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Variable incidence tailpane on Canberra

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    #21
    Thing that I remember about the Canberra is that crews returning from Luqua were rumoured (it could not possible be true, now could it?) to stow duty free fags in the tailplane actuator space and the customs officers couldn't check the area as 'on the secret list'.
    Mike (RAF Marham 1956-8)

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      #22
      One pilot if I remember correctly came back from Hong Kong and reported that he had handling problems and noticed the Nav getting the groundcrew to unpanel the back end, there he discovered a new washing machine tied off to the cables. He had spent the whole trip humping a washing machine back and forth.

      As for moving tail planes check out the Mooney's, the whole backend pivots just fwd of the fin.

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        #23
        getting the groundcrew to unpanel the back end
        Unlikely, access to the rear fuselage is via a panel on the underside and ust big enough for one person to enter.

        As for the tailplane actuator space ... I don’t think so.

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          #24
          Originally posted by TonyT
          As for moving tail planes check out the Mooney's, the whole backend pivots just fwd of the fin.
          Or PA22 Piper Colt or Piper Tripacer

          Moggy
          "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

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            #25
            Originally posted by TonyT
            One pilot if I remember correctly came back from Hong Kong and reported that he had handling problems and noticed the Nav getting the groundcrew to unpanel the back end, there he discovered a new washing machine tied off to the cables. He had spent the whole trip humping a washing machine back and forth.
            I agree with Exbrat on this one Tony - I think it is unlikely that anybody could smuggle a whole washing machine into blighty via a Canberra,I doubt you could even fit a small one such as a Hoover Washdog (twin tub) up through the back hatch of a Canberra - as Exbrat posted - the back hatch panel was just big enough to mount your (3 ?) spare starter cartridges on and just big enough to get the rear (flexible) fuel tank in and out of.I did see a PR7 in from Malta one day in the early 70's and the pilot proceeded to untie his bicycle from inside the fuselage (camera bay ? ) - he had been posted back to blighty.

            rgds baz

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              #26
              Originally posted by nazca_steve

              What do the 'min' denote by the way? Not being that technically minded it went over my head.
              'min' = minutes

              60 minutes in one degree.In aviation terms it is the usual calibration unit used for Rigging on flying controls using (say) a Watts Clinometer to accurately measure flying control range of movement or for checking angles of incidence etc.
              Sorry about late reply LOL

              rgds baz

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                #27
                A friend of my father was flying a Canberra in 1954 or 55 at the Biggin Hill airshow (I believe) when he suffered a tailplane actuator fault.
                Apparently, during a flypast, the aircraft climbed and disappeared from view...shortening his routine somewhat.
                He did manage to land the aircraft, with great difficulty. I believe, as a result, Canberras were grounded whilst the fault was investigated.
                Richard,

                there were a number of Canberra tailplane incidents and accidents going back a number of years. Unfortunately there was little hard evidence as to the cause(s), and a bit of "burying head in sand" by the authorities. Finally came to a head in March 1956, by which time the the growing number of reported malfunctions (and fatal crashes in which tailplane was implicated) could not be ignored. So the incident you mention was really just one several. Several fixes were proposed (since the root cause was not 100% understood) before a series of modifications were developed and applied.

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                  #28
                  Hi Abadonna,
                  Thank you for your reply, I thought it was a bit of a long shot...but worth asking.

                  The same pilot was involved in an incident at RAF Bassingbourn or Binbrook in 1953/54 where he had a brake failure on landing.
                  The Canberra came off the end of the runway but thankfully the crew were unharmed...
                  However, when the fire engine reached them it couldn't stop and it ran down a slope and into the tailplane, this caused the pilot some head injuries as he was just climbing out of the aircraft.
                  I'm guessing there conversation that followed couldn't be written on this forum!

                  Anyway, thanks again
                  Richard

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                    #29
                    Richard,

                    the overrun accident could have been WD998 (9 Sqn) on 10 August 1953. Landed at high speed, no flap and high weight. Despite heavy braking ran off end off end of runway, across overshoot and beetfield and came to rest on bank. Pilot Officer T G Murphy. Cat 3R. Pilot error.

                    Just found the other incident. WD946. 9 Sqn. 20 September 1954. Battle of Britain display. "At Church Fenton, Flg Off T G Murphy was unable to do a high-speed run due to his tail trimmer sticking in the nose down position". No fault found in subsequent examination of aircraft.
                    Last edited by abadonna; 12th January 2018, 18:03. Reason: additional information

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                      #30
                      Hi abadonna,
                      That is brilliant stuff, thank you. Your searching through the records is very much appreciated.
                      (I'm very impressive after I gave details of the wrong squadron and airshow!)
                      I'll pass the information onto my dad, he will be very pleased to hear about it.
                      Pilot Officer T G Murphy was a childhood friend of my father and was best man at my parent's wedding.
                      Unfortunately, my dad lost touch with him when he transferred to a Vulcan squadron during the height of the Cold War.
                      I have made various attempts to find out how his career progressed without success.

                      Thanks again
                      Richard

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                        #31
                        Not sure if the same T G Murphy but there was a T G Murphy retired from the RAF as a Flt Lt in 1976
                        (SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 12TH OCTOBER 1976 page 13769) refers

                        1st Oct. 1976
                        T. G. MURPHY (3132187).

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                          #32
                          Hi Bazv
                          Thank you, that certainly looks like the correct T G Murphy, and it is nice to know that he managed to retire from the RAF.
                          The information is very useful as I now know his middle name and Service Number.

                          The last information we have is that he was flying VC10s out of Brize Norton.
                          (I'll continue my searches elsewhere, as I suspect I'm in the wrong forum for looking up former RAF personnel)
                          Thanks again
                          Richard

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                            #33
                            Pleasure Richard,hope it is the correct chap.

                            rgds baz

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