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Lysanders in the film Allied

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  • CADman
    Rank 5 Registered User

    Lysanders in the film Allied

    Watched the film Allied and just wanted to comment on the aviation content.
    If you want to read the story line Google will provide several film reviews.
    No 'real' aircraft appear in the film but several scenes are based around an airfield populated by CGI Lancasters and Lysanders.
    However one full scale mockup (FSM) Lysander does appear several times serial V9875. From the film this looks quiet good and is seen moving under its own power with prop rotating, but that could easily be film trickery. So the question is who owns the FSM and where is it ?

    My own searches have found that V9875 is actually on the BAPC register as BAPC371 There is also a tweet from somebody at Shirburn Castle (?) showing a photo of the the Lysander FSM, although they seemed more interested in the fact that Brad Pitt was there as well.
  • K4235
    Rank 5 Registered User

    #2
    The full scale (FSM) Lysander 'V9785 MA-J' was built by Shoot Aviation at White Waltham at looked very realistic

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    • Consul
      Rank 5 Registered User

      #3
      I thought it was built by Gateguards - or was their example used in a different production? See this link for detailed illustrations of the superb outcome:
      http://www.gateguardsuk.com/special-...sander/4162221
      "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."(Mary Baker Eddy)

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      • K4235
        Rank 5 Registered User

        #4
        Suppose I had better reword that then (was with Shoot Aviation)!

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        • Fouga23
          Rank 5 Registered User

          #5
          I thought it was build by Gate Guards UK?
          Edit: nevermind
          Last edited by Fouga23; 15th December 2016, 12:55.
          Magister Aviation
          It's all in my book

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          • J Boyle
            With malice towards none

            #6
            Where is it now?
            There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

            Comment

            • CADman
              Rank 5 Registered User

              #7
              Thanks for the info and link to Gate Guards website most interesting.

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              • T6flyer
                Rank 5 Registered User

                #8
                I can state 100% that the Lysander was indeed built by Gateguards at Newquay.

                Martin

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                • Fouga23
                  Rank 5 Registered User

                  #9
                  Let's hope it finds it's way into a museum
                  Magister Aviation
                  It's all in my book

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                  • bradleygolding
                    Rank 5 Registered User

                    #10
                    That is an impressive replica, although the main wheels look too small to me. I wonder why they did not use the one at Shuttleworth?

                    Steve
                    75-Stay alive, 76-Radio tricks, 77-Going to Heaven.

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                    • T6flyer
                      Rank 5 Registered User

                      #11
                      Originally posted by bradleygolding View Post
                      That is an impressive replica, although the main wheels look too small to me. I wonder why they did not use the one at Shuttleworth?

                      Steve
                      The airframe was built using drawings, plans and countless photos and with wonderful assistance from ARC at Duxford. The wheels were the closest that could be find in size to the real thing, otherwise they wouldn't have fitted the spats. The Lysander had to be taxiied over a ploughed field at 30mph and it was believe I deemed too much of a risk to use such a valuable machine as the airworthy example. Even though the replica cost a considerable amount of money (as all do), it was thought to be the safer option.

                      Martin

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                      • bradleygolding
                        Rank 5 Registered User

                        #12
                        Thanks Martin, that does make sense.

                        Steve
                        75-Stay alive, 76-Radio tricks, 77-Going to Heaven.

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                        • CADman
                          Rank 5 Registered User

                          #13
                          Mention has been made of using Shuttleworth's Lysander, I would guess that filming schedules would mean that guaranteeing the Shuttleworth aircraft being available could have been an issue, especially in February.

                          Question for Martin. Can you explain the method of power for the replica, having seen the film I had assumed it had a small motor to turn the propeller and was simply towed across the grass. It sounds a lot more complex.
                          Also assume as a film prop it was designed from the start to be easily transportable, but how durable is the structure and its outer covering, I am thinking about its long term reuse or preservation ?

                          Sorry for so many questions.

                          Comment

                          • aeronut 2008
                            Rank 5 Registered User

                            #14
                            Originally posted by Fouga23 View Post
                            Let's hope it finds it's way into a museum
                            And undercover as well.
                            I can think of a couple of UK museums to whom its loan would be appropriate as they have connections with Lysander operations but no Lysander on display.

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                            • T6flyer
                              Rank 5 Registered User

                              #15
                              Originally posted by CADman View Post
                              Mention has been made of using Shuttleworth's Lysander, I would guess that filming schedules would mean that guaranteeing the Shuttleworth aircraft being available could have been an issue, especially in February.

                              Question for Martin. Can you explain the method of power for the replica, having seen the film I had assumed it had a small motor to turn the propeller and was simply towed across the grass. It sounds a lot more complex.
                              Also assume as a film prop it was designed from the start to be easily transportable, but how durable is the structure and its outer covering, I am thinking about its long term reuse or preservation ?

                              Sorry for so many questions.
                              No problem at all. Have been and spoken to the engineers involved (as it was before my time) and the airframe was made to be transported in three parts. Everything was built as close as it could be to the real thing, with panels and items borrowed from ARC. All wings and fuselage structures were built to the original specifications with work farmed out to various general aviation companies for the wings and fuselages to be covered. In all instances it was built to replicate a Lysander and that is what it did. It is believed that someone from the film company bought the airframe after the completion of filming.

                              As to the power that was run using a small electric motor and was just meant for static shots. I believe that the airframe was incapable of moving under its own power.

                              Martin

                              Last edited by T6flyer; 16th December 2016, 11:16.

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                              • CeBro
                                Rank 5 Registered User

                                #16
                                I saw the film yesterday and was suitably impressed by the aviation side of things, even the He-177 bit.

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                                • Fournier Boy
                                  Rank 5 Registered User

                                  #17
                                  The FSM Lysander is currently for sale through an aviation brokers website, Price on Application.

                                  FB

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                                  • bradleygolding
                                    Rank 5 Registered User

                                    #18
                                    I finally got to see this film yesterday and thought it was an absolutely dreadful movie. In fact I can't think of one nice thing to say about any aspect of it so I should probably stop now. It did raise the public profile of Lysanders I suppose, there one good thing. All I can draw from this experience is that modern filmmakers have lost the ability to make war movies, this does not bode well for Dunkirk.

                                    Steve
                                    75-Stay alive, 76-Radio tricks, 77-Going to Heaven.

                                    Comment

                                    • Firebird
                                      Avons with attitude

                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by bradleygolding View Post
                                      All I can draw from this experience is that modern filmmakers have lost the ability to make war movies, this does not bode well for Dunkirk.
                                      Indeed.

                                      The stills from set of the filming of the 'new' Dunkirk is enough to put me off seeing it.

                                      But, the reason these modern filmmakers want to make these films today, isn't the same as the filmmakers making 'war films' in years gone by.
                                      I was with it all the way until letting the brakes off..........

                                      Comment

                                      • Matty
                                        Rank 5 Registered User

                                        #20
                                        Modern film makers? The director is 64 years old Robert Zemeckis who has been making movies since the 70s.

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