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De havilland Queen Bee

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  • Proctor VH-AHY
    Rank 5 Registered User

    De havilland Queen Bee

    G'day all

    As an owner/pilot of a Tiger Moth, I am familar with the Queen Bee, how I have no idea how these were used. Were they a target, or did they tow a target drone.

    I am sure that many would be interested to know just what were the techniques used in operating these aeroplanes.

    cheers
  • cometguymk1
    Rank 5 Registered User

    #2
    I dont know if they were aimed at or had a target drone, but i have some info on the control systems if that would be of interest.

    Will
    My Attempt at photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/willsplanes/

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    • low'n'slow
      Rank 5 Registered User

      #3
      They were, what would be called today "an expendable target drone".

      Radio controlled, they were launched by catapult, then radio controlled using pulse signals from (honest) an old-style telephone dial.

      Dialing nine or ......... gave you a dive.
      Six or ...... gave you climb
      Five or ..... left turn
      Three or ... right turn

      At the end of a flight, if the aeroplane was still intact, it either was ditched and recovered, landed on floats, or on rare occaisions, landed back, at which point when a long antenna touched the surface, the mags were cut off and up elevator selected.

      Three survive. One under restoration in the USA. The Salisbury Hall static exhibit (front cockpit showing test dial etc shown below) and the sole flying example which lives at RAF Henlow, owned by the 'Beekeepers' syndicate.

      If you need to know more - I can recommend a very good Haynes Tiger Moth Manual !!!
      Last edited by low'n'slow; 6th January 2010, 12:21.
      www.lightaircraftassociation.co.uk

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      • No.2 A.A.C.U.
        Rank 5 Registered User

        #4
        low n slow is quite correct although, I believe, they were also used in an 'off-shoot' sortie where naturally the aircraft was not designed to be lost. As stated the landings could be somewhat perilous as this photo of a No.1 A.A.C.U. 'V' Flight Queen Bee P-4700 shows. Note the long anatenna has wrapped around the tail. Photo taken at RAF Cleave approx 1940 although this machine survived until 1943 when lost off Manorbier 05.03.1943 whilst with the P.R.U.


        Kind regards,

        Tim
        Attached Files

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        • keithnewsome
          Rank 5 Registered User

          #5
          Couple of photos of the flying example, both from 2009, Little Gransden and North Weald .... Keith.



          NOSTALGIA ..... It's not what it used to be .....

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          • Proctor VH-AHY
            Rank 5 Registered User

            #6
            I wonder how a Queen Bee would go as a scratch built "Tiger" from memory they are essentially a Tiger Moth with a wooden fuselage.

            In Australia, the most difficult bit to get for a Tiger project is the fuselage.

            What to others think, is there plans around for the fuselage? I know a guy that has just purchased a semi-trailer (I kid you not) of tiger spares and I think I might be able to talk him around to building one if the fuselage plans were available.

            cheers
            Last edited by Proctor VH-AHY; 29th October 2009, 23:20.

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            • Fournier Boy
              Rank 5 Registered User

              #7
              If he has any tailskid castings (the bushed part which the spring attaches to - not the actual pad) I'm in the market!

              FB
              Last edited by Fournier Boy; 30th October 2009, 00:28. Reason: really bad spelling - must try harder

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              • Proctor VH-AHY
                Rank 5 Registered User

                #8
                Fournier Boy

                Can't check at the moment, he is out of the country, I will try and find out. Is this the bit that the tail skid bolts onto. It is a bit of pipe bushed hinge on one end and as you sai the spring attaches to it. From memory this is a welded part and not a casting on Australian Tigers, not sure about pommie ones.

                cheers

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                • Fournier Boy
                  Rank 5 Registered User

                  #9
                  I'll get a piccie to you - mine has worn both in the bushing and in the block - a new bush might take some of the play out for a moment but ultimately it all needs replacing.

                  Will PM you back with details

                  Rgds

                  FB

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                  • helicopterdcr
                    Rank 5 Registered User

                    #10
                    FB - doesn't the dHMC not have one in their Stockbox?

                    If you are still stuck, PM me - I might be able to put you in touch with the required part - a picture would help me too.

                    Cheers,
                    Dave

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