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Thread: 1940-1945 mixed aircraft pictures

  1. #1
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    1940-1945 mixed aircraft pictures

    Wanted to post a few pictures i happened upon. Most of the captions are from Life magazine, so if they don't make sense, don't flame ME.

    Squadron of US Douglas SBD-3 Dauntless dive bombers in flight, patrolling coral reefs off Midway Island searching for Japanese troops prior to the famous naval engagement.


    British RAF Beaufighter pilot stenciling additional swastika on aircraft to add to his tally of Luftwaffe planes shot down, WWII.


    Just what i wanted for Xmas.....
    The side of the crate is taken off revealing the Brewster fighter plane from America which is already camouflaged and painted RAF identification.


    This one made me spit out my tea....Way to go Johnny!
    Air Training Corps, the Spitfire starts blasting away and the Hun's engines catch fire.


    So this is how you won BoB?
    Air Training Corps, the Spitfire leader detaches himself from his squadron, "peels off" to attack the Hun.


    Lucky lads....
    (L-R) Pilot F. Wooton Gallager and crew, Alfred Young, Ronald Scott, Selwyn Fawcett, Charles Stewart, Kenneth Waddington & Murray Sherman with their Lancaster bomber which was forced to make an emergency landing after a bombing mission over Berlin.


    According to Life magazine, we are looking at:
    B-17's practicing flying tactics at the AAF School of Applied Tactics.

  2. #2
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    "According to Life magazine, we are looking at:
    B-17's practicing flying tactics at the AAF School of Applied Tactics."

    Ah, yes... I see they are operating over Paris.

  3. #3
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    Great shot of the Lancaster and crew. One of the better shots I've seen (as opposed to the amateur family photos we usually see..)
    Anyone know if the crew survived the war?


    And on a less serious note...

    It looks like the bike "peeling off" is actually a German bomber...note the twin engines on the wing...
    Last edited by J Boyle; 20th November 2008 at 16:47.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  4. #4
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    British RAF Beaufighter pilot stenciling additional swastika on aircraft to add to his tally of Luftwaffe planes shot down, WWII.
    Nearly fell off of my chair laughing at that one!
    I have made a ceaseless effort not to ridicule, not to bewail, not to scorn human actions, but to understand them.
    —Baruch Spinoza

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    Here's what I can tell you so far. It seems the crew were from 207 Squadron based at Spilsby. In 1944, which i believe this to be, the Squadron were operating both the Lancaster I and III.

    On the night of the 21/22 June 1944, Bomber Command sent 133 Lancasters and 6 Mosquitos to bomb a synthetic oil plant at Wesseling. Unable to use the low level marking system the target was bombed on H2S. Results were apparently poor. According to a local German report, 15 Germans, 5 foreign workers and a PoW were killed during the raid. Unfortunately, German night fighters managed to get into the bomber stream and consequently 37 Lancasters (some 28.7% of the Lancaster force) were lost.

    On that operation, Lancaster I ME827, coded EM-I, took off from Spilsby at 2332. The aircraft crashed onto Moestraatsebaan at Bergen op Zoom in Holland. Those killed are interred in the Canadian section of the local War Cemetery.

    The crew of ME827 were:

    F W Gallagher DSO.
    Sgt M B Millward.
    W/O A Young.
    Sgt R W Lloyd.
    F/S R P Scott.
    F/O P W Ball.
    Sgt K Waddington.
    F/S M Sherman RCAF.

    All were killed except for Warrant Officer Young who became PoW. 207 Squadron lost five aircraft that night. Of the 37 men of the Squadron who were lost that night, just three became PoW's, two evaded and the remainder were killed. Just for completeness, ME827 had been delivered to the Squadron on 29/5/44 and had 43 flying hours recorded at the time of the loss.

    Flight Sergeant Selwyn Fawcett had been lost on the night of 26/27 April in Lancaster III LM526 coded EM-R. The aircraft was on an operation to Schweinfurt when the aircraft crashed at Forbach. The entire crew were killed and all are buried in Durnbach War Cemetery. The aircraft had been delivered in April and just 24 flying hours before it's final operation. The crew were:

    F/L J F Muir.
    Sgt D A Loveday.
    P/O G Buxton.
    Sgt D N Collins.
    Sgt S Fawcett.
    Sgt W Upsall.
    Sgt G S Longmate.

    207 Squadron lost a second aircraft that night but six of the crew survived to become PoW's. The man lost was the M/U gunner, F/O R O Watts, RAAF. I've not yet found reference to a Charles Stewart nor can I find the incident in the photograph. However, obtaining the accident card for the aircraft might reveal more.

    As always, information courtesy of Chorley's BCL, Bomber Command War Diaries and Harry Holmes Avro Lancaster, the Definitive Record.

    Regards,

    kev35
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    Thats a very tight formation of US Navy Dountless. The pair of aircraft in the centre look only a few feet apart. Is the pilot of the lower of the two trying to keep out of the sun!

    Richard
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    "America" Somebody laughed politely.

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    Kev
    Thanks for the research.
    It's a sobering thought that five of the seven were lost.
    Bless them all..
    Last edited by J Boyle; 20th November 2008 at 23:00.
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    Something I've noticed on the photograph captioned "B-17's practicing flying tactics at the AAF School of Applied Tactics." is that at least the nearest of the Boston III's pictured is bearing an RAF serial which identifies it as one of a batch of lend-lease aircraft for the RAF. The nearest aircraft is one of a batch of 240 lend-lease aircraft, 40 of which were supplied to Russia. My eyesight is not good enough to tell whether the other aircraft are similarly marked.

    Regards,

    kev35
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    Quote Originally Posted by kev35 View Post
    Something I've noticed on the photograph captioned "B-17's practicing flying tactics at the AAF School of Applied Tactics." is that at least the nearest of the Boston III's pictured is bearing an RAF serial which identifies it as one of a batch of lend-lease aircraft for the RAF. The nearest aircraft is one of a batch of 240 lend-lease aircraft, 40 of which were supplied to Russia. My eyesight is not good enough to tell whether the other aircraft are similarly marked.

    Regards,

    kev35
    My eyesight's not good either but notice that the serial is repeated high up on the fin/rudder. The next aircraft in line has it's serial lower down in a more 'normal' USAAF position (and appears to have some form of badge on the rudder) but can't make out those beyond that one.

    Roger Smith.
    A Blenheim, Beaufighter and Beaufort - together in one Museum. Who'd have thought that possible in 1967?

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    The second aircraft is 12870.

    The third aircraft appears to have the same type serial as the first, while number four have the US type serial again.

    Here is a link to a full size image:

    http://images.google.com/hosted/life...91d30b9a378c7a

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    I don't know WHAT it is, but I don't think it's a Beau (although similar at a glance).
    James K

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDK View Post


    I don't know WHAT it is, but I don't think it's a Beau (although similar at a glance).
    I have to concur, the glazing ISN'T a Beau.
    Last edited by CIRCUS 6; 21st November 2008 at 12:57. Reason: Spelling!
    Shhhhhhh! It's the internet, no one cares. I hope the belligerent high post count tossers are listening...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mondariz View Post
    The second aircraft is 12870.

    The third aircraft appears to have the same type serial as the first, while number four have the US type serial again.

    Here is a link to a full size image:

    http://images.google.com/hosted/life...91d30b9a378c7a
    The marking on the rudder of the second aircraft - could it be a lion rampant East European/Russia style - although if you squint it could be a scrubbed-out swastika!!


    Roger Smith.
    A Blenheim, Beaufighter and Beaufort - together in one Museum. Who'd have thought that possible in 1967?

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    The photo of the swastica being painted on the side of an aircraft, is infact a Bristol Beaufighter Mk 1F Night Fighter, and the window is of that type, changed in later variants.
    G

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Boyle View Post
    It looks like the bike "peeling off" is actually a German bomber...note the twin engines on the wing...
    Oops, Battle of Barking Creek moment, John. Note the roundels.
    Quote Originally Posted by RPSmith View Post
    The marking on the rudder of the second aircraft - could it be a lion rampant East European/Russia style - although if you squint it could be a scrubbed-out swastika!!
    I think we are trying too hard on a grubby rudder.

    My hypothesis is that they're Douglas Bostons intended for the RAF, but taken over by the US in December 1941 (or shortly after) prior to delivery and before some were sent to Russia. (Thanks Kev.) Several clearly have RAF Boston camouflage with US starts over-painting the RAF roundel position.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wellington285 View Post
    The photo of the swastica being painted on the side of an aircraft, is infact a Bristol Beaufighter Mk 1F Night Fighter, and the window is of that type, changed in later variants.
    G
    Thanks, I think you are right, having tossed a bunch of books looking for a clear photo of that area. The IC is different to the IF. The remaining problem is if that's not a split angled windscreen, there's something wrong with the geometry, as the wing leading edge isn't parallel with the screen's base. Generally the RAF insisted on an armoured one piece screen for night fighters - was this a Bristol pre-approval version?

    Cheers,
    James K

    Looking and thinking...
    Vintage Aero Writer: Blog & Details

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