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Remembering the Greats: Blohm + Voss BV 222 Wiking (Viking)

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  • Ja Worsley
    The last sane man a live!
    • Jan 2000
    • 6550

    Remembering the Greats: Blohm + Voss BV 222 Wiking (Viking)

    The Blohm + Voss BV 222 Wiking (Viking) was a large German flying boat of World War II.

    The BV 222 Wiking six-engined flying boat was originally ordered in September 1937 by Deutsche Lufthansa as a civil flying boat, but was quickly taken over as a military transport. A dorsal gun turret was added behind the cockpit. Rearward facing machine gun turrets were added on both wings. Access in flight through the wing was via a tubular wing spar of a metre in diameter. Engineers could also reach the two stroke diesel engines in flight via the same spar.

    Originally the type was powered by Bramo 323 "Fafnir" radial engines. Later aircraft were powered by six 1,000 hp Jumo 207C inline diesel engines. The use of diesel engines permitted refueling at sea by U-boats. The BV 222C-13 aircraft was a sole example fitted with Jumo 205C engines and later Jumo 205D

    The type was noted for a long flat floor inside the cabin and a large square cargo door aft of the wing on the starboard side. The flat floor was a welcome novelty for that era. Only thirteen aircraft were thought to have been completed. Early aircraft were identified as V1 to V8. Production examples were designated C-09 to C-13.

    In Service

    There still remains doubt about the fate of aircraft C-11 and C-13 said to have been flown to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, USA for testing. There is no corroboration and any further information is welcomed from readers who can clarify their fate.

    BV222.jpg Several aircraft early in the war were used to supply forces in North Africa, operating mainly to Tripoli. Other aircraft of 1.(Fern/See) Aufklaerungsgruppe 129 flew from a base at the salt water lagoon of Biscarrose in the bay of Biscay. BV 222 V3 and V5 aircraft were destroyed at their moorings there in June 1943 following an attack by RAF De Havilland Mosquitos.

    The V8 and V6 aircraft were shot down in separate incidents over the Mediterranean. The V1 aircraft was destroyed in a landing accident at Piraeus harbour. The C-10 aircraft was shot down by RAF nightfighters in late 1943.

    Following the Normandy invasion remaining BV 222 aircraft were formed into a unit controlled by the ultra secret KG 200. Of these, C-09 was destroyed at her moorings in the Baltic port of Travemnde by P-51 Mustang fighters. Late in the war her sisters V7 and V4 were scuttled at Travemnde and Kiel-Holtenau, respectively.

    The V2 and C-12 aircraft were captured at Soreisa in Norway after the war and flown to Trondheim. This pair of aircraft had been readied at the instructions of Hitler's pilot Hans Bauer in 1945 to fly the Fuhrer to Japan via Greenland. These aircraft were prepared before Hitler's death, but interestingly the operation was still intended to proceed even after this according to orders dated May 1. A copy of this order to Oberstleutnant Lenschow, Kdr K-Stelle, Travemuende Fliegerhorst, still exists in archive form. The navigator of one aircraft involved was Hauptmann Ernst Koneig and he has come forward to corroborate details at the age of 93. Two of the aircraft which had been prepared for this mission were destroyed at their moorings in Germany (C-09 ?)

    The C-12 aircraft was flown by Captain Eric Brown to the RAF station at Calshot in 1946 with RAF markings "VP501". It was eventually scrapped in 1947. The V2 aircraft briefly wore US markings in 1946. Strangely the V2 aircraft had identification markings given to her from the original V5 aircraft for Operation Schatzgraber. V2 was later scuttled by the British who filled it with BV 222 spare parts from the base at Ilsvika to weigh her down. V2 was towed to a position between Fagervika and Monk's island where it is thought she now rests perfectly preserved on the seabed, owing to low oxygen levels in the water. There are plans to raise and restore this aircraft.

    There were claims after the war in a German newspaper that at least one BV 222 flew via the pole to Sakhalin Island, then part of Japanese territory prior to April 1944 whilst wearing Deutsche Lufthansa markings.

    At least one aircraft, V4, is said to have shot down a US Navy PB4Y Liberator of VB-105 (BU#63917) commanded by Lt Evert. This epic air battle occurred October 22, 1943. Since the war this has often been quoted as a BV 222 shooting down an Avro Lancaster.

    Specifications

    General Characteristics
    • * Crew: 16
      * Capacity: 92 troops
      * Length: 121 ft 4.75 in (37 m)
      * Wingspan: 150 ft 11 in (46 m)
      * Height: 35 ft 9 in (10.90 m)
      * Wing area: 2,744.89 ft (255 m) BV138.jpg
      * Empty: 67,572 lb (30650 kg)
      * Maximum fuel: 40,418 lb ( kg)
      * Maximum takeoff: 108,027 lb (49000 kg)
      * Powerplant: 6x Jumo 207C inline diesel engines, 1,000 hp ( kW) each


    [b/]Performance[/b]
    • * Maximum speed: 242 mph (390 km/h)
      * Cruising speed: 139 kts (257 km/h)
      * Endurance: 28 hours
      * Range: 3,787 miles (6095 km)
      * Service ceiling: 23,950 ft (7300 m)
      * Rate of climb: 492.13 ft/min (2.50 m/s)
      * Wing loading: lb/ft ( kg/m)
      * Power/Mass: hp/lb ( kW/kg)


    Armament
    • * Machine Canons: 3x20mm
      * Machine Guns: 4x13mm













    It's a good thing you are short, that way you don't have to live up to a high IQ!
  • Ja Worsley
    The last sane man a live!
    • Jan 2000
    • 6550

    #2
    Did any of these planes servive?
    It's a good thing you are short, that way you don't have to live up to a high IQ!

    Comment

    • dhfan
      Still cantankerous
      • Jan 2000
      • 2797

      #3
      A snippet from one of Eric Brown's books regarding his flight in a Wiking.

      He had flying boat experience, but IIRC only in a Walrus. He acquired a Luftwaffe POW pilot to help and show him the taps. After 2 miles flat out and still waterborne he discovered the pilot was trying to wreck the aircraft and had left the control locks in.

      Comment

      • DaveM2
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Jan 2000
        • 751

        #4
        Originally posted by Ja Worsley
        Did any of these planes servive?

        No. One sunk off the Norwegian coast post war and one shot up on Lk. Schaal Germany, but don't know if either are worth salvaging.

        Dave
        Last edited by DaveM2; 20th December 2005, 11:13.

        Comment

        • TEXANTOMCAT
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Mar 2004
          • 4538

          #5
          Havent Revell just done a kit of this beastie?

          TT
          Our Beech 18 & T-6@www.beechrestorations.com
          Visit Sywell Aviation Museum @
          www.sywellaerodrome.co.uk/museum.php
          Sywell Airshow 17.8.2014

          Comment

          • JgerMarty
            Plastic Pilot
            • Mar 2005
            • 559

            #6
            Yep, it's a monster of a plane, even in 72nd scale, let alone 1:1

            Comment

            • Charley
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Oct 2004
              • 238

              #7
              At least one aircraft, V4, is said to have shot down a US Navy PB4Y Liberator of VB-105 (BU#63917) commanded by Lt Evert. This epic air battle occurred October 22, 1943. Since the war this has often been quoted as a BV 222 shooting down an Avro Lancaster.

              That must have been an awesome airbattle. Incredible.

              Comment

              • Ja Worsley
                The last sane man a live!
                • Jan 2000
                • 6550

                #8
                Thanks for the input guys.

                DHFan: that wasn't very nice of him, guess it proves that this was a plane worth keeping secret even after the war was over.

                DaveM2: Any ideas if there is an exact location on either of these? I have a "Commando Comic" (I'm a collector) that mentions an attack by SBS forces in Norway on a Wiking base, perhaps this is where the story came from? Another Comic mentions one flying to Canada on a secret mission to capture Sonar Boffins, interesting if true.

                Tex and Jager: whilest searching for these pics I came across the Revel model, yes it is huge and if i ever find one I will not hesitate in buying it, but this was small compared to the next plane that B+V were to produce, I'll dig up the site again and show those pics. Personally I find all flying boats facinating aircraft and my favourite is without a doubt the B+V 138.

                Charley: I have hear about the Liberator battle IIRC the entire crew received the Knights Cross 2nd Class for their actions and became the only flying boat crew in the entire war to gain the highest military honour their country could bestow upon them.
                It's a good thing you are short, that way you don't have to live up to a high IQ!

                Comment

                • Steve Bond
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Jan 2000
                  • 1786

                  #9
                  My friend Heinz Roekker, the Luftwaffe night fighter ace, has told me that he was evacuated from North Africa in a BV.222, which he recalls as being "big."

                  Comment

                  • Pete Truman
                    Senior Member
                    • Nov 2004
                    • 2316

                    #10
                    It's quite interesting to see that this beast was driven by diesel engines, not a subject that I know much about, however, having 'Googled', the results are quite interesting.
                    How far advanced are the plans to raise the a/c from the water and who is prepared to conserve such a large airframe.

                    Comment

                    • Ja Worsley
                      The last sane man a live!
                      • Jan 2000
                      • 6550

                      #11
                      Pete: Mate no plans are around that I know of to raise any aircraft, as mentioned above, it's doubtfull that any are in a good condition to be resurected.

                      As for the Diesel engines, you'd probably have come acorss the same reasons I have for having such engines: That is to enable them to be refueled from U boats.
                      It's a good thing you are short, that way you don't have to live up to a high IQ!

                      Comment

                      • Jan
                        Jan
                        Rank 5 Registered User
                        • Jul 2004
                        • 250

                        #12
                        Blohm und Voss also produced the huge BV 238, more of which can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blohm_und_Voss_Bv_238

                        They even had plans for a landbased version!

                        Regards,

                        Jan

                        Comment

                        • Newforest
                          Rank 5 Registered User
                          • Apr 2005
                          • 8832

                          #13
                          Originally posted by Ja Worsley

                          Tex and Jager: whilest searching for these pics I came across the Revel model, yes it is huge and if i ever find one I will not hesitate in buying it
                          [url]https://www.easy-
                          Here is the model for sale, but don't know if they have a submarine to deliver it to you

                          The link didn't come up with the picture, but you can find it with the search option https://www.easy-shop.co.uk/secured/modelactive/scripts/searchresults.asp

                          And here is the correct link, I hope!
                          Last edited by Newforest; 21st December 2005, 15:00. Reason: Correction.
                          http://www.flightmemory.com/ I have been round the world 11.83 times!

                          Comment

                          • Jan
                            Jan
                            Rank 5 Registered User
                            • Jul 2004
                            • 250

                            #14
                            A preview of the Revell BV 222 can be found here: http://modelingmadness.com/scotts/ax...222preview.htm

                            Regards,

                            Jan

                            Comment

                            • mike currill
                              Big pistons rule
                              • Jul 2003
                              • 8791

                              #15
                              Originally posted by Steve Bond
                              My friend Heinz Roekker, the Luftwaffe night fighter ace, has told me that he was evacuated from North Africa in a BV.222, which he recalls as being "big."
                              Something of an understatement methinks.
                              The mind once expanded by a new idea never returns to its original size.

                              Comment

                              • chicken chaser
                                Member
                                • Oct 2005
                                • 38

                                #16
                                wasn't there a lake or port in the baltic? where several luftwaffe flyingboats were moored after the war,and the RAF destoyed them in a demonstration to the public.spitfires and or typhoons involved i think?

                                Comment

                                • Ja Worsley
                                  The last sane man a live!
                                  • Jan 2000
                                  • 6550

                                  #17
                                  Chick: Mate if that's true it goes to show how little fore thought was in evidence after the Allies won the war, I mean they basically destroyed a heck of a lot of good planes, ships and other weapons all in the name of wiping out a bad memory. Some of the best battleships went to an aweful grave during Atomic testing in the pacific all so that the boffins could prove that their theories worked. It's just not fair is it?
                                  It's a good thing you are short, that way you don't have to live up to a high IQ!

                                  Comment

                                  • chicken chaser
                                    Member
                                    • Oct 2005
                                    • 38

                                    #18
                                    i'm pretty sure it was part of an article in fp in the last 3 years.

                                    Comment

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