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Miles Messenger memories

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  • Planemike
    Rank 5 Registered User

    Mike...........

    Have checked the David Whitworth collection, do not appear to be there.

    However the Jackson Collection appears to have a negative of each aircraft.
    http://www.ajjcollection.co.uk

    Planemike

    PS ABPIC to the rescue for G-ALCS http://www.abpic.co.uk/results.php?q...atest&limit=10
    Last edited by Planemike; 16th April 2011, 15:00.

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    • MikeHoulder
      Rank 5 Registered User

      Many thanks

      Many thanks, Planemike.
      I've got those two now.
      Mike

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      • barnstormer
        Rank 5 Registered User

        Found this one in my prints. Haven't checked the negative collection, yet.
        Attached Files
        Joe G.

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        • Foxtrot Hotel
          Registered User

          Miles Messenger 4a. G-ALAI.



          Having googled a search on another matter I was interested to see this thread/topic which despite being stale I feel I can add some further information having had a part share in her in the late sixties.

          She was then operated by The Fourways Flying Group at Middleton St.George, now Durham TeesValley, and based in Number 1 Hangar where she is seen posed in one of the photos. Same photo in Ian Allen's Civil Aircraft Markings of 1969. I don't recall the red fin flashes but memory dims. In the same Hangar was Messenger 2a G-AJWB owned by Les Povey in the colours shown in the photo on page 4. We were always given to understand that AI was one of the Monty aircraft and certainly the interior was lavishly finished in Burgundy upholstery complete with plaited tassle hand holds. I recall on one visit to Deauville the local Aero Club members were very impressed and after several interior inspections she was given several accolades such as La plus Grande Vitesse limousine de l'air.

          My style of flying differed from my fellow group members in that I felt planes were for touring and we did many many trips in her but getting 'consent' to leave the area conflicted with the other members whose ideas went not much further that a Sunday jolly round the lighthouse.

          Our C of A was annual and took some time to complete so that we often joked that by the time we got her back from one inspection it was almost time for the next. Inspections were done at Sywell by Brooklands Aviation so Alpha India was a common sight down there as well. We reckon she knew the way there so well we could just let her find her own way til we saw the Reservoir.

          As C of A inspections covered all equipment we soon learned to strip out the Radio, ADF and other 'non essentials' so that Brooklands only got the bare airframe to work on. When safely back home it was quite easy to re-instal what we had removed and that way we kept the bills down.



          A few fond memories if anyone is interested.

          On one trip to France I stopped off at Biggn Hill for an overnight and was in the bar of Surrey and Kent Flying Club when a chap came in with a lump of metal in his hand. Yours I believe he said. It was an exhaust stub off the Gypsy Major. Just as well it came off when it did.


          On another we had been stuck at Berke sur Mere for two days due to autumnal Brume but one morning it seemed to have cleared enough to make the channel crossing via the Light Aircraft Corridor. And so it proved until having cleared the coast at Cap Gris Nez on a heading for Folkstone the sky and the flat sea merged and there was no ground reference to fly by. In danger of spatial disorientation I hastily trimmed her straight and level as we overflew the Varne Light vessel and was very pleased when a thin white line ahead gradually emerged as the chalk cliffs. I think we strayed off track quite a bit by keeping them in sight.


          Once we landed at Castle Donington for Sunday lunch with friends and on departigI remember that whilst on the long taxiway to the holding point we were followed by a BAC 111. With a stiff crosswind pulling at our three fins we were taking it very carefully and the Captain of the One eleven was not happy and radioed for us to hurry along. I agreed, but he got uptight and wanted us to speed up as he was burning fuel for which as Captain he was 'responsible!' I just radioed back that as Captain I was not only responsible for the safety of my aircraft but also responsible for actually paying for the fuel I was using. Tower was heard to chuckle.
          There are many more happy stories to tell one day but that is enough for now. I may have hung up my well used Dalton Navigational Computer Mk IIIf but it is still in my flight bag. Probably an antique now in this age of Apps and GPS



          After a happy time with ALAI we sadly decided to part with her in 1970 and she was sold to a Butcher from Mirfield, W.Yorks. I was very sorry to learn that on his first foreign trip he had run out of fuel and had forced landed in Northern France and damaged our gallant old lady and friend of many years beyond repair.



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          • kartman
            Rank 5 Registered User

            Glad to hear another Messenger is receiving some TLC, any chance you have a picture of the parts from G-AJFF, i used to pass it several times a week in a Garage forecourt near Elstree Aerodrome.............Martin
            pb::

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            • kartman
              Rank 5 Registered User

              Great stuff, many thanks........................M
              pb::

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