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Duxford Blenheim and Lysander passenger flights ‘coming soon’.

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  • Duxford Blenheim and Lysander passenger flights ‘coming soon’.

    This looks very interesting:

    www.aerialcollective.co.uk

  • Ant.H
    replied
    In reply to Red5, the Canadian Lanc offered passenger rides while on the UK tour in 2014. What I'm asking is that if a passenger carrying Lanc has already flown in the UK, then does it not help the case for future passenger-carrying ops with Jane?

    Leave a comment:


  • mexicanbob
    replied
    Many airplanes and registered as Experimental in the US and able to do rides for hire. That is the purpose of the Living History Flight Exemption (LHFE). One of those is the B-24 Diamond Lil. Her, FIFI & Doc are all three Experimental.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Boyle
    replied
    Agent K... re post #19

    The American B-17s that sell rides are not in the "Expirimental" category (also, there is no such thing as an "experimental" register).

    Here is the registration for "Sentimental Journey".
    Notice the classification box at the bottom of the page:
    https://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinq...umbertxt=9323Z
    ​​​​​​
    They are on "Limited" certificates which means they can do limited commercial work.
    Experimental aircraft can not be used for commercial passenger flights.
    Correction: I was mistaken about no pax flights in Experimental types as noted below...namely the B-29s (which unlike B-17s, never received limited ATCs are allowed experience flights. However, you can't use a homebuilt experimental for commercial use.
    Last edited by J Boyle; 10th December 2018, 02:41.

    Leave a comment:


  • red5
    replied
    Ant.H - As a guide to what exactly ? Not sure what you mean - the Canadian Lanc operates to Canadian rules which are not recognised in the UK so the UK Lancs have to abide by UK rules.......... ( as highlighted by Roobarb "would have a more lenient attitude from the CAA when they don't even have the approved seats fitted and would require a structural fitment modification to be stress approved, design approved and the seats and their materials and harness/lapstrap to be of an approved design and material specification"

    Leave a comment:


  • Ant.H
    replied
    Apologies for dragging the conversation even further away from the original topic, but in relation to passenger numbers on a future airworthy Lanc could the Canadian Lanc UK tour be used as a guide? I seem to remember there were more than four passengers on the flights?

    Best wishes to everyone at ARCo and fingers crossed for the permissions on the Lysander and Blenheim.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roobarb
    replied
    Isn't R4118 entitled to air his or her views like any other member of this forum? Just because an opinion is expressed that you don't agree with why do you see it necessary to make such a strong retort? I looked after a privately owned Pembroke some years ago and that was restricted on the number of passengers it could carry by the regulations of the Permit to Fly that it operated on, (being an ex military aeroplane) and could easily have filled the many seats it still had fitted when in RAF service (all with the relevant seat lapstraps etc in place) it just wan't allowed to. In the end this restriction made it less appealing for the owner to operate as he couldn't take his group of friends with him to airshows, fly-ins etc and was a strong factor on his decision to dispose of the aeroplane. What makes you think a Lancaster, Shackleton, B17 etc would have a more lenient attitude from the CAA when they don't even have the approved seats fitted and would require a structural fitment modification to be stress approved, design approved and the seats and their materials and harness/lapstrap to be of an approved design and material specification. Even if all this was carried out they still would be unlikely to allow more than two or four passengers to be carried. Would this justify the operational costs for a four engined aeroplane, I doubt it myself. Personally I agree with R4118 in that I am doubtful that I will see that particular Lancaster fly again. That's nothing against the owners or the engineers (many of whom I know personally and have worked with at Duxford and I highly respect), it's just my opinion as an enthusiast and a professional Aircraft Engineer for the last 35 years. And yes I have worked on an airworthy Lancaster in the past, and many other large four engined aircraft. Forums are for discussion and debate not for attacking someone for their different opinion. That's just being rude and arrogant.

    Leave a comment:


  • DH82EH
    replied
    "I wouldn't be surprised to see Just Jane carry g passengers to be honest! Although I personally think we won't see her with air under her wings again!"


    Instead of crapping on the project on an internet forum, why not donate a fiver?
    That'd be more productive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bluebird Mike
    replied
    Although I personally think we won't see her with air under her wings again!
    Strong statement- what makes you think that?

    I always thought that NX611 would do passenger flights the same as her Canadian cousin, it's a no-brainer for income and also a natural extension of their current interior tours and taxi rides, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Collis
    replied
    This could be handy. I need to get to France next year after Brexit. I could find some locals in hi-viz with gas lamps.

    Leave a comment:


  • R4118
    replied
    I wouldn't be surprised to see Just Jane carry g passengers to be honest! Although I personally think we won't see her with air under her wings again!

    Leave a comment:


  • Flygirl
    replied
    That is brilliant news :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • avion ancien
    replied
    Maybe they'll convert her to a Lancastrian!

    Leave a comment:


  • ~Alan~
    replied
    I wonder if "Just Jane" will be configured to carry passengers ?. It seems to work with the Canadian Lancaster.

    Leave a comment:


  • Agent K
    replied
    I too have flown in a B17 in the USA (Sentimental Journey), there were at least 5 of us if i recall, and the regulations are somehwat different. The aircraft are on the experimental register and therefore abide by more lax rules than they would have to in the UK.
    Last edited by Agent K; 7th December 2018, 09:06. Reason: typo

    Leave a comment:


  • J Boyle
    replied
    Propstrike...
    About American passenger carrying B-17s, I'm not an operator so don't take my thoughts as gospel, but I have been in several of the aircraft that carry passengers.

    I'm not aware of any substantial modifications that have been made to them. Seats are often basic troop seats along the fuselage. Certainly no extra emergency exits or anything major.
    I have a hunch the changes operators make are procedural rather than physical.
    Certainly nothing that could not be accomplished by the fine folks who fly Sally B.
    Last edited by J Boyle; 7th December 2018, 03:55.

    Leave a comment:


  • ErrolC
    replied
    Joyride is a bit frivolous, more so for jaunt/jolly/junket.
    The NZ DC-3s use 'Scenic Flight' for A-A trips, but that works better for airliners, even 70yo ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beermat
    replied
    Ha! I never know what to call it. 'Flight' is what you take with Easyjet, 'Sortie' sounds pretentious, and 'spins' are inadvisable..

    Leave a comment:


  • ErrolC
    replied
    Beermat:
    I am saving my loose change for a Blenheim trip already.
    A trip in the Blenheim, or a trip to Blenheim? :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • SADSACK
    replied
    I think for now it is a "fly with", not "fly in" situation?

    Leave a comment:

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