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    Help Required Identifying this Early Aircraft

    Hi there, I recently acquired a large collection of photographs from the golden age of flight, c1920-1940. I've been having fun identifying the planes but there are some I'm having trouble with. Any help is appreciated!
    Attached Files

    #2
    An Aeronca C.2 , I think a Fairchild KR.34 and a Curtiss CW. 22B

    John
    Last edited by John Aeroclub; 10th October 2017, 23:06.

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      #3
      Excellent! Thank you, John!

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        #4
        Any help identifying these three is also appreciated.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by Gypsum; 11th October 2017, 00:47.

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          #5
          I reckon photo 2 is the Curtiss-Wright AT-9 Jeep.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:C..._Jeep_USAF.jpg

          Not that I'd ever heard of it, but the shape of the fin and rudder looked familiar.
          Last edited by dhfan; 11th October 2017, 00:02.

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            #6
            Looks like a match to me! Thanks for the help!

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              #7
              Nr 1 of the lower photos is a Bell XFM-1 Airacuda. 1937-1940 Twin engine pusher. An attempt by Bell to build a bomber destroyer aircraft!

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                #8
                Awesome, thanks for the info!

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                  #9
                  3rd one is Curtiss A-1/O-3 Falcon

                  Chris

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                    #10
                    Kermit Weeks has a CW.22, and according to Wiki the RAF flew some ex-Burmese examples.
                    The AT-9 was a multi-engined trainer, very few survive, one is in the USAF museum. Unlike many wartime types, it never had a civil career, two seats and two thirsty engines with no practical civil application.
                    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

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                      #11
                      Curtiss-Wright AT-9 Jeep
                      LINK - http://axis-and-allies-paintworks.co...opic.php?13451

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                        #12
                        Thanks for the help everyone, it is much appreciated! I have three more unidentified planes here. Any ideas?
                        Attached Files

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                          #13
                          The first aircraft is an Aeronca LB. The Navy seems to have tested one, hence the military colours.

                          The next aircraft is well known, a Northrop Delta.

                          The final photo is of a Ford Tri-Motor. Without a better view or "N number" I can't tell whether it's a 4-AT or a 5-AT.
                          Last edited by J Boyle; 11th October 2017, 18:40.
                          There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

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                            #14
                            Excellent, thanks for your help!

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                              #15
                              I feel like I've come across this particular plane before but am currently drawing a blank. Anyone know what it is? Thanks!
                              Attached Files

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                                #16
                                It's a Boeing P12 - once you know that, it's easy to read the last character of the caption! Looks a trifle bent.

                                Adrian
                                "Snow clearing equipment has been found under snowdrift" - message sent from RNAS Hatston, Orkney, 1944.

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                                  #17
                                  Ah, thanks Adrian! I figured out it was a Boeing, but of course I couldn't find the "IX".

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                                    #18
                                    Specifically, it's a P-12E.

                                    The field listed is in the Canal Zone.
                                    Note the later radio antenna.
                                    Also, noted the Navy-style (F4B-3/4) headrest, which holds a life raft, something that would have been added for use in Panama.
                                    In fact, in period they were called the "Panama headrest".
                                    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

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                                      #19
                                      Thanks for the info J Boyle, much appreciated! I have three more I can't seem to identify. Anyone know what they are?
                                      Attached Files

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                                        #20
                                        The helicopter is a Sikorsky R-6, basically the R-4 engine and rotors in a more streamlined airframe.
                                        Anywhere produced under license by Nash Kelvinator, a division of the Nash automobile company better known for making innovative refrigerators.
                                        About 200 were produced, many going to the UK as Hoverfly IIs (the R-4 was the Hoverfly I).

                                        Can you provide more contrast in the first photo?
                                        I have a hunch what it might be, but really need a better photo.
                                        I've seen the other aircraft, clearly a racing ship, but can't put my finger on a name.
                                        Last edited by J Boyle; 15th October 2017, 05:33.
                                        There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

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