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Thread: IAF news-discussion October-December 2007

  1. #121
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    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/I...ow/2515767.cms

    CAn someone tell me what is added to the 1960's vintage propeller driven crap that they cost us $ 160 million a piece?? . Can't the Special forces just wait for MTA and get maybe 1 whole squardon for that price??

  2. #122
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    Air Attack.com

    C-130J Super Hercules

    Quick Links: News | Images | Videos | Specs | Sources | Bottom
    The latest C-130 to be produced, the C-130J entered the inventory in February 1999. With the noticeable difference of a six-bladed composite propeller coupled to a Rolls-Royce AE2100D3 turboprop engine, the C-130J brings substantial performance improvements over all previous models, and has allowed the introduction of the C-130J-30, a stretch version with a 15-foot fuselage extension.


    Designed specifically as a multi-role, multi-mission aircraft, the C-130J is equally at home for both tactical and a large range of strategic missions. Similar in appearance to earlier models of the Hercules, the C-130J is virtually an all-new aircraft. Major improvements include a state-of-the-art, computer-controlled digital flight deck.

    Cockpit
    The flightdeck features two head-up displays (HUDs), four large multi-function displays, five monochrome displays and fighter-style controls on the control columns. This glass cockpit technology also includes an automatic flight control system, autothrottle, head down display, traffic collision avoidance system, ground collision avoidance system and a stick pusher to prevent inadvertent aircraft stall. Integrated navigation equipment provides the pilots with an automatic navigation solution from the inertial navigation system and global positioning system as well as regular ground-based navigation aids.
    This increase in automated control has allowed the minimum crew to be reduced from five in the C-130H to just three (two pilots and a loadmaster) in the J, removing the requirement for a Flight Engineer and Navigator.

    Engines
    New, more powerful, digitally-controlled Rolls-Royce engines, fitted with Dowty Aerospace advanced technology six-bladed composite propellers, enable the C-130J to fly much further, faster and higher than previous models. The C-130J is also the world’s first military transport aircraft to have a head-up display certified as the primary flight instrument for all stages of flight.

    With proven military durability and reliability, the C-130J is at least 15% more fuel-efficient than previous models. In addition, improved technologies drastically reduce the requirements for maintenance and logistic support.
    The substantially lower through-life costs of owning and operating the C-130J make it the natural choice for any air force demanding an affordable multi-role transport capability.

    Operators
    Air forces currently operating the C-130J are the Royal Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, the Italian Air Force, the Royal Danish Air Force, the United States Air Force, the United States Air National Guard and Reserve, the United States Coast Guard and the United States Marine Corps.

    RAF
    The RAF, as lead customer for the new aircraft, has taken delivery of twenty-five C-130Js. The first was delivered to RAF Lyneham in November 1999. The last was delivered on 21st June 2001. Two variants were ordered: 10 standard C-130J aircraft; and 15 ‘stretched’ C-130J-30s. The latter are 180 inches longer and have an increased load carrying volume within a comfortable payload of over 40,000lbs. The RAF trains its C-130J crews in a purpose-built school house, which was also supplied by Lockheed Martin. This contains two full motion dynamic mission simulators. Since entering service, the RAF's C-130Js have been used in a variety of operational missions including action in the former Yugoslavia, Afghanistan and Iraq.

    British industry participation in the world-wide C-130J programme is substantial. The supply chain for C-130J regularly extends to some 150 UK companies, contributions to the programme being made from all sectors of the aerospace industry from SME’s to the largest multi-nationals. UK-owned companies provide over 20% of the value of each C-130J that rolls off the production line. The UK C-130J Industrial Participation programme has to date provided approximately £1billion of business to UK Aerospace and Defence contractors, supporting in excess of 18,000 man years of employment.

    Collectively, the UK industrial team is known as the UK C-130J Industrial Support Group and includes companies such as Rolls-Royce (engines), GKN Westland Aerospace (engine nacelles), Goodrich (digital engine controls) and Smiths Aerospace, including Dowty Propellers (power generation and distribution propellers). Over £740M in C-130J-related business has been placed directly with Lockheed Martin' s British industrial partners and suppliers to date. Further sales will increase this figure.

    Other air forces currently operating the C-130J are the Royal Australian Air Force, the Italian Air Force, the Royal Danish Air Force, the United States Air Force, the United States Air National Guard and Reserve, the United States Coast Guard and the United States Marine Corps. To date, 180 aircraft have been ordered and over 120 delivered. The market forecast for additional worldwide C-130J sales over the next 20 years is in excess of 300 aircraft.

    RAAF
    The Lockheed C-130J entered service with the Royal Australian Air Force in 1999, replacing the ageing C-30E fleet that had served since 1966. Operated by No. 37 Squadron at RAAF Richmond, approximately 50 kms north-west of Sydney, the C-130J is the most comprehensive update of the Hercules aircraft with a new two-crew flight compartment and turbo-prop engines that drive six-blade propellers. The RAAF currently operates 12 C-130J's.

    USAF
    In 2001, the US Air Force contracted Boeing to upgrade hundreds of its C-130E and C-130H aircraft under the Avionics Modernization Program (AMP). Besides upgrading the E and H versions, the Air Force planned to acquire up to 168 newer, more-capable C-130J Super Hercules aircraft to fill out the ranks of its tactical airlift inventory.
    Since then, however, the combat experiences of Afghanistan and Iraq have modified the Air Force's thinking, as have shifting budget priorities. The service now wants a smaller sized intra-theater cargo hauler, dubbed the Joint Cargo Aircraft (JCA), to support troops in austere forward areas as a complement to the Hercules fleet. It is working with the Army to acquire this aircraft jointly. Chief of Staff Gen. Michael Moseley said the Air Force could buy between 100 and 150 of them, according to Defense Daily. Additionally, the projected size of the C-130J fleet has shrunk to just 79 aircraft. This may grow somewhat, however, since the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) is beginning to express an interest in acquiring the aircraft instead of upgrading older C-130s, according to the senior officials.

    C-130J offered for Joint Cargo Aircraft (JCA)
    In June 2006, Lockheed Martin offered the short-fuselage variant of the C-130J for the Joint Cargo Aircraft Program.
    "Our C-130J solution meets or exceeds all JCA performance requirements and provides a solid cornerstone for the transformation of the Army’s fixed wing fleet,” said Rob Weiss, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics vice president for business development.

    Specifications & Performance problems
    In late July, 2004, the Pentagon's inspector general issued a 34-page report that substantiated the allegation that the C-130J aircraft does not meet contract specifications and therefore cannot perform its operational mission. Because the Air Force has already payed more than 99% of the aircraft's contracted delivery price, the Government fielded C-130J aircraft that cannot perform their intended mission, which forces the users to incur additional operations and maintenance costs to operate and maintain older C-130 mission-capable aircraft because the C-130J aircraft can be used only for training.

    The Pentagon plans to save more than $5 billion by ending the C-130J program in fiscal 2007 and scrapping the purchase of 63 aircraft that was planned through 2011. The FY 2006 budget proposed to end production of the Air Force's C-130J at 53, rather than the 168 originally projected. At $66.5 million, Secretary Rumsfeld said that the aircraft had become increasingly expensive to build and to maintain, especially given the ability to modernize existing C-130s. An Air Force report to Rumsfeld concluded that it would cost nearly as much to cancel the commercial contract - about $1.78 billion - as it would to complete it. That finding prompted Rumsfeld to reverse course, according to The Washington Post.
    In June 2006, it became apparent that Defense Secretary Rumsfeld relied on faulty data when he saved the C-130J Hercules from cancellation the year before. According to a report by the Pentagon inspector general a poorly written contract it to blame for the for keeping the transport plane alive. The new report said the Air Force may have overstated the cost of canceling the contract by as much as $1.1 billion, the Washington Post reported.
    The program has also been under scrutiny because the Air Force is buying the planes with a commercial contract, which does not require Lockheed to provide complete pricing and cost data, including its profit margin. Afterfacing criticism from Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), the Air Force said it would restructure the contract.Version C-130J
    Length 97.9 ft || 29.3 m
    Height 38.8 ft || 11.84 m
    Wingspan 132.6 ft || 40.41 m

  3. #123
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  4. #124
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    RE: C130J

    All well and good!

    But its still 640 crores per aircraft! What's it got that can't be done with cheaper airframes?

    Why isn't the IAF putting in locally made missile warning receivers. Aren't they good enough? What about the Tarang? If its good enough for the MKI its should be good enough for the hercs as an RWR.

    This deal doesn't make any sense at all. Its too expensive and it purchases one-off technologies which if sanctioned would ground the entire fleet and Rs. 4,000 crores! There is no mention of any commitment from the Americans that these supplies are not sanctionable.

    The total INITIAL COST of this is reported as around $ 1b which is Rs. 4,000 crores! Add lifecycle costs (spares, maintanence, infrastructure) and we are looking at roughly at - what - 6,000 crores in total?!

    Imagine that - the IAF wants to spend 6,000 crores on six aircraft! This is not US aid or a grant or a gift. It seems India has managed to negotiate TOP PRICE for the airframes. Where is the CAG when you need them? Where is the tender process? I haven't seen anything. When was it issued? Who responded? What were the competing bids?

    Write to or email your MP.
    Last edited by Shalav; 8th November 2007 at 18:03.

  5. #125
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    Thanks shalav. I hate to say this but I hope the commies scuttle this deal as well. For $ 1 bil we should be able to pick up 16-18 C-130 class a/c's why the hell does the IAF/IA need this junk?

  6. #126
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    The key part for me is the last part of the report on the C 130J I remember that even the US were not very happy with the C 130J and its extra costs, but since their was no replacement (viable) at the time i guess they stuck with it.

    It caused a lot of controvarsy
    Wrinkles wrinkles my kingdom fallen to a wrinkle

  7. #127
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    FROM FORCE

    ‘IAF will concentrate on getting more lethal, modern weapons platforms into its inventory’

    Chief of Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal F. H. Major PVSM, AVSM, SC, VM, ADC


    The IAF has celebrated its Platinum Jubilee. What are your thoughts on the occasion?

    The IAF has completed its 75th year of glorious service to the nation. From a small force with just four Wapiti aircraft in 1932 to becoming a professionally acclaimed, powerful, modern, strategic, fourth largest air force of the world is a stupendous climb. IAF is also probably one of the oldest air forces of the world. There are very few air forces that are older than the IAF. Where we are today is primarily due to the hard work and vision of our veterans; my predecessors also laid the foundation. It is our duty to follow this tradition and carry IAF forward.

    What, in your opinion, are the achievements of the IAF in these 75 years?

    Plenty of milestones have been crossed during the seven decades of existence. IAF has remained the guardian of Indian airspace − a battle-winner − and guarantor of India’s vital interests. In this journey, the IAF has operated diverse fleets of varying vintage and origin. IAF now has a mixed inventory of aircraft and equipment from all corners of the world. With home-grown tactics, IAF has executed numerous missions during peace and war, earning the gratitude of the Indian people; as well as international recognition for demonstrated professionalism in disaster relief operations, UN peacekeeping and international exercises. With the capabilities of our pilots, airmen and technicians, along with support from government agencies, we have always been successful. Over the last year, our operational preparedness remained at an all time high. Numerous tasks that stretched our resources were effectively completed. It was also among our safest years. Though a year is too short a time for technological transformation, progress is noticeable on all fronts.

    When we talk of mixed inventory for the IAF, it has also brought along several issues along with it. What are the issues and how will IAF be overcoming it?

    When I talk of mixed inventory, it must be stated that the issues relating to spares, maintenance and servicing are quite complex for such an inventory. Therefore, to reduce the complexities, the IAF will now concentrate on getting more lethal, modern weapons platforms into its inventory and have just about two or three types of aircraft in the inventory. To achieve this, the IAF has started phasing out old aircraft one-by-one, already. It is also in the process of carrying out a midlife upgrading of some of the aircraft. New acquisitions are in the process. While the three processes of phasing out, upgrading and acquiring newer platforms are on, there will be depletion in force levels. But we are not worried much. The lethality of the weapons platforms inventory and operational readiness of the existing fleet will keep IAF in good stead. We will certainly maintain an edge in the region.

    You have earlier said that the IAF will have lesser types of fighter aircraft in its fleet? Does that mean the IAF will be leaner in the days to come? When I said lesser types of fighters, I only meant the kind and quality of aircraft and not the quantity.

    You have said that the depletion in the force levels does not worry you much. But your predecessor has written to the government that the depleting squadron strength is a major concern. Is there a change in perception of the IAF on the depleting force levels?

    Well, when I said we are not worried, it did not mean we are not concerned. In fact, everybody in the country is concerned about the depleting squadron strength. But we are not unnecessarily worried. I would be, if there is no augmentation of the fleet strength. In fact, no air force in the world has ever maintained its force levels at all times. Replacing of old aircraft and induction of new ones is a continuous process. We are not purchasing a refrigerator here. It is a fighter aircraft. Every air force is going through this process today. What matters, however, is the home-grown tactics, doctrinal changes and thinking process. This will make IAF credible.

    What is the latest with regard to the upgrading of some of the aircraft in the IAF fleet? Has any timeframe been fixed for completing the upgrading of the platforms?

    In the upgrades programme, the IAF is getting excellent support from all government agencies. All of it would be completed in about five to 10 years. Already, one set of MiG-27s and the Jaguars have been upgraded. We are in the process of upgrading MiG-29s and more Jaguars. Negotiations are going on and the upgrading would be finalised by end of 2007. IAF also has plans to upgrade transport aircraft, helicopters and weapons systems. Before the Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MRCA) for which the Request for Proposals (RFP) were issued in August this year start flying in the IAF, we would have completed the upgrading of the fleet. There are programmes to even upgrade the skills of our pilots, airmen and technicians, as an able human resource too is vital, when new platforms and systems are inducted. The training programmes will be reviewed and changes introduced to keep the air warriors in tune with the times and to absorb new technologies. We are also seeking the cooperation of the academia and other government agencies to meet IAF’s organisational requirements.

    With regard to the IAF’s modernisation plan comprising acquisitions and upgrades of equipment and skills, do you think there is a `technology gap’ to bridge?

    I admit that there is a `technology gap’ between the IAF and the other modern, superhuman air forces of the world. The IAF is quite aware of the technological and maintenance challenges that lie ahead. We are in the process of filling up the gap through indigenisation and induction of imported platforms and systems from foreign vendors. IAF strongly believes that indigenisation of the platforms and weapons systems is a must and supports indigenous research and development. We are also working with friendly nations for mutual benefit. However, it has to be borne in mind that critical systems will not be given by other countries to us. It is mandatory for us to develop these critical systems indigenously. It is a slow process, but as years go by, we will be able to achieve a breakthrough. Take ‘stealth technology’ for example. We do not possess it as of now and so need to develop it indigenously, as nobody is going to give us the technology. So many more such technologies are required to be developed here. Electronic warfare technology is another such area, where there are gaps.

    Will the delay in an air force version of BrahMos affect the IAF’s plans?

    It is not going to affect the preparedness or the force structuring of the IAF much. The development and induction plan of BrahMos is an ongoing process. It may take a while, but it will happen as soon as possible.

    What about the Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) induction?

    The IAF has detailed an Air Vice Marshal to look into the process of LCA induction. Already, four LCAs are flying. Pending issues have been sorted out to complete the project. By 2010, the IAF will have its first squadron of LCAs flying.

    There have been conflicting reports on the IAF acquiring an overseas base in one of the Central Asian Republics and MiG-29 fighters to be located there. When talking about the IAF’s strategic reach, is such a foothold in an energy resources rich region going to help?


    I have only heard of a runway being repaired by us. But there is nothing that I know of regarding deployment of forces there.

    What is the thinking in the IAF of its strategic reach and what ability or capability are we trying to project when we say ‘strategic reach’?

    The IAF today has the necessary mobility and aircraft to operate anywhere, faraway from India’s mainland. We have the necessary platforms, equipment and men. At the same time, our area of interest is dictated by India’s energy security requirements and the region of our interest has grown tremendously. We can now go up to South China Seas with our aircraft, if the need arises.

    Now that the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) clauses pertaining to both Medium Transport Aircraft (MTA) and fifth generation fighter have been finalised between the Russians and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, when can we expect the deal to be inked?

    The negotiations for the MTA and the fifth general fighter development with the Russians are still going on. When we would sign the deal, I cannot say at this point in time. But it will be done pretty soon.

    What is the latest regarding the anti-radar Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) negotiations with the Israelis?

    Yes, we are holding talks regarding the anti-radar UAVs, but nothing has been finalised yet. We are discussing the possibilities as of now.

    What are the weapons systems IAF is looking at for the MRCA? Are Astra and BrahMos among the weapons for the MRCA?


    IAF is looking at a mix of weapons to operate under various roles the MRCA would perform. We are awaiting the aircraft bids and later it will go through technological evaluation, and after that, the weapons systems on the aircraft would be thought about once the aircraft we need has been chosen.

    With the SPYDER air defence system likely to be inducted, what are the IAF’s Air Defence modernisation plans?

    The Air Defence (AD) systems will go through a complete modernisation. The Airborne Early Warning and Control System (AWACS) will be inducted in the IAF in 2008, as also low-level radars. We are, in fact, looking at a whole suite of new AD systems for the IAF. We have gaps in certain areas of AD, which we intend to plug with the new systems coming in.

    You have talked about reducing the number of aircraft types in the IAF fleet. The MRCA contenders have aircraft that are similar to the aircraft already part of the IAF fleet. Does it indicate any kind of preference the IAF may have towards any of the six contending aircraft for the MRCA deal? IAF already has Su-30 MKI and we intend to get the LCA into the fleet. That apart, the MRCA will narrow down the fleet inventory to just two or three aircraft ultimately. How we would achieve this is to be seen, but it will certainly ease maintenance concerns and issues.

    What is happening on the raising of an Aerospace Command? Is the IAF working with the ISRO and the other two Services on setting up the Aerospace Command? And what are the international obligations?

    Aerospace Command is necessarily an offensive command, basically for having eyes in the skies, to provide long reach for a strategic air force. Having sensors in space means a lot of sense when we are serious about where we are going and where we want to go in the long term. Also, a lot needs to be learnt on aerospace operations. We are also talking to the Indian Army and the Indian Navy for having a joint operation in this Aerospace Command. When our military assets are hundreds of miles away from the shore, they also need eyes in the skies to tell them where they are and where they are going. It will take time for us to acquire the necessary capabilities and to have the command itself in place.

    What does the future hold for the IAF as an aerospace power?

    As an aerospace power, with its dramatically increased applicability in war and peace, becomes the `instrument of choice’, IAF’s tasks are set to increase and its resources stretched further. In future, we would also increasingly be called to expand our `reach’. In order to remain a credible force, the IAF is on the threshold of modernisation, of transformational proportions. The endeavour is to acquire long-reach, persistence, all-weather, precision, networked and space-enabled force capabilities. Always conscious of costs, our goal is to acquire only `requisite capability, but well in time; the right people, be organised; for assured performance’; and thus ensure vital national interests. Networks and space significantly enhance air power and extend its effective reach: these are essential `next steps’. Indeed, air and space applications are similar in essence. In addition, we recognise that quality of people is a `force multiplier.’ We invite the country’s best.

    What are the additional features IAF is looking at in the to-be-developed fifth generation fighter aircraft, when compared to the existing fleet?

    We certainly are looking at additional features. It could take another five years for the fifth generation aircraft to be developed and another 10 years before the first aircraft flies.

    In the MRCA RFP issued to six contenders this August, there are differently capable aircraft that are vying with each other. Also, there are vast price differences among the contenders. How is it a fair level playing field?

    As far as IAF is concerned, the aircraft the government ultimately decides to purchase for us should meet the stated QRs of MRCA. Ultimately, the IAF will get only the finest aircraft that have the capabilities that we are looking for in the MRCA. IAF will only evaluate the contenders for matching the standards we expect from the MRCA. We are not part of the price negotiations; this is not the responsibility of the IAF.

    There are reports that China is building air bases closer to the Indian borders? Is it a matter of concern for the IAF?

    We are keeping the developments along the borders with China under observation. Air fields will come up at all places. So what’s important is what sort of development and capabilities that are being built. We will continue to keep a close watch on them.

    What are IAF’s desired force levels?


    The government sanctioned strength is 39.5 fighter squadrons. That is what we want to reach. At present we have 32 squadrons. And the sanctioned strength is our desired force level.

    When will the IAF get a medium surface-to-air missile?

    A: A request for it has already been placed with the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), which is developing it. We are waiting for it to happen soon.

    Most of the joint exercises IAF carries out are with NATO nations. Is there some kind of a new alignment happening in the world?


    Joint exercises are a learning curve for the IAF. We exercise with forces that are modern and more equipped. We need to learn about their practices and new equipment. For example, IAF is getting new AWACS next year. These air forces already have AWACS. We exercise with them on AWACS to learn the procedures on their systems.

    There was an IAF element in the recently concluded 5-nation Malabar naval exercises. Few IAF officers also visited USS Kitty Hawk aircraft carrier. During the exercise, NATO SOPs were followed. What was your experience with NATO SOPs?

    Yes, the IAF did participate in Ex Malabar this September. Our aircraft from Car Nicobar base were on an anti-ship role in the exercise. Since all participating countries, other than India, were NATO members, it was quite natural that the NATO SOPs were followed. The SOPs are for their force levels and for their interoperability. IAF was not part of it.

    Soon, IAF will participate in the Red Flag exercises, which is again a NATO endeavour. Is there a reason behind our increasing joint exercises with NATO countries?

    Red Flag at the Nellis air force base in the US is perhaps one of the best sought after exercises in the air forces today. All kinds of air warfare can be simulated at the Red Flag exercise. So IAF pilots, technicians and airmen would be exposed to the best quality practices and that would enhance their capabilities by participating in Red Flag exercises. We are waiting for government clearance to participate in Red Flag exercise. Participation will be quite useful. Red Flag is basically for any Nat mission. But there is nothing wrong in IAF learning what the NATO forces do and follow. In the recent years, we have enhanced cooperation with other air forces and exercised with some of the best, to train, compare, assimilate best practices and more importantly, strengthen ties of friendship.

    Is there any possibility of the IAF’s increased participation in low-intensity conflict and the anti-terrorism operations of the Indian Army?

    No air force in the world is designed or structured to fight any low intensity conflict on its own. But IAF is ready to fight all spectrum of warfare and it has to. What is the level of IAF’s participation is the issue and it will depend on what help is sought by the Indian Army from IAF. We are already part of UN missions and peace-keeping operations in foreign lands, be it in Somalia or Congo or anywhere else. We have always had the capability to shift gears and fight all types of war.

    With several differences of opinion among the tri-services on various issues emerging in the open in the recent times, what are the prospects of future joint operations?

    Tri-services synergy is the need of the hour. We are convinced that `jointness’ in thinking, planning and exercising and in operations is the way forward and that core competencies of each Service, indeed of all organs of national power, must be synergised to generate the required effect and capability. None of the tri-services fought a battle or conflict all by themselves. The tri-services only execute the national will. If the national will is the motivating factor, then synergy among the tri-services will be possible to achieve.

    Have the tri-services resolved their differences about the phase-II of AV Singh Committee (AVSC-II) implementation?

    The AVSC-II implementation has to happen soon. As IAF chief, I am concerned about my own men’s growth. And my concern is about Group Captains and above up to Air Vice Marshals. I do not worry about Air Marshals. In IAF today, a wing commander commands a squadron, which has another four or five wing commanders under him. This is not desirable force levels. IAF is asking for seven additional three-star officers for equitable functional and operations roles. We want to fill up all three-star posts. Even if the government sanctioned the seven three-star officers, it will take IAF another five years to fill up these posts. The officers would have to be provided with the respectability, dignity and responsibility of a three-star officer’s role. Yes, there are certain differences with other Services, but we are trying to resolve it soon.

    What’s being done for the welfare of the IAF’s human resources?

    There are certain measures that we are trying to implement such as improving the work ethos, work culture and life or well-being of the air warriors. The measures are being pursued vigorously. Policies of welfare are being reviewed, not because we want to change them, but to refine them for better application. Human resources is getting a lot of importance. Welfare activities in the IAF certainly are visibly transparent and implementable.

  8. #128
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    posted on BR..

    first IAF Hawks have started on the ferry journey to land at Bidar AFS.

    IAF Hawks

  9. #129
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    IAF Hawks

    The first two Hawk advanced jet trainers destined to train the next generation of Indian Air Force (IAF) fast jet pilots have departed from the UK to their new home at AFS Bidar in India.

    The two jets are the first of 66 Hawk aircraft to be delivered to the IAF as of part of a total training package required to meet their fast jet pilot training needs. The programme includes 24 aircraft being built in the UK by BAE Systems and 42 aircraft being manufactured under licence in India by Bangalore's Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL).

    A senior Indian Air Force official said: "The induction of the Hawk aircraft marks the fulfilment of a long pending requirement in the Indian Air Force for an Advanced Jet Trainer. The Hawk aircraft, with a proven design and advanced avionics, would bridge the gap between the performance spectrum of the Intermediate trainer and front line fighter aircraft which trainee pilots would finally fly in operational squadrons. As a dedicated trainer, the aircraft would greatly enhance flight safety and have a beneficial impact on the quality of training being imparted to fighter pilots."

    Mark Parkinson, Managing Director Training Solutions at BAE Systems said: "This is a proud day for everyone involved on the Indian Hawk programme. Delivering the first Indian Hawks, on time and budget, marks a significant milestone on the project. We are also particularly pleased to be delivering these exciting new aircraft to the IAF in their 75th Anniversary Year."

    Since the contract was signed in March 2004, the Indian Hawk programme has moved at a tremendous pace. Over the past three years, in addition to manufacturing the IAF Hawks, BAE Systems, in partnership with the RAF, has delivered a training programme that will see on its completion, over 75 IAF pilots trained on the current RAF Hawk fleet at RAF Valley. Many of those who have completed the course have returned to India and gone directly onto the IAF's most sophisticated frontline aircraft – a testament to the skill of the pilots and the training they received during their time at RAF Valley.

    In addition, a number of the Hawks that will be supplied to the IAF have also been used to train around 100 IAF engineering officers and technicians in BAE Systems' Technical Training Academy at Warton who will support the aircraft when it enters service.

    Mark Parkinson continued: "We have also completed conversion training of experienced IAF Flying Instructors to become instructor pilots on the Indian Hawk – these instructors are returning to India to train the Indian Air Force's next generation of frontline pilots.

    "The delivery of these first aircraft is a major milestone on this contract which sees BAE Systems deliver a total training solution geared to the specific requirements of the Indian Air Force. The successful delivery of this programme, on schedule, is a prime example of BAE Systems' capabilities in developing and managing major programmes. "

    The two IAF Hawks will arrive in India after a number of days and refuelling stops. The process of ferrying the aircraft will continue over the coming months until all UK built aircraft are delivered.

    [END OF PRESS RELEASE]


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    Thumbs up

    IAF HAWKS reach Bidar
    Written on November 12, 2007 – 5:35 pm | by FIDSNS |

    Five weeks after the Indian Air Force (IAF) brought curtains down on its platinum jubilee celebrations on October 8, landmarks in IAF continue to be reached.

    Two Hawk Mk 132 advanced jet trainer (AJT) aircraft that departed BAE Systems’, Warton airfield in UK on November 8, reached their intended destination, Air Force Station (AFS), Bidar in north Karnataka, today. The Hawk trainers will impart stage-III training to the newly commissioned fighter pilots of the IAF at Bidar from June, next.

    The Hawk pair flown by a mix crew of BAE Systems and IAF pilots, Wing Commander Pankaj Jain and Squadron Leader Tarun Hindwani, first landed in India at the Jamnagar airbase while ferrying from Muscat, their previous stopover, on their way to Bidar.

    Air Commodore RK Sharma, Air Officer Commanding (AOC), Jamnagar and air warriors of the airbase gave the aircrew an enthusiastic welcome on their maiden touchdown on Indian soil, also more significantly, at the first IAF airbase on arrival. Post the brief stopover for refueling, turn-around-servicing and a brief ceremony to mark the arrival; the Hawk pair took off for Bidar.

    The Hawk’s arrival at AFS Bidar, their designated main operating base, was however marked with even greater an excitement and enthusiasm. The AJT pair was escorted into Bidar airspace by the Suryakirans streaming national colours. They landed in pairs and taxied-in into the designated apron area amidst a rousing welcome by the air warriors of the airbase and their families. Air Marshal GS Chaudhry, Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Training Command and Air Commodore Ramesh Rai, AOC, AFS Bidar, oversaw the first arrival of the aircraft. It was a simple but well orchestrated ceremony.

    Briefly after getting off their new gleaming jets amidst a rapturous applause, the pilots briskly walked over and handed the aircraft documents to Air Marshal Chaudhry, signifying the official aspect of the Hawk Mk 132 aircraft being received into the IAF inventory. The brief ceremony heralded yet another saga towards meeting the training requirements of the IAF pilots. Air Marshal GS Chaudhry seemed visibly pleased to have finally inducted the long awaited AJT into Training Command. He stated that the AJTs inclusion into the training curriculum of the fighter pilots should improve the training and flight safety standards of the IAF

    The two jets that arrived today are among the first of the 66 Hawk Mk 132 aircraft to be delivered to the IAF by BAE Systems, UK. By this year-end, four more Hawks will be ferried-in, and by mid-February, six more are scheduled to arrive in a phased manner. Of the 66 aircraft being purchased, 24 are being developed, built and supplied by BAE Systems, UK; while Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), Bangalore will manufacture the remaining 42 aircraft under licence in India. The completion of the delivery schedule will see all the 66 aircraft operational by 2010-11.

    Meanwhile AFS Bidar that has recently been refurbished to house the latest acquisition is abuzz with anticipation. Apart from the fact that the runway has been extended to 9,000 feet, technical facilities have also been readied to accommodate the fleet in its entirety. “Framing of the flying and operating procedures in the local flying area will take top priority,” informed Air Commodore Rai, adding that the instructor’s conversion will also begin in right earnest after some preliminary formalities, within the next few days.

    link

    Awaiting pictures!
    PEOPLE.FIRST.MISSION.ALWAYS.
    Have a good one..

  11. #131
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    Thumbs up

    this is a very significant event for the IAF.. by mid-next year, the IAF can stop sending its pilots to the UK for training..

  12. #132
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    Smile Money is not for just the aircraft

    Quote Originally Posted by Shalav View Post
    RE: C130J

    All well and good!

    But its still 640 crores per aircraft! What's it got that can't be done with cheaper airframes?

    Why isn't the IAF putting in locally made missile warning receivers. Aren't they good enough? What about the Tarang? If its good enough for the MKI its should be good enough for the hercs as an RWR.

    This deal doesn't make any sense at all. Its too expensive and it purchases one-off technologies which if sanctioned would ground the entire fleet and Rs. 4,000 crores! There is no mention of any commitment from the Americans that these supplies are not sanctionable.

    The total INITIAL COST of this is reported as around $ 1b which is Rs. 4,000 crores! Add lifecycle costs (spares, maintanence, infrastructure) and we are looking at roughly at - what - 6,000 crores in total?!

    Imagine that - the IAF wants to spend 6,000 crores on six aircraft! This is not US aid or a grant or a gift. It seems India has managed to negotiate TOP PRICE for the airframes. Where is the CAG when you need them? Where is the tender process? I haven't seen anything. When was it issued? Who responded? What were the competing bids?

    Write to or email your MP.
    It includes


    6 Lockheed Martin C-130J United States Air Force (USAF) baseline aircraft including USAF baseline equipment
    4 Rolls Royce AE 2100D3 spare engines
    8 AAR-47 Missile Warning Systems (two of them spares)
    8 AN/ALR-56M Advanced Radar Warning Receivers (two of them spares)
    8 AN/ALE-47 Counter-Measures Dispensing Systems (two of them spares)
    8 AAQ-22 Star SAFIRE III Special Operations Suites (two of them spares)
    8 ALQ-211 Suite of Integrated Radio Frequency Countermeasures (two of them spares)
    2 spare AN/ARC-210 Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio Systems (SINCGARS)
    8 spare Secure Voice Very High Frequency/Ultra High Frequency Radios
    4 spare Secure Voice High Frequency Radios
    3 spare AN/AAR-222 SINCGARS and Key Gen (KV-10) Systems
    1 KIV-119 Non-standard Communication/COMSEC equipment
    2 ARC-210 Non-standard Communication/COMSEC equipment

  13. #133
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    What part of the getup turns it from a Military transport to a Spec ops ? Will it have a Howitzer or mortors on it or something similar?
    Wrinkles wrinkles my kingdom fallen to a wrinkle

  14. #134
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    I am not entirely sure but do all those equipment added to the C-130 turn it into a version of MC-130 combat talon? The price of a combat talon is close to $ 155 million, nearly what India is paying for the C-130's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt View Post
    What part of the getup turns it from a Military transport to a Spec ops ? Will it have a Howitzer or mortors on it or something similar?
    Weapons are not part of the package, the specia forces element will likely be improved self defense and navigation systems.

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    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by matt View Post
    What part of the getup turns it from a Military transport to a Spec ops ? Will it have a Howitzer or mortors on it or something similar?
    The US has agreed to lease Steven Seagal for special ops, and Steven Chuck Norris for special special ops.
    That has raised the cost of the deal to the current amounts.

    But the Chuck Norris option will allow chaff and flares expenses to be reduced, as any missile approaching the plane will self destruct out of fear.

  17. #137
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    Does this mean someone has got a large backhander?
    Wrinkles wrinkles my kingdom fallen to a wrinkle

  18. #138
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick_76 View Post
    The US has agreed to lease Steven Seagal for special ops, and Steven Chuck Norris for special special ops.
    That has raised the cost of the deal to the current amounts.

    But the Chuck Norris option will allow chaff and flares expenses to be reduced, as any missile approaching the plane will self destruct out of fear.
    Steven Seagal .. hmm ... then the package is worth it .....

    too bad Sylvester Stallone is busy in Afghanistan and bordering areas ,,,, he would have come in handy too !!

  19. #139
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    Kaveri engine core undergoes testing


    http://www.hindu.com/2007/11/19/stor...1960551200.htm

    BANGALORE: Kabini, the core of the much-delayed Kaveri engine, is undergoing high altitude testing at the Central Institute of Aviation Motors (CIAM) in Moscow.

    It has been taken by a team from the Bangalore-based Gas Turbine Research Establishment.

    Kabini primarily makes up Kaveri’s high pressure compressor, high pressure turbine and high pressure combustor.

    This is the second time that Kabini is taken to Moscow.

    The team is headed by GTRE director T. Mohan Rao. It is hoped that the tests will generate sufficient data to allow a study of the characteristics of the components.

    The GTRE had made a number of modifications to the Kabini since its last test in Moscow.

    While the tests in Moscow are a necessary step, as India does not have such high altitude testing facilities, the process to identify a partner who will co-develop and co-produce the Kaveri along with the GTRE has been further delayed.



    http://frontierindia.net/kaveri-engi...hers-momentum/

    K9 + Program

    This program has been conceptualized with a view to prove the concept of complete design and gain hand-on experience of aircraft engine integration and flight trials to cover a defined truncated flight envelope prior to the launch of production version of K10 Std. engine. This exercise would generate a great deal of confidence in the minds of entire scientific community of GTRE and associated work centers. The PDC for K9+ is June 2008. As compared to final Kaveri Engine, K9+ engine has more weight, slightly lower After Burner thrust as compared to the design intent. At the moment, GTRE has been able to achieve and demonstrate the required dry thrust at Bangalore condition consistently. The various prototypes of the engine are undergoing various engine level tests, safety related tests, component level tests, endurance tests which are mandatory before first flight of the K9 + engine with PV1 of LCA. The core engine (Kabini engine) has been planned to be sent to CIAM Russia for altitude tests by end Aug 2007. The official Altitude Test and Flying Test Bed for K9+ engines is planned for Nov 2007. All this will culminate in integrating the Kaveri K9 + engine with PV1 followed by first interim flight by June 2008.
    so, they're meeting deadlines for the K9+ engine..hopefully, if everything goes well, they'll be able to get the K9+ on the PV-1 Tejas by mid-2008.

  20. #140
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    Exclamation IAF likes the Akash, the Army’s not impressed

    IAF likes the Akash, the Army’s not impressed

    The indigenously developed surface-to-air missile Akash, capable of engaging multiple targets, has impressed the Indian Air Force but not the Army.

    The contradictory stands come at a time when Akash is going through a series of tests in the desert near Pokhran before full flight tests at the Balasore range along the Bay of Bengal.

    According to defence sources, the IAF, impressed with the short-range missile that can identify enemy objects and engage multiple targets, has written to the Defence Research and Development Organisation offering to induct it in two units.

    But the Army has written to the DRDO rejecting the system, pointing out that it was too late in the day for induction. Sources say “we are focused on the induction of Akash into the Air Force”.

    “If the tests are successful in Pokhran then we will go in for the flight test in Balasore,” sources told DNA. If the flight test too was successful, production would begin.

    Sources said the present tests in Pokhran were looking at “consistency” in the battery control centre, battery level radar and the launcher. Besides, it was looking at the efficacy of the system in identifying friend or foe accurately. The validation is being done by flying a number of aircraft and testing the accuracy of the system in identification of friend and foe.

    Sources said if all the tests in Pokhran and Balasore were successful, induction in the IAF would begin. Serial production would have Bharat Electronics Limited as the lead contractor but with several private sector players actively involved.

    http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/n...hp?newsid=9657

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  22. #142
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    From RoyFC.com


    Radar Reconnaissance Airplane to Be Transferred to Indian Air Force before Year’s End – TANTK Beriev

    Source: 10.12.07, Gudok


    The first of three long-range radar detection EhI (DRLO) airplanes which are being built for an Indian air force order, will be sent for further tests in Israel before year’s end, the chief of the Beriev Taganrog Aviation Scientific and Engineering Complex (TANTK) OKB, Ivan Gavrilov, has reported.

    “The first EhI airplane which was created based on the Il-76, was lifted into the air for the first time on 26 November. Right now it is being finished. After that, it has to make eight test flights. At the end of the year it is supposed to fly to Israel where tests will continue,” I. Gavrilov said, who on Friday took part in the presentation in Moscow of a book which is devoted to the well known designer of hydroplanes, Georgiy Beriev (Beriashvili).

    I. Gavrilov reported that work on the EhI airplanes is being carried out jointly by the Beriev TANTK and the Israeli firm Elta.

  23. #143
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    Some pictures from IAF's Fire Power Display 2007. More pictures and description available here.

    Credits : IAF via BR.




  24. #144
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    Thumbs up



    Jai at his tricks again!

    Deepika Padukone! Eat your heart out! :diablo:
    Important Hyper Note: I am NOT an Aeronautical Engineer NOR an Aerospace Expert, etc, etc nor do I claim to be one.
    Regards,
    Hyper McStupid

  25. #145
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    Tejas moves one step closer to A2G weaponisation. Just about a month ago, the R-73 was test fired from the Tejas, so the pace of weaponisation is picking up very fast.

    Litening pod tested on LCA Tejas
    Written on December 11, 2007 – 6:49 pm | by FIDSNS |

    The Tejas LCA programme received a major fillip with the first successful flight test using the ‘Litening’ pod which can provide the pilot with day and night pictures of terrain, laser ranging and laser spot seeking (LDP). In a flawless flight on 10 Dec 07, Prototype Vehicle-2 took off with the LDP at around 1630 hrs and completed a landmark flight in which all test objectives were achieved.

    Wg Cdr N Tiwari of the National Flight Test centre flew the flight. Wg Cdr M Prabhu as the Test Director, Mr RS Rao, Project Direct (Systems) and Mr JJ Jhadhav, Deputy Project Director were present at the telemetry station to monitor the performance. The performance is as per the design.

    The LCA Team consisting members from IAF, HAL-ARDC ADA, CEMILAC and DG-AQA have together worked for several months to make this success in the first attempt. Carriage of the LDP confers a significant precision strike capability to the Tejas in conjunction with laser guided bombs or what are commonly referred to as “smart bombs”.
    http://frontierindia.net/litening-po...-on-lca-tejas/

  26. #146
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    higher quality pics posted on BR by Gopal Suri.

    Litening LDP on Tejas

    http://frontierindia.net/temp/lighte...on%20Tejas.jpg


    PV-1 in flight

    http://frontierindia.net/temp/LCA%20...ning%20pod.jpg
    Last edited by 21Ankush; 11th December 2007 at 17:52.

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    http://www.hindu.com/2007/12/17/stor...1760351900.htm

    Combat aircraft engine: Eurojet ready to help
    BANGALORE: As India tries to break into the elite group of countries that have designed and developed combat aircraft engines, Eurojet Turbo GmbH the European consortium that builds and maintains the advanced military turbofan Eurojet EJ200 says it is ready to assist India: either by developing an engine together or transferring technology on the EJ200.

    The EJ200 is the power plant of the Eurofighter Typhoon, one of the world’s most advanced combat aircraft and a contender vying for the $11 billion, 126 combat aircraft deal that India is contemplating signing.

    Speaking to The Hindu, Eurojet’s Business Development Executive Paul Herrmann said the consortium, whose partner companies are Rolls-Royce, Avio of Italy, ITP of Spain and MTU Aero Engines of Germany, was ready to transfer “secured data” (software) related to the EJ200’s development, envelope, handling, and performance in flight to the Aeronautical Developing Agency(ADA), the defence laboratory, which is developing the Light Combat Aircraft Tejas.

    The Eurojet has already signed a non-disclosure agreement with ADA. “If India wants our technology to develop an engine for the Tejas we are ready. We would like an arrangement that goes beyond just consultancy, even a risk and revenue sharing relationship. ADA will shortly do a detailed assessment of our engine.”

    According to Mr. Herrmann transferring the software would not be a problem in the wake of the Defence cooperation agreement signed between India and Germany in September 2006, and the enlarged bilateral defence cooperation statement issued jointly by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and German Chancellor Angela Merkel last October.

    The statement envisages the scope of defence cooperation to include exchange of information and cooperation in defence technological research, armament procurement projects including project related development and defence technology.

    “We know that the Tejas has to be capable of performing as a trainer, and both from a carrier as well as from the land. We have also made a presentation to the Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE).”

    Commenting on the performance of the Kaveri under development, he said that though it was good, its thermo dynamic cycle was being built to a criteria that was over 20 years old. “The turbo mechanism needs to be re-considered depending for what purpose the aircraft is being used, and it also has to be put together in a new way.”

    The Eurojet representatives have also met and made a presentation to senior officers of the Indian Air Force (IAF), the end-users of the Tejas. Sources point out that the IAF has been viewing the EJ200 quite favourably.


    Production of the EJ200 started in 2002. So far over 400 of these engines have been delivered to customers. While Tranche 2 of the EJ200 engines which feature innovative engine control and monitoring technology have already started, Tranche 3, which could offer thrust vectoring is being evaluated.
    coming shortly after the bashing of the Kaveri and the Tejas by Ravi Sharma, this 'timely' offer for the EJ-200 is very interesting. so, now we have Snecma, Salyut and the Eurojet consortium, all offering to help develop the Kaveri further.

  29. #149
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    link

    good news for Akash, now lets see how many orders are placed.

    Akash SAM downs UAV in flight trial
    Written on December 21, 2007 – 5:50 pm | by FIDSNS |

    The Akash Missile has successfully hit the bull’s eye for the fifth time in a row in the last ten days at test range in Balasore. The fifth and last trial successfully took place at 2.15 pm today at Chandipur- on- sea. The missile destroyed an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), which was flying simulating the air attack. The target vanished from the radar screen when the missile was guided precisely in close proximity and the warhead blast occurred, much to the delight of users present in the flight campaign. This is the grand finale of the ten days users campaign meticulously planned by the Indian Air Force.

    Akash is a moblie, mulitiple target handling, medium range Air Defence missile developed under Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme (IGMDP). The missile system has been configured to be part of futuristic network centric operation, most of the operations having been made automated. The entire weapon system has gone through functional evaluation in Kolar near Bangalore followed by operation and mobility trials in Pokharan ranges. The ECCM (Electronic Counter Counter Measure) evaluation was carried out at Gwalior by Air Force against various types of electronic target and counter measures. The final phase of user evaluation as part of user trials was done in Chandipur. ITR, Balasore provides world’s best instrumentation facilities. The flight was conducted under the leadership of Dr Panyam, Project Director. Dr Prahlada, who conceptualised Akash and now Chief Controller at DRDO HQ was present during campaign.

    About 300 strong team was present for ten days campaign. Representatives from public sector BDL, BEL etc were also present.

    Indian Air Force officials witnessed users trial. With the conclusion of Akash evaluation, the is now available for indigenous production in the country. The missile system is uniquely configured and customised for Indian Army and Air Force.

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    Eurocopter tender cancelled, France 'disappointed'


    CNN-IBN

    Published on Fri, Dec 21, 2007 at 13:39, Updated at Fri, Dec 21, 2007 in World section
    DEAL DOOM: The Indian Ministry of Defence cancelled the tender for nearly 200 helicopters.

    New Delhi: France is disappointed with Ministry of Defence over the cancelled Eurocopter tender for nearly 200 helicopters. The tender has been cancelled after a seven-year selection process.

    Visiting French Foreign Minister Bernard Kourchner also expressed concern over the slow and uncertain nature of India's defence procurement process compared to countries like China.


    He also indicated no progress in the Mirage upgrade contract but that was as far as he would go.


    With President Nicholas Sarkozy the Chief Guest at the Republic Day celebrations next month, the French minister said Paris remained optimistic about its chances and would persevere with the contract.

    A part of European aerospace major European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS), Eurocopter was to supply 197 helicopters to the Indian Army.

    Eurocopter had been contracted to sell 60 complete helicopters to the Army, while the remaining 137 were to be assembled at state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd in the country.
    PEOPLE.FIRST.MISSION.ALWAYS.
    Have a good one..

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