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Co-incidence or, something else ?

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  • John Green
    Rank 5 Registered User

    Co-incidence or, something else ?

    As a member of the LAA, I receive Aviation, the monthly LAA publication. It's tells many stories including describing the efforts of members who take on part finished projects as well as starting new.

    One such, has just completed the build of a well known kit that had previously been worked upon. He has been a pilot for a number of years and his late sister was equally enthusiastic and accompanied him on many of his excursions.

    On completion of his project he checked the registration details with the CAA and noted that it had already been registered as G-ZENA.

    His sister's name is Ena.
  • David Thompson
    Rank 5 Registered User

    #2
    The aeroplane is based at Fishburn Airfield near Sedgefield in County Durham and I am lucky enough to have seen it a couple of times but it has yet to fly . From what I understand the project has had something of a chequered history which is borne out by it's unusual colour scheme . You will just have to wait and see !

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    • John Green
      Rank 5 Registered User

      #3
      Similar to the above:

      I'm reading "The Summer of '45", by Kevin Telfer which is an account of the world wide re-action and events immediately after VE and VJ days. Describing the aftermath of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Mr. Telfer refers to the role of the B29, 'Enola Gay' and its pilot Col. Paul Tibbets, a story with which most of us are familiar.

      The author describes the visual impact of the explosions. The boiling mass of cloud and debris flung into the sky; the shock wave felt by the B29 and so on.

      The B29 Enola Gay was named after Tibbets' mother, who in turn was named after a character in a book written by Mary Ridenbaugh called 'Enola; or, Her Fatal Mistake'. The book is introduced with a poem:

      "Oh fatal day - Oh day of sorrow,
      It was no trouble, she could borrow,
      But in the future she could see,
      The clouds of infelicity".
      Last edited by John Green; 13th November 2017, 10:13.

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      • Moggy C
        Moderator

        #4
        Originally posted by David Thompson
        but it has yet to fly
        As of early November it has logged ten hours airborne.

        Moggy
        "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

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        • David Thompson
          Rank 5 Registered User

          #5
          Mmmmmm...I'm up at the field tomorrow so will try and find Eric and ask him .
          Nothing in the airfield log !

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