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Aerospace Bristol merged with Bristol Freighter for UK

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    #21
    It would be a real shame if the Freighter is prevented from coming 'home' due to the cost of it as freight!
    Give a man a fish and eat for a day. Give a man a fishing rod and he'll eat for a lifetime. Give a man religion and he'll die praying for a fish!

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      #22
      I can recall reading a story about passenger fares on those cross-channel flights.

      Apparently, due to objections from established passenger airlines, the Super Freighter operators could only carry as passengers the occupants of the vehicles they were transporting - passengers on foot were not allowed.

      Then someone twigged that if you had a bicycle, it counted as a 'vehicle' - so, once your bike was stowed, you were allowed as a passenger - which turned out to be a cheap way of flying the channel.

      I think it ended up with some enterprising person hiring out bicycles at the departure terminal to meet the demand.

      I suspect it's just an apocryphal tale - but interesting if true.

      Presumably the lawyers for the established passenger airlines got it stopped?

      Can anyone confirm? - or shoot down ??

      Ken
      Flanker Freak & Russian Aviation Enthusiast.
      Flankers (& others) website at :-
      http://flankers.co.uk/

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        #23
        REALLY hope this happens! remember living, going to school near Bishops Stortford late 70's early 80's ? and often seeing, HEARING a Bristol Freighter slowly making its way somewhere...MAGIC, guess this was the last one flying?

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          #24
          Back in the summer and by chance I met one of the people involved in this project, he didn't know i had a knowledge let alone an interest in aviation but during conversations about something entirely different it was mentioned about this Bristol Freighter which totally surprised me and what i will say there is no lack of determination and enthusiasm from what i heard that i believe it will be happening.

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            #25
            Originally posted by Flanker_man View Post
            I can recall reading a story about passenger fares on those cross-channel flights.

            Apparently, due to objections from established passenger airlines, the Super Freighter operators could only carry as passengers the occupants of the vehicles they were transporting - passengers on foot were not allowed.

            Then someone twigged that if you had a bicycle, it counted as a 'vehicle' - so, once your bike was stowed, you were allowed as a passenger - which turned out to be a cheap way of flying the channel.

            I think it ended up with some enterprising person hiring out bicycles at the departure terminal to meet the demand.

            I suspect it's just an apocryphal tale - but interesting if true.

            Presumably the lawyers for the established passenger airlines got it stopped?

            Can anyone confirm? - or shoot down ??

            Ken
            Not sure about the Bristol Freighter ( never had the chance to fly in one ) but I did fly "foot passenger" on a Carvair Southend to Ostend in 1969 at a very reasonable rate.

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              #26
              Originally posted by Oxcart View Post
              It would be a real shame if the Freighter is prevented from coming 'home' due to the cost of it as freight!
              This takes you to their website with details of how you can help by donating.
              http://www.aerospacebristol.org/freighter
              "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."(Mary Baker Eddy)

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                #27
                And a comprehensive history of the Bristol Freighter service in New Zealand at

                http://rnzaf.proboards.com/thread/11951

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                  #28
                  We drove back from Gibraltar after my father's posting there ended in 1957 to somewhere in France, and then flew on a Freighter to Southend.
                  I remember fondly an Airfix model of a Freighter as a child, seem to remember the cargo doors opened.

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                    #29
                    Originally posted by Meddle View Post
                    There is the mortal remains of C-FDFC at Enstone.
                    The cockpit area of this one was removed from that site years ago to a private residence, although other parts do remain at Enstone.
                    Last edited by Consul; 16th December 2016, 10:28.
                    "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."(Mary Baker Eddy)

                    Comment


                      #30
                      Originally posted by Ex Brat
                      There is a comprehensive history of the Bristol Freighter and its service with Siver City Airways in Air Commodore 'Taffy' Powells's book, Ferryman.

                      The most comprehensive story of the Bristol Freighter design, production and use is in the hefty book about the type published not that long back by Air-Britain and still available.
                      Last edited by Consul; 16th December 2016, 10:30.
                      "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."(Mary Baker Eddy)

                      Comment


                        #31
                        Originally posted by Scramble Bill View Post
                        REALLY hope this happens! remember living, going to school near Bishops Stortford late 70's early 80's ? and often seeing, HEARING a Bristol Freighter slowly making its way somewhere...MAGIC, guess this was the last one flying?

                        Nice memory - it was probably G-BISU you heard while still operating with Atlantic Air Transport / Instone. At that time it was not the sole example flying in the world as other examples were still in commercial use in Canada for some time after that. Ironically, G-BISU itself was later sold in Canada but was subsequently flown back to the UK but sadly crashed at Enstone. The very last flying B.170 flew in Canada and is now preserved at Wetaskiwin, Alberta.
                        Last edited by Consul; 16th December 2016, 10:41.
                        "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."(Mary Baker Eddy)

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                          #32
                          Originally posted by ericmunk View Post
                          There was a pretty decent plan some years ago to bring over another Canadian example for a private party. Haven't heard any more on that project, but could be that one too?
                          That plan failed sadly and that example ended up staying in Canada, but fortunately it did get preserved and flew the type's last ever flight to its present home of the Reynolds Air Museum at Wetaskiwin, Alberta where it is on show.
                          Last edited by Consul; 16th December 2016, 10:42.
                          "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."(Mary Baker Eddy)

                          Comment


                            #33
                            Originally posted by Chris Cussen View Post
                            I remember fondly an Airfix model of a Freighter as a child, seem to remember the cargo doors opened.
                            Ah, that model would have been the Mk. 32 Superfreighter, which had an extended nose. I had one too! I also remember the sad line of engineless BAF Superfreighters, alongside the entrance road at Lydd in the late sixties, presumably awaiting the scrapman's torch.
                            Last edited by avion ancien; 16th December 2016, 18:07. Reason: Spelling.....

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                              #34
                              The most comprehensive story of the Bristol Freighter design, production and use is in the hefty book about the type published not that long back by Air-Britain and still available.
                              OK, let me put my post another way;

                              Taffy Powell's book includes the story of Silver City Airways and its Bristol Freighter fleet. Since Taffy set up and ran the Company it will answer the various questions regarding how they made money with them, and what they were allowed to carry in the way of freight, vehicles and people.

                              OK?

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                                #35
                                Remember watching G-BISU doing circuits at Coventry. And I'm sure that it was from the same ac, that I witnessed horses being unloaded at Staverton (presumably from Ireland) at the time of the Cheltenham Cup. Shame that there are none now flying, but pleased that a number are being cared for, and applaud the efforts of bringing one to th UK.

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                                  #36
                                  Originally posted by TexanTrev View Post
                                  Remember watching G-BISU doing circuits at Coventry. And I'm sure that it was from the same ac, that I witnessed horses being unloaded at Staverton (presumably from Ireland) at the time of the Cheltenham Cup. Shame that there are none now flying, but pleased that a number are being cared for, and applaud the efforts of bringing one to th UK.

                                  Absolutely, I got several trips in RAAF Bristol Freighters out on Air test after deep overhaul at their Edinburgh Field facility back in early 1960's. (I was on Blue Steel Trials with 4 JSTU RAF ). We had an Airframes RAF Cpl out there who was on loan to RAAF and he was the Bristol Freighter man. Myself and other JSTU Airmen who liked being around these old aircraft got fixed up with trips left right and centre. I did several Air tests in Dakota's and one flight in a Meteor T7.
                                  The RAAF were quite happy to let around 3 or 4 of us on board these transports along with the RAF Cpl who on the Bristol Freighters was specifically there to check on aircraft systems in flight, one of which was the cargo area heating. This consisted of ducts around the sides of cargo bay that fed air in from the nose area, but was heated by some strange heath Robinson heater that ran on Avgas and was continually catching fire, as it did on one trip I was on. You see, in the Bristol Freighter, the 2 pilots sat up above the cargo area and were remote from events down there. So we and the Cpl were left to our own devices, (No Loadmasters there M8--- She'll be right ,--- no intercom to Cpl either, as well as no seats for us, we just piled on board, a "G/Day" from the pilots and off we went.) These guys were quite competent and I never got worried, except when the heater caught fire but Yer man doused that with an on board hand carry extinguisher. The pilots wern't worried in the slightest, this was normal for a Bristol Freighter. The Air tests would cover engine wind downs and back up, a handling check and get as close to stall as they could without it actually "Flipping". So looking back now to those times, I realize how lucky we were to be in right place at right time. A lovely big contraption was the Bristol Freighter, so yes, definately, we need to have at least one back in UK. I guess no chance of a flyer though and even if it did happen, no chance for a repeat for me after some 50 years plus. Must admit, that one in Canada on edge of a lake looks interesting too. Will follow this thread indeed, bring it on boys.

                                  Bill T.

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                                    #37
                                    Just picked up on this thread.
                                    You might be interested in these pictures taken at Duxford in 1987

                                     photo Freighter 87c_zpsndzc0jkg.jpg

                                    http:// photo Freighter 87b_zps2w6zwkzd.jpg

                                    Comment


                                      #38
                                      #22 flamker: bikes as "vehicles": parastatal (i.e: owned by you & me) BEAC was UK's monopoly scheduled carrier, UK/Europe, 1947 into mid-1960s. All, let me repeat, all scheduled pax. was on first offer to BEAC. They took anything worthwhile. Dregs could be bid for by tramps, who normally must enter "Associate Agreements" (=royalty scheme) to avoid a BEAC objection (veto) to the Regulator. Even Lundy -Barnstaple. So from 1948 the Lympne-Le Touquet Freighter Mk.21 2 cars service paid BEAC to be left alone. I do not know if the bike story is so, but scheduled foot pax could not be "diverted" from BEAC (1953: 3 car Mk.32; 1954: Lydd-le Touquet). From 1956 they flew Mk.21 Wayfarers all pax, Lydd-Le Touquet/Ostend and carried me, not as a scheduled service pax, but on an Inclusive Tour charter package. wef 5/56 they operated "Silver Arrow" schedules, Victoria-(Lydd- Le Touquet-) Paris/(Lydd-Ostend) - Brussels: 32 seat Wayfarers (5/58: 60 seat Mk.32 Super Wayfarers). This was a copy of Skyways Coach-Air Dakotas wef 9/55, Victoria -(Lympne-Beauvais) - Paris, which I believe to have been the first breach in BEAC's "Associate Agreement" cartel, with the Regulator accepting (to be Freddie Laker's "forgotten man of air travel" argument), market expansion, not piracy.

                                      So: why on earth did anyone operate T.170 pax-only? Well, in 1943 when Bristol had been funded to enter the airline sector (to be T.167 Brabazon), something had to keep them going till then, after Victory. Hence the cargo tub on Bombay wing, funded for the Burma Campaign. All-pax was added on the assumption that C-46, C-47 would not be civil certificated or sold at scrap rates. Such sales as were secured were either on Aid or barter, or to folk who had problems accessing $ to keep Pratts turning.
                                      Last edited by alertken; 20th December 2016, 10:24.

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                                        #39
                                        hi,
                                        over on Aviation for All there's a post about bringing a B.170 to the UK for display at Filton, aerospacebristoll.org/freighter/ would be nice to have one in the UK. Only 11 complete a/c out of 214 built, and non in Europe...


                                        regards,
                                        jack...

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                                          #40
                                          Hi Jack,
                                          That's what this thread is about. Hopefully in the near future some new info can be shared.
                                          "those who know keep quiet, and those who don't are frowned upon for asking." - snafu

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