Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Article on heroic pilots shows lack of historical knowledge.

Collapse
X
Collapse
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • DavidIsby
    Rank 5 Registered User
    • Apr 2012
    • 586

    Article on heroic pilots shows lack of historical knowledge.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-9...ll-time-2014-8

    The absence of Captain Charles Martin of the Bermuda Sky Queen, among many others, shows a lack of historical research.
    It's not all on the Internet.
    sigpic author of THE DECISIVE DUEL: SPITFIRE vs 109
  • Moggy C
    Moderator
    • Jan 2000
    • 20534

    #2
    Moved to Commercial

    Moggy
    Moderator
    "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

    Comment

    • longshot
      Rank 5 Registered User
      • Aug 2008
      • 1666

      #3
      Well there's plenty more candidates for that list....the crew and supernumerary pilot on the Sioux Falls DC-10....Captain DW Phillips in VC-10 G-ASIX....the crew on the Continental 747 at Gatwick....the A330 glide to the Azores
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...nes_Flight_232
      http://www.british-caledonian.com/BC...e_Andes_1.html
      http://www.aaib.gov.uk/cms_resources...9%20N605PE.pdf
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Transat_Flight_236

      The female First Officer on the Aloha 243 deserves a mention, too
      http://www.tailstrike.com/Photos/Aloha%20243%202.JPG

      I think most of it is on the net, though :-)
      Last edited by longshot; 18th August 2014, 16:04.

      Comment

      • Mr Merry
        Rank 5 Registered User
        • Jan 2013
        • 919

        #4
        First time have read the G-ASIX story, Vickers built one strong plane.

        Comment

        • FLY.BUY
          Clear-Water-Islands
          • Jun 2004
          • 1302

          #5
          My favourite was Pan Am flight 843 on 28 June 1965, The Captain safely landed his Boeing 707 with 3 engines and half a right wing. Basically one of his engines and 25 foot of his wing fell off. Fully laden plane with fuel and 153 passengers on board. Takes some skill to put the bird down safely.

          Comment

          • Bager1968
            Rank 5 Registered User
            • May 2005
            • 3635

            #6
            Originally posted by FLY.BUY View Post
            My favourite was Pan Am flight 843 on 28 June 1965, The Captain safely landed his Boeing 707 with 3 engines and half a right wing. Basically one of his engines and 25 foot of his wing fell off. Fully laden plane with fuel and 153 passengers on board. Takes some skill to put the bird down safely.
            http://aviation-safety.net/database/...?id=19650628-0
            Crew: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 10
            Passengers: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 143
            Total: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 153

            Pan Am flight 843 experienced an explosive disintegration of the third stage turbine disk of the No. 4 engine. The accident occurred shortly after takeoff from San Francisco, at an altitude of about 800 feet above the ground.

            Disintegration of the turbine disk was followed by a fire in the No. 4 engine area and an explosion in the outboard reserve fuel tank. The No. 4 engine and approximately 25 feet of the right outer wing separated from the aircraft.

            The fire was extinguished and a successful emergency landing was accomplished at Travis Air Force Base, California, with no injuries to the 143 passengers or 10 crewmembers aboard the flight.


            Taken from rear of right wing. Outboard pylon can be seen under wing.
            Click image for larger version

Name:	19650628-0-C-d-1-750.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	102.0 KB
ID:	3656328
            Germany, Austria and Italy are standing together in the middle of the pub, when Serbia bumps into Austria, and spills Austria's pint.

            Comment

            • Bager1968
              Rank 5 Registered User
              • May 2005
              • 3635

              #7
              http://khon2.com/2014/05/09/aloha-ai...lew-off-plane/

              It’s been 26 years since the roof of Aloha Airlines Flight 243 ripped off. On Friday, one of the pilots who helped land the plane at Kahului Airport spoke about the experience.

              Click image for larger version

Name:	B737-200-Aloha-Hawaii.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	56.7 KB
ID:	3656329
              Mimi Tompkins was the flight’s co-pilot. At a safety conference, she described the moment a portion of the plane’s fuselage tore off.

              “I was flying the airplane, I was leveling off at 24,000 feet and then it felt like I had been kicked in the chest,” she said.

              Tompkins said all the training she went through kicked in that day.

              “Those 10 or 12 seconds my body continued to fly the airplane, but I don’t have much conscious memories of those seconds,” she said. “Then, when I did start to register what was going on around me, I heard my first flight instructor’s words, which were ‘Fly the airplane, fly the airplane.'”

              Tompkins gained international fame after a television movie, “Miracle Landing,” was made about the incident.
              Germany, Austria and Italy are standing together in the middle of the pub, when Serbia bumps into Austria, and spills Austria's pint.

              Comment

              • 27vet
                Rank 5 Registered User
                • Nov 2009
                • 2698

                #8
                TACA flight 110 even more heroic than US Airways flight 1549 but since it was not American and before the upsurge in sensationalism, very little recognition for the captain.
                sigpicHindsight is what you see from the tailgunner's position...

                Comment

                • Bmused55
                  Aaahh Emu!
                  • Oct 2003
                  • 11136

                  #9
                  I'm not sure the Qantas A380 is worthy of such a list.

                  Great job yes, but no real skill was involved in that nothing the flight crew (of 5!) did made a fatal situation survivable because the incident was not in any real danger of being fatal, unless the crew were hopelessly unable to fly a plane. It was just a spectacular engine failure on a plane with 4 engines.
                  Bmused55

                  Keep thy airspeed up, less the earth come from below and smite thee.

                  My Blog
                  My Designs

                  Comment

                  • garryrussell
                    Rank 5 Registered User
                    • Jun 2008
                    • 656

                    #10
                    The the TACA110 landing was far more skilled than the Hudson ditching and carries out by a pilot with one eye.

                    Another for the list was the BOAC Boeing 707 (G-ARWE) with an uncontained engine fire 1968? that turned back to LHR and landed on the crosswind runway with the airframe shedding parts as he made the turn.

                    Comment

                    Unconfigured Ad Widget

                    Collapse

                     

                    Working...
                    X