Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Piasecki H-21 restoration

Collapse
X
Collapse
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • heli1
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Jan 2009
    • 260

    Piasecki H-21 restoration

    The Helicoter Museum is finally starting work on its ex-ALAT H-21 tandem rotor with cockpit and cabin section now in the Conservation hangar undergoing a thorough survey.This 1956 aircrsft served in the Algerian conflict of the late 1950s and nearly ended Its days on a firing range.In the Mnths to come a search will be on to find missing parts like the cyclic columns and a set of blades if anyone has any leads.
  • J Boyle
    With malice towards none
    • Oct 2004
    • 9728

    #2
    A recent FlyPast mentioned a current Canadian restoration being made up of sections of 3 airframes. I would imagine they would have some spares.

    Rotor blades might be tricky...years ago I was told that many surplus units were cut down and used as windmills. I have absolutely no idea how accurate that is.

    There is still an airframe in a private salvage yard across the highway from Puma Air Museum in Tucson. They might have the columns.

    Also, Classic Rotors in California has the only airworthy example...They might help with blades (likely time expired), although mailing them to the UK might be difficult.

    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

    Comment

    • ericmunk
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Apr 2009
      • 1721

      #3
      Dont know if blades are interchangeable with the H-25, but theres one of those sitting in a business park in Rotterdam... doubt the owners would want to part with it/them though.

      Comment

      • J Boyle
        With malice towards none
        • Oct 2004
        • 9728

        #4
        H-25 (better known by its Navy designation HUP) blades would be too short.
        There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

        Comment

        • ZRX61
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • May 2005
          • 4719

          #5
          Local yard... been trying to catch someone actually on the premises now for about 5 years...

          If anybody ever tells you anything about an aeroplane which is so bloody complicated you can't understand it, take it from me: It's all balls. RJM.

          Comment

          • Hooligan
            Rank 5 Registered User
            • Mar 2017
            • 428

            #6
            I know Pan Am operated some Vertol 107s but that looks like a generation earlier... Did they have Piaseckis ?

            Comment

            • J Boyle
              With malice towards none
              • Oct 2004
              • 9728

              #7
              It wasn't Pan Am...it was New York Helicopter Airways.
              They famously flew from the Pan Am building. Some were operated under contract to Pan Am.
              They started with S-55s and then had Piasecki/Vertol 44s (civil H-21s) with donut floats on the wheels. Then they operated turbine Boeing Vertol 107s, finally Sikorsky S-61s.

              After that organization went bankrupt, a successor airline flew aircraft painted in Pan Am markings...Westland 30s (remember them?) and Bell 222s...but not from the Pan Am building, its helicopter was closed after a crash.
              I don't know to what extent Pan Am was involved with the organization.

              History of the helicopter maker is: PV Engineering Forum which became Piasecki then became Vertol which was bought by Boeing.

              The firm has built tandem rotor helicopters for 70 years, its first, the HRP (USN-talk for Helicopter Transport Piasecki) was the largest and most capable helicopter of its day, so it has quite a record.
              Last edited by J Boyle; 23rd March 2019, 03:39.
              There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

              Comment

              • Hooligan
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Mar 2017
                • 428

                #8
                Ah, I remember them having the Vertol 107s, I didn't know they went back beyond that. The Pan Am building accident was an S-61L that rolled on to its side if I recall and some blade wreckage ended up on the street below; several people died.

                Incidentally, if anybody is in Philadelphia and has time on their hands, there is an excellent helicopter museum at Brandywine Airport near West Chester - numerous exhibits including the locally-built H-21 and HUP-2 - well worth a visit.

                And I must get myself down to Weston-Super-Mare one of these days...

                Comment

                • J Boyle
                  With malice towards none
                  • Oct 2004
                  • 9728

                  #9
                  Both museums are excellent.
                  Sadly, many enthusiasts have neglected helicopter history, with otherwise knowledgeable people knowing nothing of them other than possibly being able to identify the Sea King, Wessex and Huey.

                  Luckily, in fairly recent times there have been some good books published on early helicopter history.

                  I find Piasecki particularly interesting, starting as it did during the war with a handful of people. The state of helicopter technology being what it was, they were learning new aerodynamics and building technology from the ground-up (as opposed to an airplane builder which "only" had to refine already well known principles).
                  Like several other fledgling firms, Frank Piasecki was based in Philadelphia, hence the location for the American Helicopter Museum.

                  In the 1990s, I sent Mr. Piasecki a nice photo of a H-21 to sign, which he did. He also included an autographed copy of his firm's history. A nice man.
                  ​​​
                  There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

                  Comment

                  • heli1
                    Rank 5 Registered User
                    • Jan 2009
                    • 260

                    #10
                    ZRX61....That H-21 in Arizona seems to have a non standard main undercarriage and a vertical exhaust pipe....self driving or towed ??
                    i recall there were a number of H-21s in the yards in thst area but most if not all now gone.

                    Comment

                    • ZRX61
                      Rank 5 Registered User
                      • May 2005
                      • 4719

                      #11
                      Originally posted by heli1 View Post
                      ZRX61....That H-21 in Arizona seems to have a non standard main undercarriage and a vertical exhaust pipe....self driving or towed ??
                      i recall there were a number of H-21s in the yards in thst area but most if not all now gone.
                      It was towed to a friends place, then the deal fell through & it was towed back. It's in Rosamond Ca.
                      If anybody ever tells you anything about an aeroplane which is so bloody complicated you can't understand it, take it from me: It's all balls. RJM.

                      Comment

                      Unconfigured Ad Widget

                      Collapse

                       

                      Working...
                      X