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  • flyingblind
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Oct 2011
    • 443

    WWI Propeller ??

    I've asked to try and help I.D. this propeller for someone who lives in my village
    I'm assuming possibly WWI?
    Any ideas as to what aircraft it was used on
    Attached Files
  • topspeed
    Get on uppah !
    • Jan 2009
    • 2660

    #2
    Awesome artefact...those are worth a small fortune in interior decoration market !
    If it looks good, it will fly good !
    -Bill Lear & Marcel Dassault


    http://max3fan.blogspot.com/

    Comment

    • Sabrejet
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Mar 2010
      • 1760

      #3
      It's from a 200-hp Beardmore Halford Pullinger (BHP) Puma engine: most likely a DH.9.

      Comment

      • flyingblind
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Oct 2011
        • 443

        #4
        I obviously know nothing about WWI aircraft but was a DH 9 a 4 bladed prop or 2 ?

        Comment

        • Sabrejet
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Mar 2010
          • 1760

          #5
          Mmm. Fair point. The boss does bear a 200HP BHP stamping. My first thought was DH.4 but IIRC that was a 160hp BHP engine. Ditto FE,2b etc.

          Mmmm.

          Comment

          • Anon
            Mike Davey
            • Jan 2008
            • 2867

            #6
            I think I can see DE H 4 on it.So, maybe it is de-H 4?

            Anon.

            Comment

            • DragonRapide
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Jun 2007
              • 1007

              #7
              Both DH9s at Duxford are 2-blade.
              Listening out for something interesting approaching...

              Comment

              • The Blue Max
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Mar 2005
                • 2126

                #8
                I would think most Likely an Fe2.
                "I see something of the cobra in you Stachel!"

                Sywell Airshow 17th August 2014

                www.sywellairshow.co.uk

                www.Biggles-Biplane.com

                Comment

                • bazv
                  olde rigger
                  • Feb 2005
                  • 5878

                  #9
                  Could only be for an FE2 if it was a Non Standard/Trial engine fit.

                  The 'BHP' stamped on the Prop could be 'Beardmore-Halford-Pullinger'

                  The science museum have a 200 H.P. bhp Aero Engine No. 5611, W.D. No. 23285 known as the Puma engine designed by Beardmore-Halford-Pullinger, developed by the Siddeley Deasy Motor Company Ltd., Coventry, built by Armstrong-Siddeley, 1917.So perhaps for an early version of the A.S. Puma

                  Was an FE2 used for engine trials perhaps ?

                  Comment

                  • bazv
                    olde rigger
                    • Feb 2005
                    • 5878

                    #10

                    From the magnificent Women website

                    Daughter of TC Pullinger - the Beardmore/Arrol Johnston designer.

                    https://www.magnificentwomen.co.uk/e...thee-pullinger


                    PULLINGER, Dorothe Aurlie Marianne m. Edward Marshall Martin, MBE, born Calais, France13 January 1894, died London 11 January 1986.

                    Aero and automobile engineer and entrepreneur. Daughter, eldest of the 12 children of Aurlie Brnice Sitwell and Thomas Charles Pullinger. Her father was a car designer who worked for several automobile manufacturers: Sunbeam, Humber and, finally, Arrol Johnston's at Paisley. Dorothe attended Loughborough Girls Grammar School, then joined her father, at the Arrol Johnston to train in the drawing office and foundry, and converted German designs from metric to imperial measurements for UK use.
                    When Arrol Johnston built a plant at Tongland, Kirkcudbright, making spare parts for aero engines, Dorothe helped design the Beardmore-Halford-Pullinger aero engine, known as the Beardmore. In World War 1, Vickers hired her to work at their massive factory in Barrow-in-Furness, to supervise 7,000female munitions workers. She started an apprenticeship scheme and football team for the women (That's her behind the goalie in the photo). she persuaded Arrol Johnstons to use women at the Tongland factory to build a car she designed for women - The Galloway (10/20 CV , 4 cylinders, capacity 1528 cc.). This was the first ever car designed specifically for women and it is still the only one to go into general production on that basis. It remained in production in a variety of versions until 1925. After her marriage in 1924, Dorothee undertook the sales side of the operation, but annoyed at accusations of stealing a mans job, she opened an innovative industrial steam laundry in Croydon, with her husband. In 1940, Nuffield recruited her to organise women recruits to munitions. She managed 13 factories during the Second World War and was the only woman on a post-war government committee formed to recruit women into factories. She moved to Guernsey where she established a new chain of industrial laundries, just in time to service the hotels in the post-war tourism boom. Awarded an MBE, she became a member of the Institute of Personnel Management and was the first woman member of the Institute of Automobile Engineers (1923). There is a plaque to her memory at Vickers, Barrow-in-Furness. She was the first woman to be inducted in the Scottish Engineering Hall of Fame (2012).
                    Last edited by bazv; 20th February 2019, 07:42.

                    Comment

                    • anneorac
                      Ex-Pat Scottish Member
                      • Jan 2000
                      • 652

                      #11
                      As Anon (Mike Davey) has already stated, it tells you on the prop! DG 1329 was the standard prop used on the BHP powered DH.4. The slight confusion over the horse power may stem from the prop having been produced for the prototype BHP engines which were rated at 200hp while the production version was a 230hp engine.

                      Anne
                      pb::

                      Comment

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