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Let's bring back the Stuntman

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  • TomcatViP
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Nov 2011
    • 6001

    #41
    Sourced from Scramble/Twitter

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DrbFGqrWkAEV9pG.jpg:large

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    • CONCORDE
      Rank 3 Registered User
      • Mar 2018
      • 15

      #42
      I think those days are gone from the barnstorming era of 1930's or 60's. Like any industry at the present recruiting new employees go through a wide range of tests to see if they are suitable. What you want is someone who is levelheaded and not a hot head, who can fly the aircraft safely and competent and yes just like Chesley Sullenberger.

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      • CONCORDE
        Rank 3 Registered User
        • Mar 2018
        • 15

        #43
        Possibly the best stunt work I seen was in the Airport 1980 film, when a stuntman ran underneath Concorde on take off.

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        • TomcatViP
          Rank 5 Registered User
          • Nov 2011
          • 6001

          #44
          Software will now deal with the daily routine of flight. Stratified ones will do even better (see earlier).
          When something will go wrong, it will potentially cascade into something catastrophic rapidly. It is then logically in the interest of the industry to see and recruit their pilots as a backup failure system that will react in an environment where the decision process has been compromised or did failed completely (unexpected case of failure, instruments failures, non-relevant checklist, communications unavailable...). The Pilot will have to react instantly and take decisive action right on the go. Pilots that master the core of their competencies only will have a chance of success: stick time, 3d awareness, crash procedure training, aerobatics basics (and understanding), flight time "by the pants" and obviously old fashioned navigation training will be at the forefront of what does constitute for modern airlines... an useful pilot.

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          • CONCORDE
            Rank 3 Registered User
            • Mar 2018
            • 15

            #45
            TomcatVIP

            Have to say this is an odd title for what you are trying to explain!!!!

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            • TomcatViP
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • Nov 2011
              • 6001

              #46
              It refers to the early age of aviation where every flight was a stunt (see 1st post of the thread)

              A pilot with a stuntman background... A one trained to land every time his plane in the Hudson river, glide a 242 tones aircraft for hundred of miles or recover from a spin at night in the most severe thunderstorm...

              Let's let the Engineer deal with the day to day routines of flight. Let's grd operator manage the flight routes, the schedules, the administrative tasks. Let's the airlines Manage the flow of passengers in front of the increase number of administrative and legal procedures. Let the Software deal with the expected, the attended, the known situations...

              And let the pilot be a flyer, unsophisticated, rough, Cocky if possible but the one that can handle the most serious, sever and unexpected situation. Yep , that one will certainly have to be alone in the "cockpit" for obvious economic reason (cost of training), but let's bring back the Stuntman!


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              • TomcatViP
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Nov 2011
                • 6001

                #47
                Last Ethiopian Boeing Max crash raised the question that this topic was aimed for more than 4 years ago:

                "Airlines don't teach pilots to fly. They teach procedures. Your basic core skills should be there before you get to the airline," said Bo Corby, director of standards and training for Future & Active Pilot Advisors, or FAPA, a career and financial advisory service.

                He said the focus for training many pilots these days is to teach them how to use the automated systems, deemphasizing basic flying skills. He said the time has come to revert to a system in which knowledge of core techniques becomes critical again.
                Source:
                USA Today.com
                Last edited by TomcatViP; 26th May 2019, 10:26.

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                • mrtotty
                  Rank 5 Registered User
                  • Mar 2008
                  • 1062

                  #48
                  I think the two need to go hand-in-hand throughout the training procedure. Over-reliance on automated systems is just starting to become an issue in the automotive world.

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                  • TomcatViP
                    Rank 5 Registered User
                    • Nov 2011
                    • 6001

                    #49
                    The idea was to relocate the system monitoring activities down to the ground (IA assisted) as most of the procedures and administrative tasks. Today (as was the example used on the opening post of this thread), a 20 something can operate a plane on the other side of the world through high bandwidth datalinks and IA; airframe that are way more tricky to fly and operate given the maximization of their performance and mission profile at minimal cost. There is no reason that a trained team of operators with the dedicated hardware and set of procedures can't do the same with an airliner routinely, leaving the unexpected events at the hands embarked professionals, selected and trained specifically (leaving the burden and time consuming tasks of learning the systems aside as a minor in their formation).

                    Please feel free to browse back the thread to find more in-depth details.

                    Last edited by TomcatViP; 9th June 2019, 21:50.

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