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Article about Townsend Griffiss USAAF

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  • dairwin
    Rank 5 Registered User

    Article about Townsend Griffiss USAAF

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17011105

    DAI
  • Moggy C
    Moderator

    #2
    What a tragedy.

    Moggy
    "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

    Comment

    • paulmcmillan
      Rank 5 Registered User

      #3
      To complete story and provide full list of all on board


      Consolidated Liberator 1 G-AGDR (AM918) of BOAC was shot down off the Eddystone Lighthouse, by a two Spitfires of 317 Sqn at 8:50 am 15th Feb 1942


      Crew

      Captain Robert Humphrey Page (first pilot)
      Captain John Alexander Stuart Hunter (second pilot)
      First Officer Richard John Williamson
      Engineer Officer Horace Reginald John Spicer
      Radio Officer Hubert France Parker.

      Passengers


      Brigadier Frederick Morris CB MC ROAC
      Lt Col Townsend Griffiss USAAC # O-015010
      Lt Charles Oliver Mansfield Vine RNR
      Harold Edward Bell (RR representative)
      Last edited by paulmcmillan; 14th February 2012, 09:04.
      Weather - Fair with cloudy patches, clear by early evening.

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      • Slipstream
        Rank 5 Registered User

        #4
        I believe that Rome Army Airfield in NY state was renamed after him, Griffiss AFB.
        Insolentis Senectus Volatica

        Comment

        • Scouse
          Rank 5 Registered User

          #5
          First USAAF casualty of WW2 in Europe

          Fascinating piece on the BBC website, and a timely reminder that all armed forces have 'friendly fire' incidents hidden in their cupboards.

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17011105

          Comment

          • dairwin
            Rank 5 Registered User

            #6
            Originally posted by Scouse View Post
            Fascinating piece on the BBC website, and a timely reminder that all armed forces have 'friendly fire' incidents hidden in their cupboards.

            http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17011105
            This is the article I started this thread with

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            • Moggy C
              Moderator

              #7
              I merged that posting into this thread. It was originally a duplicate.

              Moggy
              Moderator
              "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

              Comment

              • pogno
                Rank 5 Registered User

                #8
                It seems to me to have been unfair to solely blame the Polish pilots for this, the decision by Captain Page to use a different route was a mojor factor which put them potentially in danger of being shot down by enemy aircraft, and then his approach from a different direction contributed to the Poles thinking it was a hostile aircraft.

                Richard
                "Where are you from?"
                "America" Somebody laughed politely.

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                • Moggy C
                  Moderator

                  #9
                  Maybe so, but they really hadn't been paying attention in Aircraft Recognition class had they?

                  A high wing, compound tail, multi mistaken for a low wing, single tail Condor?

                  They saw what they wanted to see I'm afraid.

                  But we can't be too hard on them at this distance. These things do happen in wartime.

                  Moggy
                  "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

                  Comment

                  • J Boyle
                    With malice towards none

                    #10
                    Originally posted by Slipstream View Post
                    I believe that Rome Army Airfield in NY state was renamed after him, Griffiss AFB.
                    Early in my Air Force career, I worked in the Public Affairs office. I knew he was the first USAAF casuality in Europe, didn't now anything about RAF involvment. When asked about the base' namesake, we'd reply he lost lost in a Liberator.
                    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

                    Comment

                    • PanzerJohn
                      Rank 5 Registered User

                      #11
                      A piece in the Mail..

                      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ld-War-II.html

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