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  • aircraftclocks
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Sep 2006
    • 312

    British Library and copyright


    I recently found that the British library had a catalogue of a manufacturer who was an aircraft parts supplier from the 1950's.
    I submitted a copy request to be send to me my mail, as the other available option, encrypted PDF, requires software I do not have.
    I agreed to pay the fee which was made up of the copying fee and a copyright fee in about 50/50 in proportion.
    Got various emails, order received, order being processed etc.

    I then get an email:

    Sorry, we are unable to fulfil your order because of copyright restrictions. You can check for alternative delivery options on our website.

    Are they saying, copyright materials will only be sent in encrypted PDF form?
    Anyone with any experience in area?
  • avion ancien
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Aug 2007
    • 5246

    #2
    Not infrequently, and particularly in the case of bodies such as the National Archives, there is a belief that possession and copyright are one and the same. They are not. I'd like to put this belief down to ignorance of the law but I suspect that it's more to do with commercial exploitation of assets in their possession - which they justify by saying that copyright of the work in question is vested in them - and, I suspect, they would be less than forthcoming if asked to justify, by reference to the law, their claim to be the copyright owner. My practical suggestion to you, aircraftclocks, would be to telephone the British Library and ask to speak to someone who is the organ grinder rather than the monkey. I might then ask if I can have an appointment to view the document and say that I'd like to bring a camera with me. If you can get agreement to that, then just photograph the catalogue - and tell them not to worry because you, and not they, are 'breaching' copyright thereby!

    Comment

    • Ex Brat
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Mar 2013
      • 239

      #3
      Are you able order-up the document you require and visit BL to view? They have overhead scanners available in most reading rooms that allow for the scanning of documents to .pdf and then sending to an email address (free) or saving to a USB. They allow 5% copying of each document, which Im told my staff is about 1 chapter. They also allow documents to be photographed.

      In in general, I would say that staff are very helpful to visitors - take of that what you will.

      Comment

      • Planemike
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Dec 2007
        • 1791

        #4
        I dealt with them over the telephone last year and found them very helpful, ended up with what I was after....

        Comment

        • TonyL1962
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Mar 2014
          • 83

          #5
          Surely an encrypted pdf is just a pdf with a password - that they will give you? All you need is Adobe's Acrobat reader (or any other freely available pdf reader - one of which you probably already have) and it will prompt you for the password when you try to open it. Seems way easier than having them copy it again?

          Comment

          • aircraftclocks
            Rank 5 Registered User
            • Sep 2006
            • 312

            #6
            Thank you for all your helpful suggestions.
            While there is a direct flight to London from where I live, Google advises me I live 14470km from the British library.
            While I understand what they are trying to achieve, protect a copyright holders IP, they could have provided a more detailed explanation.
            The catalogue is 70+ years old and the company that produced it is long gone.
            Looks like I will be calling the home country soon.

            Comment

            • avion ancien
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Aug 2007
              • 5246

              #7
              I think that I can understand your difficulty ......!

              Comment

              • longshot
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Aug 2008
                • 1645

                #8
                Ex Brat...Does the National Library permit 100% photography of documents*? For comparison the National Archives at Kew permit 100% photography of documents (which sometimes include photos, in my experience)...the Imperial War Museum permit it for a daily fee of 10 which excludes photos. * Is there a difference in copyright law between a document like a parts list (never commercially available to the public) and books/magazines?

                Comment

                • Ex Brat
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Mar 2013
                  • 239

                  #9
                  longshot. The rules between National Archives, IWM, and the BL on what and how you can copy differ. The BLs interpretation could well be because they hold a copies of books, many that are within copyright: perhaps their stipulations default to take that into account?

                  BL - https://www.bl.uk/help/self-service-...d-restrictions

                  Comment

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