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  • chornedsnorkack
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Jul 2005
    • 1108

    Allowed passenger alcohol level

    Reading the rules of flying, I see that not only is it a violation of regulations for any person to operate any aircraft while drunk - it also is a violation for any person to transport a drunk person by air.

    What is that supposed to mean?

    Alcohol is commonly served aboard. Some passengers get drunk and engage in air rage. They can be arrested and prosecuted - but so can passengers who engage in air rage while sober.

    The regulations seem to talk of transporting any person who is drunk.

    So... What exactly happens to a passenger who drinks too much and is unable to wake up and deplane?

    What happens to a passenger who, though visibly drunk, is capable of deplaning as usual and has given no offence? Has he or she committed any offence?

    The airplane captain does appear to have violated the regulations if, at any time during the trip, any passenger in the cabin has been drunk!
  • rdc1000
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Jan 2000
    • 1396

    #2
    Well if you take an example from a few years ago, a UK charter airline from Florida to the UK stopped at Charlotte, USA, and threw a family off, they were stranded in the departure lounge there for well over a week if I remember rightly.

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    • Michael_Mcr
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Aug 2005
      • 262

      #3
      I think you will find that for the purposes of such laws and regulations, a person becomes "Drunk" when their drinking affects their behaviour to such an extent that it affects other people.

      So - a person who has been drinking, but remains quiet or remains capable of getting themselves off the plane is not officially "drunk".

      Wheras - a person who is rowdy or totally incapable through drink would attract the attention of the Crew / Captain and at that point, the onus would be on the Crew / Captain to take such actions as are appropriate to meet the reqirements of the relevent regulations.

      Its like the Police - they dont charge people (pedestrians, not motorists )with "drinking" or even being "drunk".

      Its "drunk and disorderley" or "unfit / incapable through drink"

      If you can get yourself home, quietly, then an offence doesnt occur.

      Comment

      • steve rowell
        Expat Geordie
        • Apr 2003
        • 13281

        #4
        I don't think alcohol shoul be served at airports where bored and somtimes nervous people can over extend themselves. Served onboard an aircraft in controlled amounts is the best way to keep things in check
        Best Regards Steve

        Comment

        • Michael_Mcr
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Aug 2005
          • 262

          #5
          Originally posted by steve rowell
          I don't think alcohol shoul be served at airports where bored and somtimes nervous people can over extend themselves. Served onboard an aircraft in controlled amounts is the best way to keep things in check
          Such restrictions, although well meant, would have little effect - people who wanted to drink would just go to a local pub and check in later or bring drink into the airpost with them and consume it before going airside. An airport ban, in order to be effective, would of course have to include a ban on the sale of ALL alchohol within the grounds - that would, of course, include the duty-free shops !!

          Otherwise, whats to stop someone buying a cheap half-bottle of Vodka and knecking it in the airport toilets ?

          It is similar to the ludicrous restrictions on selling alchahol at petrol stations - it has been proven to be completely irrelevent to the curse of drink driving, which is what is was origonally intended to counter. All this legislation has done is blight rural communities where the petrol station often has the local mini-mart attached.

          As in so many things in life, it is education, not legislation, which works best.

          Comment

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