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    Indonesian Aircraft Museum - Yogyakarta

    Was recently in Yogyakarta visiting the in-laws, and got the chance to visit the little known aircraft museum there, Museum Dirgantara Mandala. This is located on the Indonesian Air Force Base at Adi Sucipto International Airport.

    Depending on which way you land, you can see the TU-16 Badger under its cover, and I've always meant to go, but never managed - well I did this time.

    The museum is a surprising little gem, considering it probably has a minimum budget. There is a large hall with various uniforms throught the history of the Indonesian AF, and other various displays.

    Most of the airframes are in good condition, although some do not seem to be restored internally - I've included some of these photos that I managed to take.

    All apart from the A4 Skyhawk are under cover, although the Catalina has broken glazing, especially the stbd gondola, and is open to birds. The TU16 has damage to its glazing too, and one of the missiles has slight graffiti on it. I think close proximity to the AF Base school has not helped some of the airframes.

    There is also a collection of radars and missile systems in the main display hall, but I didn't have the time I would have liked to photo everything, given I had the other half and in-laws in tow!

    I wasn't using a tripod, and the light inside and outside was hard to get decent photos, but I hope you all enjoy the following. If anybody wants to see bigger versions of the photos, let me know, and I can send. The quality of the photos uploaded here has been reduced for uploading.

    4 posts worth of images follow this one - hope you all enjoy!

    All the best,

    Scotty
    Attached Files
    Last edited by WL747; 6th June 2010, 18:20.
    "I've never killed a man, but I've read many obituaries with a great deal of satisfaction" - Mark Twain

    #2
    Indonesian Aircraft Museum Part 2

    Some more images - note the damaged Catalina glazing.

    It was possible to get into the Dak, the cockpit was just as it was when it was retired, with the Engineers station, Radio Op station and the Pilot's Station - the smell of a working aircraft was still there!
    Attached Files
    "I've never killed a man, but I've read many obituaries with a great deal of satisfaction" - Mark Twain

    Comment


      #3
      Indonesian Aircraft Museum - Yogyakarta Part 3

      Some more images...

      Quite sad seeing the internals of the Hillier 360 damaged, but at least the airframe is safely indoors....

      .... to be continued
      Attached Files
      "I've never killed a man, but I've read many obituaries with a great deal of satisfaction" - Mark Twain

      Comment


        #4
        Indonesian Aircraft Museum - Yogyakarta Part 4

        Some more photos.

        The Mil 4 looked a bit stripped internally, but the airframe was in good condition....

        .... to be continued
        Attached Files
        "I've never killed a man, but I've read many obituaries with a great deal of satisfaction" - Mark Twain

        Comment


          #5
          Indoneisian Aircraft Museum - Yogyakarta - Part 5

          Some more of the Badger and some others, including a Zero...

          The rear fuselage of the 'crashed' Dak is a replica of a Dak VT-CLA that was shot down by the Dutch Airforce just outside Yogyakarta on the 29th July 1947. This aircraft was trying to take in medical supplies and relief aid from Singapore into Yogyakarta during the armed struggle to obtain full independence from the Dutch. The aircraft was owned by the State Government of Orissa in India. I think the replica is actually fuselage of a scrapped Dak. I have seen a list that says there is a 2nd Dak at the museum, but not seen it - unless it is somewhere else on the base....

          There is a diorama and models of the Dak getting shot down by the Dutch Kittyhawks, including piles of cotton wool representing smoke coming out of the Dak in the museum, but was behind glass and in poor light, so I did not get a decent photo due to reflections on the glass.

          5 out of the 6 on the Dak were killed, the pilot giving his name to Yokyakarta's international airport, which was previously known as Maguwo Landing Ground.

          Hope you have enjoyed the photos!

          Scotty
          Attached Files
          Last edited by WL747; 6th June 2010, 19:30. Reason: VT-CLA addition
          "I've never killed a man, but I've read many obituaries with a great deal of satisfaction" - Mark Twain

          Comment


            #6
            nice pics... thanks for sharing
            coke cans a bottle tops

            Comment


              #7
              Excellent photo report - thanks for putting these on the Forum - interesting insight into a rarely mentioned collection.
              "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."(Mary Baker Eddy)

              Comment


                #8
                Nice pictures, thanks for sharing! Overall the aircraft appear cared for. I have trouble seeing the damaged glazing on the Cat though?
                Cheers,Peter
                "Merlins always drip oil, when they don't....worry!"

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Peter View Post
                  Nice pictures, thanks for sharing! Overall the aircraft appear cared for. I have trouble seeing the damaged glazing on the Cat though?
                  If you look at Catalina 0453, you can clearly see 2 holes in the nose glazing, and Catalina 0455 shows glazing missing from the stbd cupola. If you can't see, I can post the original if you wish....

                  The aircraft were clean, and were cared for - no signs of dripping oil! As to how much preservation has been doneor what ongoing conservation is happening is anybodies guess - apart from the aircraft description plates, all other displays were entirely in Indonesian, and my language skills are not at a high enough level yet to fully grasp.

                  At least I can order food and beer....

                  Kind Regards,
                  Scotty
                  "I've never killed a man, but I've read many obituaries with a great deal of satisfaction" - Mark Twain

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thankyou for showing us this excellent collection, well worth the visit and makes me regret not making the time to go and visit last time I had a stop over in Jakarta.They have a B25 and A26 but no B24 and only 1 Japanese item is that correct?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Cracking pics of a fine collection, you don't automatically think of the Indonesians being interested in their aviation past, but from what I see above they clearly do!
                      Thanks for sharing, and if you get to see them Gannets...
                      http://www.abpic.co.uk/search.php?q=...t=most_popular

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by SMS88 View Post
                        Thankyou for showing us this excellent collection, well worth the visit and makes me regret not making the time to go and visit last time I had a stop over in Jakarta.They have a B25 and A26 but no B24 and only 1 Japanese item is that correct?
                        I cannot comment on the Jakarta aviation museum, as I have never been - I've just passed through Jakarta. I don't think they will have a B24, as I am pretty sure the Indonesian AF never operated them. The Japanese types they have were captured after WWII.

                        Yogyakarta isn't a place to really stop over en-route to somewhere else - it tends to be a destination for those wanting to see the largest Buddist temple in SE Asia (Borobudur) and the Hindu temple complex at Prambanan - both World Heritage sites. I only go there, as that is where the other half is from.

                        It is interesting to see how much they look after the aircraft, bearing in mind Indonesia isn't too far away from being a third world country....
                        "I've never killed a man, but I've read many obituaries with a great deal of satisfaction" - Mark Twain

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by pagen01 View Post
                          Cracking pics of a fine collection, you don't automatically think of the Indonesians being interested in their aviation past, but from what I see above they clearly do!
                          Thanks for sharing, and if you get to see them Gannets...
                          We'll see - I don't have much reason for going to Surabaya, and I'm not going just to see a Gannet! Now if it was a Shack.....

                          The other half is starting a contract in Korea, so it is going to be some time before I am back in Java, but I'll bear it in mind James...

                          Kind Regards,
                          Scotty
                          "I've never killed a man, but I've read many obituaries with a great deal of satisfaction" - Mark Twain

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Thanks for posting - interesting collection.

                            Roger Smith.
                            A Blenheim, Beaufighter and Beaufort - together in one Museum. Who'd have thought that possible in 1967?

                            Comment


                             

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