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FHCAM JU-87R-4 Stuka revealed

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  • R4118
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Aug 2015
    • 386

    #61
    I believe that the engine is/was done at Vintage V12s in California

    Comment

    • DoraNineFan
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Oct 2005
      • 222

      #62
      There was supposedly a 211 restored to running in Germany years ago, but I have never seen a photo or video to confirm it. And Dirke Bend in Germany was building a pair of 211s for some project 10-15 years ago but there was never a video or photo of them after completion or in testing. Kermit Weeks did a walkaround tour of Vintage V12s and it was clear that they are working on several 211s but did not specify if they were static museum display. Weeks was hoping to get a tour with Mike Nixon but he was unable to meet him at the shop. Nixon apparently has his own separate workspace where he would be focusing on special projects. I like the openness that FHC is showing with the Stuka so perhaps we will see some video of the 211 on the test stand in a while.

      Similarly, FHC has put a video about the propeller restoration on their Facebook page.
       

      Comment

      • JohnTerrell
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Apr 2010
        • 366

        #63
        With the Stuka, He-111 and Ju-88 projects owned by the FHCAM all needing operational Jumo 211's, it explains why Mike Nixon's shop has a stockpile of them (Jumo 211 work at that shop has been underway for at least a few years now). Furthermore, I've never heard of Mike Nixon's shop doing engines only for display use.

        Comment

        • Pulsar-xp
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Mar 2012
          • 158

          #64
          There is no question that Vintage V12 is one of the best, if not the best address if a rare engine has to be restored. There is also no question, that if a Merlin is leaving their workshop in our days, this engine is much more reliable than a new original engine from RR or Packard 75 years ago. The problem will be, that noboby has any experience with the Jumo engines. I am not shure, but the last time a Jumo did his job must be more than 70 years ago. So if you are restoring an old German engine, you are not able to order a new piston, a crankshaft or a complete heads and banks set from a company, which is producing these parts as certified spare parts again. If you see the trouble with the Mercedes 601 and 605 in the last years, even if they have been overhauled by Vintage V12, we can only hope, that these engines will reach a fraction of the reliability of the Merlin engines in some years. Not even speaking about the new engines of the 262. I hope nobody will missunderstand this post. Here in Germany, every friend of the historic aviation, is looking forward to see, what is happening in Seattle within the next years! Sadly, but for obvious reasons, in our country there are not too many people and companys who are willing to keep our, of course not very glorious, history alive.
          Last edited by Pulsar-xp; 17th December 2018, 01:16. Reason: fingertrouble

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          • DazDaMan
            Rank 5 Registered User
            • Aug 2003
            • 18661

            #65
            Didn't the RAFM Stuka have its engine run at St Athan?
            Daren Cogdon

            Spitfire fanatic

            Comment

            • scotavia
              scotavia
              • Nov 2005
              • 2730

              #66
              When I worked there for 9 weeks no mention of this, but heres a interesting link with many informative comments https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAcgUPjb16Q

              Comment

              • Pulsar-xp
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Mar 2012
                • 158

                #67
                There is a big difference between a ground run in a museum and an engine, which is doing its job and bringing an aircraft and it s crew in the air. Also there are some storys, that some of these engines have been badly damaged or at least seized during those ground runs.

                Comment

                • QldSpitty
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Apr 2006
                  • 2569

                  #68
                  A lot of answers here..
                  https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=379854552741775
                  "If the C.O. ask's you to be Tail End Charlie...just shoot him!!!....A Piece of Cake.
                  http://spitfirea58-27.blogspot.com.au/

                  Comment

                  • 1batfastard
                    Rank 5 Registered User
                    • Jan 2013
                    • 3337

                    #69
                    Hi All,
                    Having a mooch on't web as you do and found this courtesy of :- http://en-gb.facebook.com/aircorpsaviation/ Enjoy!.............

                    https://en-gb.facebook.com/flyingher...9854552741775/

                    EDIT: I just finished watching the video the attention to detail they are giving is just mind boggling, personally I can't wait to see the FW189 when it's time comes for releasing a similar video. Well done all.....

                    Geoff.
                    Last edited by 1batfastard; 13th April 2019, 18:58.

                    Comment

                    • Vintage
                      Rank 3 Registered User
                      • Aug 2018
                      • 24

                      #70
                      Yes, good work. The VS11 prop of course uses pressure oil from the CSU/pump to operate blade pitch change. The big difference from say a Hydromatic is that instead of operating a piston and the cam slots to move the blades, the Junkers has a hydraulic operated spur-gear type motor and drive gears in the dome to move the blades. So it is not true to say that there is a pump in the hub, it is a hydraulic motor operating with oil pressure from the CSU/pump on the engine. Also, the Jumo 211 was operated after WW2. Jumo 211 engines powered many legacy aircraft in Europe after the war. Interestingly, one of those types was the Czechoslovakian S199 developed, Jumo 211 powered Bf109G, examples of which fought in the war for Israeli independence in the late 40's. I would be interested in anyones info about the last Jumo 211 in operation? Cheers

                      SM

                      Comment

                      • DoraNineFan
                        Rank 5 Registered User
                        • Oct 2005
                        • 222

                        #71
                        Originally posted by Vintage View Post
                        Yes, good work. The VS11 prop of course uses pressure oil from the CSU/pump to operate blade pitch change. The big difference from say a Hydromatic is that instead of operating a piston and the cam slots to move the blades, the Junkers has a hydraulic operated spur-gear type motor and drive gears in the dome to move the blades. So it is not true to say that there is a pump in the hub, it is a hydraulic motor operating with oil pressure from the CSU/pump on the engine. Also, the Jumo 211 was operated after WW2. Jumo 211 engines powered many legacy aircraft in Europe after the war. Interestingly, one of those types was the Czechoslovakian S199 developed, Jumo 211 powered Bf109G, examples of which fought in the war for Israeli independence in the late 40's. I would be interested in anyones info about the last Jumo 211 in operation? Cheers

                        SM
                        And the Jumo 213s that were manufactured in France and flown in Nord seaplanes into the 1950s, and a few new engines put together with Jumo components. From the video on just the VS11 prop and from the pictures it looks like they had an entirely new prop and hub manufactured or copied from an original. From a quick glance it looks like the IAF last flew the S-199 in 1948 and the Czechoslovakians last flew them in 1957. It seems possible that the planes could have remained in legacy trainer roles after that also.
                        Last edited by DoraNineFan; 13th April 2019, 20:27.

                        Comment

                        • Vintage
                          Rank 3 Registered User
                          • Aug 2018
                          • 24

                          #72
                          Hi Dora9, Yes, I can imagine the Czechs were the last operators of the 211, unless someone knows better? I am surprised if that Hub is new made? There must be quite a few that are usable. Anyway, I guess the Vintage V12 Jumo 211 has run?

                          V

                          Comment

                          • DoraNineFan
                            Rank 5 Registered User
                            • Oct 2005
                            • 222

                            #73
                            Originally posted by Vintage View Post
                            Hi Dora9, Yes, I can imagine the Czechs were the last operators of the 211, unless someone knows better? I am surprised if that Hub is new made? There must be quite a few that are usable. Anyway, I guess the Vintage V12 Jumo 211 has run?

                            V
                            I read in one discussion that Vintage may begin testing of the 211 this month. I would be curious how long France operated their version of the Jumo 213. The last Nord 1400 seaplane was delivered into service in 1956 and in theory could have operated for a few years, maybe into the 1960s unless they were quickly phased out. Click image for larger version

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                            Comment

                            • DoraNineFan
                              Rank 5 Registered User
                              • Oct 2005
                              • 222

                              #74
                              FHC shared a very nice photo of the the new Stuka propeller that was prepared by Skycraft Services, Ltd., UK.


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