Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

26y old hoping for a career in aviation, seeking advice

Collapse
X
Collapse
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • Salomanuel
    Rank 4 Registered User
    • Jan 2014
    • 3

    26y old hoping for a career in aviation, seeking advice

    Hi, I'm 26 years old, I'm from Italy and I'm entering a mayor life crisis.
    I've always loved planes. When I was 18 I've tried to enter the Italian Airforce but I've been rejected a couple of times in the latest stages of the recruiting for "strange reasons".
    But I prefer slower planes and I don't think I would have liked the military life.
    After that I've done some years at the University, but I don't think I'm suited for that, at least not for the Italian way. Now I don't have any degree, I have just a few exams left but I'm really slowing down and every new day I wake up thinking that I'm not living my life, it seems like I'm living someone else's.
    Besides that, I "lose" a lot of time playing Flight Simulator, reading manuals of MD-80s and 737-800s and watching documentaries about planes. When I see a plane I try to guess which SID is flying.

    Since I'm in a phase of my life in which I really have to decide what to do in the future, I wanted to ask you what I could do in the aeronautical world.
    Obviously my huge dream is to be a pilot, but I fear that's an utopia sp I'm also willing to do something else. The other day I was looking for a job as an ATC in Belgium, the day before I was looking for a job as a steward in Ryanair (and it seems a rip off).
    I wanted to ask you if is really THAT utopian to work as a pilot and if it is, which alternative careers I could go for.
    I know, now it's a very bad time, I'm not young (I'm 26). I don't have huge piles of money, but if it's really worth it I could ask somewhere for some help.
    I'm not looking for a high wage (I think that for me the joy is about flying, not counting the money), but I wish I could afford to live on my own with this job.
    My English is not that good, but as I never speak it, it has good room for improvements. I'm willing to live almost anywhere and I wish to have a stable work, but frankly I stand on awe even watching videos of Mexican pilots landing between mountains with twin engined props.

    Sorry for the outburst.
  • John Green
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Mar 2011
    • 6643

    #2
    Salomanuel

    On behalf of all the other Forum members, welcome. You've arrived on an excellent Forum whose members are knowledgeable with their advice anf generous with their time and encouragement. I don't envy you. A long time friend has just obtained his captaincy with Jet2 and I'm very much aware of the hoops he has jumped thru' and the money he has had to borrow to get to where he is.

    He had and has one outstanding personal characteristic. He is determined and single minded to the point of disbelief. When he was building hours I flew with him all over the place. He always knew what he wanted to do with his life and went about it entirely focused.

    It is the only way. Start with a private ( non commercial ) licence. Find someone - preferably with an a/c and offer to share costs. Once you have this and have gained a few hours get an instructors ticket. Now you can be paid and continue to build hours. Keep your goal in mind at all times and do not let yourself be diverted eg. girls, sport, clubbing etc.

    Good luck.

    Comment

    • TonyT
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Oct 2006
      • 9023

      #3
      I would also register and ask here

      http://www.pprune.org/professional-p...nd-studies-14/

      Welcome to the forums

      Comment

      • Mr Merry
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Jan 2013
        • 919

        #4
        Salomanuel, welcome to the forum.

        If you want a job in ATC or as a pilot you have to be fluent in English.

        At 26 the world is your oyster. What do you really want to do? Work that out and you can do what you want.
        You only have one chance in this world, go for what you want. If it donesn't happen then so be it. But try any way.

        Comment

        • Salomanuel
          Rank 4 Registered User
          • Jan 2014
          • 3

          #5
          first, thanks for the kind and warm answers
          I'm trying to summarize all the information I'm gathering
          I'm quite scared because I don't have a plan-B in case the pilot career doesn't work out (and that seems to happen a lot, for what I'm reading)

          I have some questions:
          How does it work the "instructor ticket"? I need just the CPL license to do it?
          How is the job offer? Can I find some work with just the CPL license? Or I will need ratings like the MEP and the IR? I'm willing to work anywhere.
          If I have to ask money to my family I want to know how much it will be till I can gain something to (slowly) pay the next expenses and ratings.

          I was looking for the prices and I found this link
          http://www.flyjaa.com/pilot-license-costs/
          It says:
          EASA PPL C152 € 9499
          CPL MEP PA28 € 8545
          Why the CPL is cheaper than the PPL? And How it can be MEP in the single engined PA28?


          I'm sorry if I'm bothering you with stupid questions, but I want to understand properly.

          Comment

          • Moggy C
            Moderator
            • Jan 2000
            • 20534

            #6
            Originally posted by Salomanuel View Post
            I was looking for the prices and I found this link
            http://www.flyjaa.com/pilot-license-costs/
            It says:


            Why the CPL is cheaper than the PPL? And How it can be MEP in the single engined PA28?
            The best plan would be to ask them, but I would suggest that the CPL cost has to be added to the PPL cost - in other words you do the PPL first and then the CPL so 18,000 Euro total.

            Much of the CPL training will be done on the cheaper PA28 with only the hours needed for the MEP rating done on a twin.

            Good luck and welcome

            Moggy
            "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

            Comment

            • 27vet
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Nov 2009
              • 2698

              #7
              Finish your degree too because tertiary education is an advantage when going for an airline interview.
              sigpicHindsight is what you see from the tailgunner's position...

              Comment

              • Primate
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Jan 2000
                • 655

                #8
                Originally posted by 27vet View Post
                Finish your degree too because tertiary education is an advantage when going for an airline interview.
                This. Or I'd suggest you consider another education / degree if possible before commencing commercial flying training, especially if you can't stand the one you're currently working on. The airline industry can be relatively difficult, and many professional pilots seem to agree that getting a tertiary education is generally a smart thing to do for prospective airline pilots today. It's nice to have something to fall back on if things don't work out. Many pilots with airline jobs as well seem to be interested in MBA courses and such. I'm currently studying for a Master's degree while working part-time as a flight instructor. Right now I don't trust the industry enough to invest everything in it.

                Do you really want to work for low-cost carriers such as Ryanair, if that should prove to be your only option in the short-term after getting your CPL?

                Also, if flying in general is your thing - try gliders!

                Comment

                • 27vet
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Nov 2009
                  • 2698

                  #9
                  I have just returned to the cockpit after a 12 year break. During my 12 year break, tertiary education has been a major support factor. My own story will bore most to tears but if you really want to know it, pm me. I feel very sorry for young aspirant, self sponsored pilots. They are in a chicken and egg situation. Airlines want experience, but where do you get experience? Where did Neil Armstrong get his experience to land on the moon? Unless your dad is rich and you can fly 2000 hours pre-paid, you don't stand a snowball's hope in hell with a few exceptions. I still haven't come across the predicted pilot shortage. I hate the airlines' attitudes because they all expect experienced pilots to knock on their doors but do not want to contribute to aviation by sponsoring cadets. Same goes for insurance companies. So the bottom line is that only the most dogged, determined individuals get there. But it really helps to have other tertiary education to fall back on.
                  sigpicHindsight is what you see from the tailgunner's position...

                  Comment

                  • J Boyle
                    With malice towards none
                    • Oct 2004
                    • 9792

                    #10
                    The best of luck to you.
                    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

                    Comment

                    Unconfigured Ad Widget

                    Collapse

                     

                    Working...
                    X