircraft, including the installation of a new radar system.

    The sensor most likely to be fitted is the Raytheon APG-82(V)1 active electronically scanned array, which was also fitted to the US Air Force's F-15Es in place of the ageing APG-70.
    Flight Global

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  • bring_it_on
    replied
    For all Economic, budget related, or population age related discussion please create an appropriate thread here.



    http://forum.keypublishing.com/forum...ral-Discussion

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  • Rii
    replied
    Originally posted by Levsha View Post
    The populations of most developed nations are aging rapidly, in fact, I thought the USA had a younger aged population than most other industrialised countries?
    This is true, but does not make it any easier for the US to sustain or increase defence spending going forward -- it just means other nations will confront the same problem.

    The latest Long-Term Budget Outlook from the Congressional Budget Office makes the naive assumption that currently mandated spending constraints will remain in place until 2024, by which time defense spending will have declined to 2.7% of GDP -- lower than at any point during the Clinton administration, and a figure which is sure to give the Pentagon (which has been pushing 4% as an "absolute minimum") a heart-attack. The fact that one has to get to page 53 before the CBO gets around to addressing DoD says something of itself, I think. Fortunately, present observation, history and theory all agree that DoD has little reason to be concerned that present budgetary constraints will actually be maintained, and it is entirely possible that the Pentagon will enjoy robust funding growth over the next decade and beyond -- at corresponding cost to the long-term fiscal outlook, of course.
    Last edited by Rii; 21st January 2015, 22:29.

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  • Levsha
    replied
    Originally posted by Rii View Post
    I wouldn't bet on it. An ageing population (proportion of US population >70yrs of age jumps 50% from 2015-2030) will place significant upward pressure on two of the largest components of domestic expenditure: healthcare and social security.
    The populations of most developed nations are aging rapidly, in fact, I thought the USA had a younger aged population than most other industrialised countries? Americans are certainly younger in age compared to Japanese and Germans.

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  • bring_it_on
    replied
    Israel to upgrade F-15Is with new radar


    The Israeli air force is upgrading the capabilities of its Boeing F-15I strike aircraft, including the installation of a new radar system.

    The sensor most likely to be fitted is the Raytheon APG-82(V)1 active electronically scanned array, which was also fitted to the US Air Force's F-15Es in place of the ageing APG-70.

    The selection of the US-made radar instead of an Israeli-designed option is likely the result of the fact that Israel can purchase the APG-82(V)1 using the Foreign Military Funding it receives annually from the USA.

    "The F-15I is still our strategic jet. It holds the largest number of capabilities and has the ability to carry many weapons and reach far destinations," the head of the F-15I branch told the air force's website. Tasks range from "routine missions related to the combat formation to special missions which will remain confidential", says the official – identified only as Maj A.Israel's comprehensive systems upgrade for the F-15I is a direct outcome of a delay in the delivery of the Lockheed Martin F-35.

    The nation has ordered 19 conventional take-off and landing F-35As at a cost of $2.75 billion, with the first two due to arrive in Israel in 2018. Late last year, the defence ministry also received approval to acquire another 14 of the stealthy type.

    http://www.flightglobal.com/news/art...-radar-408113/

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita.../an-apg-82.htm

    On the topic of F-35 Procurement, I seriously doubt that the USAF would significantly move away from its F-35A planed acquisition strategy for the next decade. The numbers are given in the SAR.
    Last edited by bring_it_on; 21st January 2015, 15:13.

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  • Rii
    replied
    Originally posted by haavarla View Post
    oh and i meant this decade, not the next. The US Defence funding might improve a little bit in the next decade though, or at least at the end of it.
    I wouldn't bet on it. An ageing population (proportion of US population >70yrs of age jumps 50% from 2015-2030) will place significant upward pressure on two of the largest components of domestic expenditure: healthcare and social security.
    Last edited by Rii; 21st January 2015, 13:24.

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  • swerve
    replied
    Since Typhoon is getting an AESA radar, I don't think the answer to that question matters much now. I think that the F-15 may have got its last new-build order, though: the countries that might have bought more F-15s have either already done so, or are going to get F-35. Saudi Arabia is getting new F-15Es, & also upgrading its current fleet to the same standard, including AESA radars. I think Saudi F-15C/Ds are not being upgraded.

    What'll be interesting is how many Typhoons get the AESA.

    In terms of number of retrofits, the F-16 market looks to be the biggest.

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  • a89
    replied
    How would an upgraded AESA F-15 compare with a current EF-2000 (mechanical radar)? The American fighter has obtained a few contracts in recent years, beating more modern airframes. I think it's combination of range, performance, avionics and weapons is still hard to beat.

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  • djcross
    replied
    My bet would be that USMC and USN orders will be filled, but USAF quantities will be cut in half.

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  • bring_it_on
    replied
    2500 odd is the overall purchase by the Pentagon, and involves the F-35C for the Navy and the USMC, as well as the F-35B for the USMC. The USAF (F-35A) plans on ordering 618 F-35's in the 10 year period between 2015 and 2024. This would be on top of the jets the receive prior to 2015.
    Last edited by bring_it_on; 20th January 2015, 19:25.

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  • haavarla
    replied
    Originally posted by bring_it_on View Post
    No, they expect to receive around 1700.
    Yeah, i've seen est figures in the 1600-1700 range, but there is also the 2000+2500 swimming around on different forums.
    F-16.net is like up way up there..

    oh and i meant this decade, not the next. The US Defence funding might improve a little bit in the next decade though, or at least at the end of it.

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  • bring_it_on
    replied
    With the glooming prospect of US defence funding for the next decade, does the USAF really expect to recieve 2000 F-35?
    No, they expect to receive around 1700.

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  • haavarla
    replied
    With the glooming prospect of US defence funding for the next decade, does the USAF really expect to recieve 2000 F-35?
    It sound highly optimistic at this point.

    Leave a comment:

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