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Westland Wyvern Project Thread.

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  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Thanks for the comments.

    Adrian - indeed it didnt, hence why the newer one piece windscreen was introduced during the S.4 upgrade starting in 1955. This new design had a flat bullet proof screen aided by a windscreen wiper and incorporating the use of de-icer. The canopy was similarly upgraded but thats another story.

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  • adrian_gray
    replied
    That is a really startling curve - I can't imagine that helped visibility.

    Adrian

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  • No.2 A.A.C.U.
    replied
    Rob it looks great and a nice display at Newark.

    Tim

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  • ollieholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by Tony C View Post
    Looks great, you just need to find the 17' that goes in front, the 21' the sits behind plus the 20 odd feet either side and the jobs a goodun!
    I mentioned exactly the same thing at cockpitfest.

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  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Indeed. Im always open to donations of said missing sections.

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  • Tony C
    replied
    Looks great, you just need to find the 17' that goes in front, the 21' the sits behind plus the 20 odd feet either side and the jobs a goodun!

    Leave a comment:


  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Sturgeon - As mentioned before, after seven years of ownership the Sturgeon project has been sold to a new owner who Im sure will take it onto the next stage. With the larger parts coming from as far apart as near Perth, North Yorkshire, Oxfordshire and Kent it has been a real journey of discovery to get it this far, but now I wish the new owner the best of luck with what is a fantastic and unique project.

    Wyvern - After many years of searching / hoping that a curved front screen section would turn up on someones allotment or shed (which it didnt) I finally got round to making one. I decided on using polycarbonate as its much easier to form and cut than Perspex - the down side is that it scratches much easier too. This has transformed the aerodynamic appearance of the windscreen and gives a much better idea of a complete earlier type screen.

    The API also now has its accompanying outside temp gauge fitted. This would of sat very close to the pilots left leg, hence the shape of the bracket on the right side.
    Attached Files

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  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Yes an interesting survivor which appears to be the extreme front hinged section. A shame all the Perspex appears to be missing.
    Thanks to all those for the heads up.



    Rob

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  • Spiteful
    replied
    Hi, have you seen this piece of Sturgeon up for auction? https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/a...0-a9a800eddd95

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  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Thanks Mike. I hope it inspires others like me with virtually no engineering background to at least have a go.



    Rob

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  • Versuch
    replied
    Absolute credit to you Rob.

    Cheers Mike

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  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Thanks Ben.



    Rob

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  • TEXANTOMCAT
    replied
    That is absolutely superb! Well done!

    TT

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  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Its been a while since my last update, but the Wyvern rig has now swapped its bare metal appearance for a new 1950s FAA colour scheme of Sky and Extra dark sea grey on its cockpit sides. And we are very honoured to of been invited to attend the Ford Airfield Centenary Exhibition at the Yapton & Ford village hall and playing field (postcode BN18 0EY) in East Sussex on the 9th June between 11.00am and 4.00pm.

    As some of you will already know - RNAS Ford, HMS Peregrine or RAF Ford as it was also known has a very rich and varied history, and this exhibition which is being organised by the Yapton & Ford Local History Group will include various displays and talks to help educate and celebrate this. Everybody welcome to attend.

    The airfield was also of course the spiritual home of the Westland Wyvern in FAA service between 1953 - 58.


    Rob
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Wyvernfan; 31st May 2018, 07:28.

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  • davidq
    replied
    Once again thank you both, especially you Rob for going the extra mile with the photo. I can now use some genuine material instead of an old shirt remnant that was planned.

    Dave.

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  • Fouga23
    replied
    Yup, that's the stuff

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  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Dave, I had chance to take a closer look at the canopy today. I think Fouga could be right regarding the material used for the strengthening strips, although it feels more like a fabric which has a slightly rough feel rather than completely smooth, and these were attached to the inside of the canopy and not sandwiched between two layers as first thought.

    For reference the material is around 1 to 1.5 mm in thickness and is 3" in diameter. Hope that helps!


    RobClick image for larger version

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  • davidq
    replied
    Thank you both for the replies, gives me something to think about. The ejector seat theory didn't occur to me at all. Rob your comment that the canopy would need to be broken to access the material is interesting I was assuming it was just bonded to the inside. In his book "Up in Harms Way" the writer of the Wyvern's Pilots Notes Mike Crosley mentions a double thickness hood so that ties in.
    Yes another Wyvern mystery there have been many in this build, with a Spitfire even an individual rivets position can be sourced but the Wyvern is a shadowy figure in comparison. At 1/5 scale a presentable solution will be found although it's always nice to know how the maker of the full size did it.

    Dave.

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  • Fouga23
    replied
    From experience with canopies like those on the F-84, it is indeed a fibreglass material.

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  • Wyvernfan
    replied
    Hi Dave, hmm bit of a tricky one that as unless the canopy is broken it's difficult to ascertain exactly what the material is. But when I'm over my store next I'll take a closer look.

    The later design of canopy does have a white outline marking the edge of the 'straight through ejection' Perspex - which could be some form of easy break material so the canopy doesn't provide too much resistance to the ejection seat, but as I don't know of any of this type of canopy surviving I can't say for sure if it's the same material.

    Sorry to sound so vague but this type of later canopy has always remained a bit of a mystery to me!



    RobClick image for larger version

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