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    Interesting pics of the Ju 287

    Was researching Xplanes and came across these pics, did the 287 ever fly on ops? If so which unit had them and where were they stationed? In this set there are three distinct different planes.






    Note the Ju-88 in the hanger as well.




    It certainly was a big plane, look at the wheels, wonder why they didn't make them retractable?


    Note the large counter balance just forward of the tail, anyone know what it was there for, did the plane have serious roll issues?


    Here it is in flight giving a good plan view, note the forward sweep of the wings.




    In this pic you can see the twin nose wheels.


    Take off with Rockets, these are seen in a few of the other pics as well, conclusion would be that the plane was far heavier than intended.




    With this unusual engine arangement, noise in the cockpit must have been almost unbearable.

    It's a good thing you are short, that way you don't have to live up to a high IQ!

    #2
    God that's ugly!
    Daren Cogdon

    Spitfire fanatic

    Comment


      #3
      Was only a prototype, no operational action. Note: Those twin nosewheels are from captured/salvaged B-24.
      "Distiller ... arrogant, ruthless, and by all reports (including his own) utterly charming"

      Comment


        #4
        Forward swept wing Bomber!

        The Junkers Ju 287 was a flying testbed built to develop the technology required for a multi-engined jet bomber aircraft. It was powered by four Junkers Jumo 004 engines, featured a revolutionary swept forward wing and was built largely from scavenged components from other aircraft. The flying prototype and an unfinished second prototype were captured by the Red Army in the closing stages of World War II and the design was further developed in the Soviet Union after the end of the conflict.

        The Ju 287 was intended to provide the Luftwaffe with a bomber that could avoid interception by outrunning enemy fighters. The swept-forward wing was suggested by the project's head designer, Dr Hans Wocke as a way of providing extra lift at low airspeeds - necessary because of the poor responsiveness of early turbojets at the vulnerable times of take-off and landing. The first prototype was intended to evaluate the concept, and was cobbled together from the fuselage of a Heinkel He 177, the tail of a Junkers Ju 388, main undercarriage from a Junkers Ju 352, and nosewheels taken from crashed B-24 Liberators. Two of the Jumo 004 engines were hung under the wings, with the other two mounted in nacelles added to the sides of the forward fuselage.

        Flight tests began on August 16 1944, with the aircraft displaying extremely good handling characteristics, as well as revealing some of the problems of the forward-swept wing under some flight conditions. Tests also suggested that the aircraft would benefit from concentrating more engine mass under the wings, a feature that was to be incorporated on the subsequent prototypes. These were to have been powered by Heinkel HeS.11 engines, but because of the development problems experienced with that motor, the BMW 003 was selected in its place. The second and third prototypes were to have six of these engines, the former with a cluster of three under each wing, the latter with two under each wing and one on each side of the fuselage, as the first prototype had. These machines were to have all-new, purpose designed fuselages, and the third prototype was also to carry armament and serve as the development aircraft for a production version.

        Before the second prototype was complete, though, the Junkers factory was over-run. Wocke and his staff, along with the two prototype aircraft, were taken to the Soviet Union. There, the second prototype (returned to its original Junkers in-house designation, EF-131) was eventually finished and flown on May 23 1947, but by that time, jet development had already overtaken the Ju 287. A final much-enlarged derivative, the OKB-1 EF 140 was tested in prototype form in 1949 but soon abandoned.

        For more information about "Secret Weapons of the Luftwaffe", I recommend following link:
        http://www.luft46.com/

        fightingirish
        Sln, fightingirish
        Avatar: Ho-Yeol Ryu, Flughafen (Airport), Hannover [HAJ / EDDV] 2005

        Comment


          #5
          You guys know that the EF131 was the first Soviet jet bomber? Was much faster than anything else the Russians had, and they feared that pilots might try to skedaddle to Western Europe, so they never gave them more than 30min worth of fuel.
          "Distiller ... arrogant, ruthless, and by all reports (including his own) utterly charming"

          Comment


            #6
            I forgot some facts:

            Junkers Ju 287 V1


            Description
            Role Bomber prototype
            Crew two, pilot and co-pilot

            Dimensions
            Length 18.30m 60'
            Wingspan 20.11m 65' 11"
            Height 4.70m 15'
            Wing area 61m 655ft

            Weights
            Empty 12,500kg 27,500 lb
            Loaded 20,000kg 44,000 lb
            Maximum take-off ???

            Powerplant
            Engines 4x Junkers Jumo 004B-1 turbojets
            Power 35.3kN 8,182 lb

            Performance

            Maximum speed 560km/h 348 mph
            Range 980km 1570 miles
            Service ceiling 9,400m 30,000ft
            Rate of Climb 575m/min 1,840ft/min

            Armament
            Guns None
            production version was to have
            2x 13mm MG 131 machine guns
            in tail turret
            Bombs None
            production version was to carry
            4,000kg (8,800 lbs)

            Anyway, it is the big ugly grandfather of the Grumman X-29, HansaJet and Su-47!
            fightingirish
            Sln, fightingirish
            Avatar: Ho-Yeol Ryu, Flughafen (Airport), Hannover [HAJ / EDDV] 2005

            Comment


              #7
              fightingirish: Thanks for the facinating insight to this ugly but productive plane. I wonder if the Russians will ever divuldge any details of secret projects of their post war trials aircraft, not only this one but any others they might have had?
              It's a good thing you are short, that way you don't have to live up to a high IQ!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Ja Worsley


                Note the large counter balance just forward of the tail, anyone know what it was there for, did the plane have serious roll issues?
                Suspect that this is in fact a mounted cine camera to view the airflow - the fuselage has tufts of wool on it...

                Flood.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I wonder what the noise level was like in the cockpit.
                  mmitch.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    that is a cine camera flood.

                    coanda

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Well that's that cleared up, thanks guys.
                      It's a good thing you are short, that way you don't have to live up to a high IQ!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I wonder what the PFA would have made of it?!
                        Daren Cogdon

                        Spitfire fanatic

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Junkers engineers in the USSR

                          Hi folks, hi Ja Worsley,

                          after WW II. Wocke, Baade and a lot of other Junkers engineers and technics were forced to work for several years in the Soviet Union where they developed several military jets.
                          The OKB-1 EF 140 was a prototype aircraft developed in the Soviet Union originally conceived as a bomber, but later considered as a reconnaissance machine. The aircraft was a follow-on from the Junkers Ju 287 bomber prototype, but while it used the same basic layout and engineering concepts, it was an entirely new design by Brunolf Baade.

                          Only one EF 140 was actually built, and began flight tests on March 15 1949, using Rolls-Royce Nene engines as the intended Mikulin units were not yet ready. The project was cancelled before the second prototype was complete.

                          Baade and his team developed at the OKB from S.M. Alexejew then in 1948 the OKB-1 EF 150 as a bomber. It didn't have forward-swept wings anymore, because the sucess of back-swept wings (35) . It had 2 engines, Ljulka AL-5 with 2*5000 kp, on pylons under the wings (80) and a "bicycle" landing gear configuration ( just like the Boeing B-47 ). This gear configuratin was tested on the the experimentel fighter IL-215.
                          Construction began in 1951 of the first prototype, which flew first on the 05.Oktober 1952 in Lu-chowitzy. Until April 1953 EF-150 flew 16 times. It had problems with landing gear and brakes configuration. On 09.Mai 1953, during landings trails the brake parachute suddenly opened so the fuselage, engines and gears got heavily dameged. At that time there was competion between the OKBs in the USSR. The IL-28 Beagle first flew 1950, the TU-88, aka Tu-16 Badger first flew in winter 1953, so they had no need for the EF-150.The plane EF-150 was eventually scrapped.
                          Wocke and Baade returned to Germany from 1950 to 1954 and took part in the development of the East-German aeronautics industry. As chief developer of the VEB Flugzeugwerft Dresden Hans Wocke was involved in the construction of the first German passenger jet "152" (also called "Baade 152").
                          But in 1957 Wocke went to West-Germany (before the first flight of the "152" in 1958), where he came to the Hamburger Flugzeugbau (HFB). The design of HansaJet was started in March 1961. It was intended primarily as a 6/11-seat executive transport, but was projected also as 12-passenger feeder-liner and for a variety of military duties. The prototype of the HFB 320 Hansa Jet reg. D-CHFB took off for first flight at Hamburg-Finkenwerder by Loren William Davis and H. Bardill on April 21st, 1964. The flight lasted for 73 minutes and went to Bremen-Lemwerder. The first deliv-ery to a customer was to General Air of Hamburg in March 1968. Two prototypes and 45 aircraft were produced.

                          Here some facts over OKB-1 EF 140

                          Description

                          Role Bomber/reconnaisance prototype
                          Crew: 3

                          Dimensions
                          Length 19.70m 63'
                          Wingspan 19.40m 62' 1"
                          Height 5.70m 18' 3"
                          Wing area 58.4m 627ft

                          Weights
                          Empty 12,500kg 27,500 lb
                          Loaded 24,500kg 53,900 lb
                          Maximum take-off 27,000kg 59,400 lb

                          Powerplant
                          Engines 2x Mikulin AM-01 turbojets
                          Power 68.7kN 15,400 lb

                          Performance
                          Maximum speed 1,230km/h 767 mph
                          Range 2,500km 1,558 miles
                          Service ceiling 12,300m 40,000ft
                          Rate of Climb

                          Armament
                          Guns 4x 23mm machine guns
                          in 2 remotely-controlled turrets
                          Bombs None
                          production version was to carry
                          4,500kg (9,900 lbs)

                          The facts of the EF-150 I have only found in russian:
                          http://legion.wplus.net/guide/air/b/150.shtml
                          Facts over the Baade 152 or HansaJet, just google around!
                          And, at last, some pics:
                          Last edited by fightingirish; 24th February 2007, 14:32.
                          Sln, fightingirish
                          Avatar: Ho-Yeol Ryu, Flughafen (Airport), Hannover [HAJ / EDDV] 2005

                          Comment


                            #14
                            1. EF 140
                            2. IL- 215 ("bicycle" landing gear configuration test bed!)
                            3. EF 150
                            4. Ju 287
                            5. Early version EF 150

                            And some more pic's:
                            6. EF 140
                            7. First German passenger jet "152" (also called "Baade 152")
                            8. EF 150
                            9. HFB 320 Hansa Jet D-CHFB before the first flight

                            So, hope you all enjoy the part of german-russian aviation history!

                            See you,

                            fightingirish
                            Last edited by fightingirish; 24th February 2007, 14:32.
                            Sln, fightingirish
                            Avatar: Ho-Yeol Ryu, Flughafen (Airport), Hannover [HAJ / EDDV] 2005

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Blimey! A veritable mine of info! Thanks fightingirish!
                              Daren Cogdon

                              Spitfire fanatic

                              Comment


                               

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