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    #21
    Originally posted by Plane Space View Post
    The bigger the better in every aspect!:diablo:
    Ooooo, Matron

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      #22
      Cool.
      Excellence is not a skill. It is an attitude.


      http://planemadanna.blogspot.co.uk/


      The first quality needed is audacity

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        #23
        Stanley Matthews' autobigraphy. Football was so different when he began playing in the Thirties. Many players at any given club were local working class lads who continued to live in the same kind of streets as the fans. The maximum wage was still in force. The England team had no manager, just a panel of selectors and all nearly all travel, both domestic and continental, was done by train. Also interesting to read what he thought about the infamous Nazi salute.
        Terms & Conditions Apply.

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          #24


          Any cat-owners will instantly relate to the escapades of Norton, the Scottish Fold kitten - a proper fun read!
          Daren Cogdon

          Spitfire fanatic

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            #25
            Recently finished 'Flying Through Midnight' by John Halliday
            He flew secret missions in C 123's in LAOS with the navigator using an early NVG device 'starscope' to target the Red supply route at night.
            Fascinating book - the 2nd half really was unputdownable.

            http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/offer-lis...0068551&sr=1-2

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              #26
              Ultimate Spitfires by Peter Caygill.
              Excellence is not a skill. It is an attitude.


              http://planemadanna.blogspot.co.uk/


              The first quality needed is audacity

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                #27
                A nice 750 page spec. on how to develop armour (That is light enough to fly) to overmatch the weapons of tomorrow.
                It's like juggling treacle whilst drinking soot with pebbles in it.

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                  #28
                  I'm reading Toujours Provence by Peter Mayle...

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                    #29
                    Very good it is too. The writer does seem to be rather in love with her subjects though, she even writes them a poem. Which is bloody awful frankly.
                    Attached Files
                    Hptm Dietrich Puttfarken II./KG 51

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                      #30
                      Just completed Drew, John G. et al; Unmanned Aerial Vehicle End-to-End Support Considerations; RAND Corporation; Santa Monica, CA; 2005

                      Currently, in progress:
                      • Yenne, Bill; Seaplanes & Flying Boats; BCL Press; New York; 1997
                      • Winchester, Jim; THE AVIATION FACTFILE - CONCEPT AIRCRAFT, PROTOTYPES, X-PLANES, AND EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT; THUNDER BAY PRESS; San Diego, CA; 2005

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                        #31
                        I just finished...Go like Hell..the story of the Ford-Ferrari war at Le Mans in the late 60s.
                        Excellently written, reads like a well-done magazine article, in other words, not too technical for those who don't follow motorsport.

                        Now I just strarted re-reading Fate is the Hunter by Ernest K. Gann.
                        I haven't read it for several years. Always a treat.
                        There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

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                          #32
                          Spitfire by Leo McKinstry. Really destroys a few of the myths about this type.
                          The mind once expanded by a new idea never returns to its original size.

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                            #33
                            "The Lockheed Papers"by David Boulton, if you want corruption this books got it in Bucket fulls.

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                              #34
                              Guildford Remember When by David Rose & Bernard Parke.
                              Excellence is not a skill. It is an attitude.


                              http://planemadanna.blogspot.co.uk/


                              The first quality needed is audacity

                              Comment


                                #35
                                William Boyd

                                A very good author.This book was called"Restless" a young lady finds out her mother was a spy during the war and wants help finding her old boss! I wont say any more but its a cracking good read.

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                                  #36
                                  Jet Jockeys by Peter Caygill - Deals with the introduction of a variety of jets into the RAF in the 50's and 60's. i.e Meteor,Vampire,Venon,Sabre,Swift, Hunter and Javelin. Once again a trip down memory lane to those involved in those days.
                                  Peter

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                                    #37
                                    Going to get "the blue skies of autum".

                                    A biogrpahy of a women, whos husband died in 9/11 (RIP all), got on with life after her husbands death. Read a bit in the Sunday times and was immedatley hucked. Getting it this week.
                                    NICK

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                                      #38
                                      All Men Are Mortal by Simone de Beauvoir
                                      Excellence is not a skill. It is an attitude.


                                      http://planemadanna.blogspot.co.uk/


                                      The first quality needed is audacity

                                      Comment


                                        #39
                                        Currently reading Mark Haddon's "Spot of Bother", after reading "A curious incident of a dog in the night time". Almost finished it, though I enjoyed a curious incident a lot more.
                                        Aviation Jobs at CAA Careers

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                                          #40
                                          Originally posted by rosszero View Post
                                          "A curious incident of a dog in the night time".
                                          That was a very strange yet fascinating book; still remember that part where the lad is stuck on the Tube platform for hours because he doesn't know what to do.

                                          Just finishing "Cleese Encounters" Never realised just what a diverse and complicated man he is, but I'm still not sure about all that Psycotherapy pallava. Nor did I realise how embarrassed he is by some of the Python stuff now, especially the silly walk.

                                          Just remembered, it was him that gave me that "Waffer-thin mint" too, wasn't it?
                                          Last edited by Mr Creosote; 27th August 2009, 10:26.
                                          Terms & Conditions Apply.

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