Register Free

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Short Belfast Status - Cairns Airport - Updated to April 2018

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Short Belfast Status - Cairns Airport - Updated to April 2018

    Short Belfast - photographed at Cairns Airport (North Queensland, Australia) a week ago - 23 Sep 2014. Still intact, and with auxiliary power supplied.

    Regards,
    ...geoff
    Attached Files
    ...converting fuel to noise.

    #2
    Thanks for those. Good to see she is still well cared for!


    Rob
    Facebook page
    https://www.facebook.com/Westland.Wy...tif_t=page_fan

    Comment


      #3
      Is she a flyer ?
      Engine Failure:.... A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air.

      Comment


        #4
        I certainly hope so! In all-white, the Belslow is just crying out to be named Moby Dick, isn't it?

        Adrian
        "Snow clearing equipment has been found under snowdrift" - message sent from RNAS Hatston, Orkney, 1944.

        Comment


          #5
          Tyres look a little "square" on the bottoms! I don't think she's moved an inch for quite some time...

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks for sharing Geoff. Would love to see her resurected. My entire Belfast live experince is about 8 seconds long. I caught one on short final while driving near an airport in Ohio, USA (think it was Cleveland), late 90's. Mrs. Sandiego89 was not as impressed and said I should focus on the road.

            Comment


              #7
              I do hope she finds her way back to Britain one day, even if it seems unlikely. Nice though it is to have a Belfast under cover at Cosford, it would be good to have another one to admire. If only some enterprising cargo company in the UK would take her on

              Comment


                #8
                Do we know how many are left around the world ?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Yes - 2.

                  There were only 10 built - here are their names and fates:


                  Samson - RAF Serial XR362 (used registration G-ASKE for overseas test flight), sold as G-BEPE then scrapped
                  Goliath - RAF Serial XR363, sold as G-OHCA then scrapped
                  Pallas - RAF Serial XR364, sold as scrap to Rolls-Royce who recovered the Tyne engines
                  Hector - RAF Serial XR365, sold as G-HLFT then as 9L-LDQ operating with HeavyLift Cargo Airlines, now RP-C8020 (see images above)
                  Atlas - RAF Serial XR366, sold to RR for engines
                  Heracles - RAF Serial XR367 - sold as G-BFYU then scrapped
                  Theseus - RAF Serial XR368, sold as G-BEPS then in storage at Southend Airport - Began being broken up 22/Oct/2008
                  Spartacus - RAF Serial XR369, sold as G-BEPL then scrapped
                  Ajax - RAF Serial XR370, sold to RR for engines
                  Enceladus - RAF Serial XR371, preserved as an exhibit at RAF Museum Cosford
                  Germany, Austria and Italy are standing together in the middle of the pub, when Serbia bumps into Austria, and spills Austria's pint.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    When I saw her...probably five months ago...they had work stands up, paying attention to the port outboard engine.
                    The cargo ramp was down as well.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I wonder what RR have done with the engines ?
                      Engine Failure:.... A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Presumably it was years ago that they recovered the engines. Was there a market for Tyne aero engines at that time? Aren't there also a lot of Tyne industrial / marine engines around? (as to your actual question - I don't know).
                        Last edited by HP111; 30th September 2014, 09:03.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Breguet Atlantic and Transall c-160 both use Tynes.

                          M

                          Comment


                            #14
                            The Vanguard and Belfast used Tynes of a similar kind and spares were interchangeable

                            The Tynes of the Atlantique, CL-44 and Transall are of a different kind and are no use spares wise for the above two types.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              So swap the complete engine then.
                              The mind once expanded by a new idea never returns to its original size.

                              Comment


                                #16
                                And then there was one....

                                I received news today that Short SC-5 Belfast C1, XR365, [G-HLFT, RP-C8020] is to be cut up at Cairns airport tomorrow, 28-2-17
                                From Facebook

                                Moggy
                                "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

                                Comment


                                  #17
                                  ...or put another way, a 10% survival rate. Better than some (to try and put a positive spin on a cr@ppy piece of news).

                                  Comment


                                    #18
                                    Sad news, but inevitable in a way. And she's had a good run I'd say.
                                    A Little VC10derness - A Tribute to the Vickers VC10 - www.VC10.net

                                    Comment


                                      #19
                                      Yes it's very sad news indeed. I was genuinely concerned for its future beyond its service career even when it left these shores as a flyer many years ago.

                                      In my opinion we should never be down to a single example of any aircraft type in preservation, it's just too risky, but as I'm not in a position to effectively alter that (as regards the Belfast anyway) then I have to be grateful for the one example that we do have!


                                      Rob
                                      Facebook page
                                      https://www.facebook.com/Westland.Wy...tif_t=page_fan

                                      Comment


                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by Wyvernfan View Post
                                        In my opinion we should never be down to a single example of any aircraft type in preservation, it's just too risky,
                                        Well, it all comes down to having enough money I suppose.

                                        But indeed, there are genuine risks.

                                        For example, see this photo page of the victims of the 1990 Le Bourget Dugny museum storage area fire:
                                        http://www.pyperpote.tonsite.biz/pag...i_1990pag.html
                                        http://www.airnieuws.nl updated per 11 SEPT 2018. Fokker aircraft and more...

                                        Comment


                                         

                                        Working...
                                        X