Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Memorial Forest For WW2 RAF Pilot?

Collapse
X
Collapse
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • Mothminor
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Dec 2012
    • 993

    Memorial Forest For WW2 RAF Pilot?

    I have been told that a small forest on Tewsgill Hill near Crawford in South Lanarkshire was planted to commemorate a Spitfire pilot, Ian Thomson, killed in 1945. The forest is in the shape of his initials. I have tried googling all possible spelling variations of his name but cannot find anything on this. Can anyone please tell me if this story is correct? Here is the location -

    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/...8306ecf23a3f77

    Clearly visible from the M74 -

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Forest.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	52.5 KB
ID:	3728632
  • Richard gray
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Jan 2006
    • 489

    #2
    Another myth.

    Have found no mention of any crash nr Crawford. Nor any relevant Ian Thomson on CWGC A few Thompsons but none to link to Crawford.

    If you was planting a forest to commemorate someone, surely you would plant it with the letters the same size and parallel to each other.

    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/...a3f77?hl=en-GB

    Comment

    • g6hyf
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Jan 2000
      • 516

      #3
      Now this has jogged my memory to something I seem to recall once pointed out by a rail tour commentator. Is there a woodland planted in the UK in the Free French symbol to commemorate a WWII loss.?

      Clive.

      Comment

      • bazv
        olde rigger
        • Feb 2005
        • 5886

        #4
        I have heard about this wood before - many years ago !
        Apparently there may have been a fairly substantial article in the Sunday Post about it.

        Of course the crash/accident may have been nowhere near Crawford/Lockerbie,it may not have been a spitfire,the surname might not have been Thompson and the pilots father might have been a local forester or similar - I do not have any recent info.
        There may well be some basis to this story !

        Comment

        • D1566
          Needs retiring.
          • Apr 2006
          • 2128

          #5
          There is a (roughly) heart-shaped wood in the Lune Gorge, just south of Tebay, which was supposedly planted in memory of a WWI casualty. I am not sure whether it was aviation related, but it could have figured in a rail tour commentators script, given its proximity to the West Coast Main Line.
          Martin

          Comment

          • adrian_gray
            Which idiot let HIM in?
            • Jan 2000
            • 3018

            #6
            Sliding further from the topic, spot the wood planted by German POWs in WW1:

            https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/...b007c5953c9c7d

            (pretty much central, three quarters of the way up the page, if it works, if not just Google Henley on Thames, hit Maps, hit Earth)

            Adrian
            "Snow clearing equipment has been found under snowdrift" - message sent from RNAS Hatston, Orkney, 1944.

            Comment

            • Richard gray
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Jan 2006
              • 489

              #7
              Now you have made me a little cross

              It's a Victoria cross not an Iron one, still guess it has the oak leaves though.

              http://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-...r-fiction.html

              Comment

              • adrian_gray
                Which idiot let HIM in?
                • Jan 2000
                • 3018

                #8
                Well, well. Thank you for putting me right, Richard.

                Adrian
                "Snow clearing equipment has been found under snowdrift" - message sent from RNAS Hatston, Orkney, 1944.

                Comment

                • RetreatingBlade
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Jan 2007
                  • 115

                  #9
                  I saw this when I cycled through Crawford about 5 years ago. I thought maybe it represented a sledge hammer in some kind of acknowledgement of the hammering that must have gone on in the area to get the East Coast main line through there.

                  OTH, I thought it might have a been a farmer planting a wood in the shape of a huge willy.....

                  If things don't change, they'll stay the way they are.

                  Comment

                  • bazv
                    olde rigger
                    • Feb 2005
                    • 5886

                    #10
                    It could be that (if it is indeed memorial initials) it is laid out in such a manner that the letters only look correct from a certain vantage point/angle - I have only had a few fleeting glimpses over the years from the A74 !

                    Similar to cricket green adverts which are an odd shape but appear ok ish on the TV screen because of the shallow angle.

                    Still working on the theory that it was laid out by a local man to in remembrance of a son !

                    Comment

                    Unconfigured Ad Widget

                    Collapse

                     

                    Working...
                    X