Key.Aero Network
Register Free

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 50

Thread: Yugoslavia IAR93

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    76

    Yugoslavia IAR93

    Have you ever hear of the Yugoslavia IAR 93 attacker?I wonder its details.I hope if one of you who knows about it that he can help me to have gotten the imformation.Thank you!

    And is anyone here who comes from the former Yugoslavia?Maybe you can tell me something about it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    3,255
    it's Romanian................ yup.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    CROATIA
    Posts
    424

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    95
    It is made both by Romania and Yugoslavia. Powered by Rolls Royce Engines, devised in the 1970. Initially conceived with a similar role as the Jaguar. Light attack, with limited AA capability. No radar but Mavericks on Yugoslavian models (in the 1970, the USA supplied Yugoslavia with weapons), Durandals on Romanian models.
    The model is still in service in Serbia and Bosnia. Romanian Air force had grounded its planes in 1998 and replaced it with a new light attack plane , the IAR 99


    More details here
    The joint international programme known as Jurom was initiated in 1970 to meet the joint requirement of the air forces of neutral Yugoslavia and then-Warsaw Pact member Romania for a single-seat close support/ground-attack aircraft. This partnership was hardly surprising, since then Romanian President Nikolai Ceasescu was a committed isolationist who strove to weaken Soviet influence by forging links with nations outside the Warsaw Pact, and to build up Romania's aircraft industry through international cooperation. This had led to the licence-manufacture of the BAC One-Eleven and Aerospatiale Alouette and Puma helicopters.

    In the interests of national pride it was important that the project seemed to be completely collaborative, with neither nation appearing to have project leadership. Thus the aircraft was jointly designed by engineers from Yugoslavia's Vazdulnoplovno Technicki lnstitut and Romania's Institutal de Macanica Fluidelor si Constructii Aerospatiale, while manufacture was entrusted to SOKO and Centrul National al Industriei Aeronautice Romane (CNIAR). Each company constructed prototypes which were flown simultaneously in the two countries on 31 October 1974. These were powered by non-afterburning Viper Mk 622-41R turbojets and were followed by a pair of two-seat trainer prototypes, again flown simultaneously on 29 January 1977. Both versions have the same designation in their respective countries, with no separate designation for two-seaters: J-22 Orao (eagle) in Yugoslavia and IAR-93 in Romania. Following the flight of the two-seat prototypes both companies began the construction of I 5-aircraft pre-production batches, and the first examples were flown during 1978.

    Series production of the IAR-93 began in 1979, and of the J-22 in 1980. The initial batch of 20 aircraft in each country lacked afterburners but introduced some changes by comparison with the prototypes. In Yugoslavia the lack of power led to allocation to the reconnaissance role, under the revised designation W-22, and there are persistent but unconfirmed reports that a handful of the batch were NJ-22 two-seat trainers. In Romania the initial batch of aircraft was designated 1AR-93A, and again there were reports that the total included some two-seat trainers.

    The definitive production aircraft featured the afterburning Viper Mk 633-41 engine, and was designated J-22(M) or Orao 2 in Yugoslavia, and IAR-938 in Romania. The Orao 2 prototype first flew on 20 October 1983, and the type entered production in 1984, although deliveries were delayed until 1986 by the non-arrival of afterburning engines. The variant introduced extended wing leading-edge roots, increased internal fuel capacity and the inboard overwing fences were deleted. Underwing hardpoints were uprated to carry loads of up to 500 kg (1,102-lb) each, and the centreline was cleared for 800 kg (1,763 lb). Finally the aircraft received new avionics, including a Thomson-CSF VE-120T HUD. The prototype and some early aircraft were fitted with prominent vortex generators on each side of the nose, but these have since been deleted.

    The equivalent Romanian IAR-93B first flew in 1985, and differed from the Orao 2 in lacking ventral fins and tailplane anti-flutter weights, and in having a new ranging radar in the nose and a relocated Doppler antenna. The canopy is also redesigned, and now opens sideways, instead of upwards.

    There are two-seat versions of both the 1AR-93B and the J-22M, the Yugoslav aircraft having the new designation Orao 2B or NJ-22(M). Some of these two-seaters may have been produced by the conversion of early 1AR-93A and NJ-22 trainers, since some retain the original four-fence wing. Whether the original trainers had the extended wingroot remains uncertain.

    Specification
    SOKO/CNIAR IAR-93B

    Type: single-seat close-support/g round attack aircraft

    Powerplant: two 2268-kg (5,000-lb) afterburning thrust Turbomecanica licence-built Rolls-Royce Viper Mk 633-47 turbojets

    Performance: maximum speed 1160 km/h (721 mph) at sea level, service ceiling 12500 m (41,010ft); mission radius with four 250-kg (551 -lb) bombs and auxiliary fuel 530 km (329 miles)

    Weights: empty equipped 5900 kg (13,007 lb); maximum take-off 10100 kg (22,267 lb) Dimensions: span 9.62 m (31 ft 6V, in); length 14.90 m (48 ft 1 01K in) height 4.45 m (14 ft 71X in); wing area 26.00 M2 (279.87 sq. ft)

    Armament: two 23-mm GSh-231L cannon in lower forward fuselage, plus five external hardpoints; total maximum load of 1500 kg (3,307 lb); stores can include bombs, rockets, cannon pods, reconnaissance pod, night illumination pod, and auxiliary fuel tanks"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    10,590
    .. besides Romania and Yugoslavia the only other air force to use the bird is the airforce of Republika Srpska, ergo Bosnian Serb Republic..

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    76
    Are the birds that being operated now in the air forces of the former Yugoslavia?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    10,590

    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by daxiong
    Are the birds that being operated now in the air forces of the former Yugoslavia?
    Slovenia - No (PC-9M in the attacker role)
    Croatia - No (MiG-21bis in the attacker role)
    Bosnian Serb Republic - Yes
    Bosnia i Herzegovina - No (no fast jets in the inventory)
    Serbia & Montenegro (Yugoslavia) - Yes
    Macedonia - No (Su-25 in the attacker role)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    belgrade, serbia
    Posts
    3,567
    .. besides Romania and Yugoslavia the only other air force to use the bird is the airforce of Republika Srpska, ergo Bosnian Serb Republic..
    True. But hardly telling. They didn't exactly chose it - rather it was amongst the types they inherited and so its in their inventory by default (much like everything else they operate).
    Regards, Ivan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by andrei
    No radar but Mavericks on Yugoslavian models (in the 1970, the USA supplied Yugoslavia with weapons), Durandals on Romanian models.

    I wonder what sort of weapon did American supply.

    I also wonder the weapons produced in Yugoslavia which could be carried by the IAR 93.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    belgrade, serbia
    Posts
    3,567
    Just to clarify:

    IAR 93 is the Romanian produced version
    J 22 is the Yugoslav produced version
    Regards, Ivan

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    95
    Weapons supplied by the US to Yugoslavia in the 1970 (among others)
    M47 tanks
    M113 with Tows
    M3 armored carriers
    155 howitzers
    Sykorsky helicopters
    Mavericks and Aim 9 C,D(Sidewinders)
    Funny to think that in the Seventies, the US marines were training in operations to protect Yugoslavia from a Russian attack through Hungary or Bulgaria. There was even a famous NATO general (Sir John Hackett) who published a book in 1983 (the Thirld World War) which stated that US forces should come to rescue Yugoslavia from Soviet intervention and this would hypothetically lead to a thirld World war. At that time, Yugoslavia was a neutral country like FInland with a socialist government and relatively open economy. The US considered it as a buffer zone if not an ally and would have committed troops to defend it.
    Ten years later it was the other way around with Russia coming to the rescue supplying weapons , satellites imagery and then in 1999, sending in paratroopers to seize the Pristina airport and avoid its capture by British forces.
    History teaches a lesson of humility, beware of let your judgement blurried by propaganda

  12. #12
    Miroslav Guest
    Andrei lots of your info is wrong.

    As for J-22 it carries the following weapons:

    -2 23mm cannons
    -AGM-65B Maverick
    -Grom (larger AS-7 kerry copy)
    -BL-755 cluster bombs
    -AA-2 Atoll heatseeking missiles
    -FLAB-350 napalm tanks
    -57 mm or 128 mm unguided rockets
    -plus a whole lot of other iron bombs, and also mines

    Also at least one J-22 can carry AA-8 Aphids

    The J-22M (morski) has a radar but I am not sure if this version has survived.

    In the late 80's there was a plan to upgrade J-22's with a more powerful engine which would have increased its speed to around Mach 1.3-4 and vastly increased its payload, and to redesign the nose to allow installation of a radar, and lots of new guided weapons. But you all know why this never happened.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    76
    So,what does the IAR mean?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    10,590
    Quote Originally Posted by daxiong
    So,what does the IAR mean?
    http://www.iar.ro/

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    10,590
    The thing surely can turn quite a bit...



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    BBU
    Posts
    543
    Quote Originally Posted by flex297
    That`s a link to I.A.R. Brasov...that factory belongs to Eurocopter. That`s a helicopter factory. Also build ultra lights and gliders.

    I.A.R.-93 was built at Craiova at Fabrica de Avioane Craiova....I can`t find a link to that.

    I.A.R. = Industria Aeronautica Romana or Romanian Aeronautical Industry.

    Here are two photos I took of the prototype of IAR-93DC...sorry for the quality..I was in a hurry. Photos taken at Romanian Aviation Museum.


  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    95

    iAR/93 AND 99 PICS

    Here some extra pics (two ) of the IAR 93 now retired from the Romanian Air force. It was produced by Avioane Craiova (www.acv.ro), not www.iar.ro which is a helicopter producer.
    I m adding s three more picks, of the Iar 99, a light attack and trainer.
    25 have been ordered in the modernised version (electronics, Hud , ECM etc). All electronics are Elbit Israel and Romanian. More details on www.acv.ro
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	iar-93-5x.jpg 
Views:	309 
Size:	36.7 KB 
ID:	98072   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	iar-93-b-2x.jpg 
Views:	535 
Size:	36.7 KB 
ID:	98073   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IAR-99_4.jpg 
Views:	382 
Size:	44.5 KB 
ID:	98074   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IAR-99_8.jpg 
Views:	401 
Size:	44.9 KB 
ID:	98075   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IAR99_cockpit.jpg 
Views:	256 
Size:	50.0 KB 
ID:	98076  


  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,929
    If those are two russian twin barrelled 30mm cannon, it's a nice bit of mudmoving equipment. Even if they are 23mm, still pretty good fire power gun alone

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    The Second Foundation
    Posts
    2,005
    That's a very nice looking aircraft.
    But what a fool believes, he sees
    No wise man has the power to reason away

    -The Doobie Brothers

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    belgrade, serbia
    Posts
    3,567
    Wanshan,

    Even if they are 23mm, still pretty good fire power gun alone
    They are 23mm but it does make for a very pretty pyrotechnics show when they're fired at an enemy position. Not sure how really effective that is though...

    Victor,

    That's a very nice looking aircraft.
    I like its looks too - the problem is that I wince every time I look at it because it reminds me of a missed opportunity.
    Regards, Ivan

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,373
    The J-22/IAR-93 are very nice aircraft and cheap too, I'm surprised that no Third World nation approach Serbia or Romania for the type...

  22. #22
    Miroslav Guest
    Yugoslavia/Romania made absolutely no marketing effort because the production lines were at full capacity making planes for the YuAF/RoAF so there would have been no point in marketing the plane to another country since that country would have had to wait many years until the YuAF/RoAF had enough planes so that production for that customer could be started.

    I know Iran tried to buy it but the deal never went through.

  23. #23
    Miroslav Guest
    Here are some pictures:

    1. The plane tested with canards
    2. Standard cockpit
    3. Bunch of planes waiting to be scrapped
    4. Simulator to train pilots
    5. IAR-95
    6. Another design of the IAR-95

    The pictures come from International Air Power Review, winter 2001-02.

    The IAR-95 was a Romanian supersonic project that was cancelled. Some say the FC-1 is based on the IAR-95 plans that Romania sold to China. They do look very similar.

    As for the J-22/IAR-93 it was intended to be supersonic too. But Britain decided to not give the engine that Yugoslavia/Romania wanted (because Romania was in the WP) and only gave a less powerful engine so the plane's official speed is Mach 0.95. Although it is capable of exceeding Mach 1 when not carrying any weapons. November 22 1984 is significant in Yugoslav aviation history because that is the first time that a Yugoslav-built plane exceeded Mach 1.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	canards.jpg 
Views:	278 
Size:	14.1 KB 
ID:	98244   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cockpit.jpg 
Views:	354 
Size:	23.1 KB 
ID:	98245   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scrapping.jpg 
Views:	389 
Size:	69.5 KB 
ID:	98246   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	simulator.jpg 
Views:	195 
Size:	24.8 KB 
ID:	98247   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	iar95-1.jpg 
Views:	822 
Size:	14.8 KB 
ID:	98248  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	iar95-2.jpg 
Views:	358 
Size:	17.8 KB 
ID:	98249  

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by Miroslav
    The IAR-95 was a Romanian supersonic project that was cancelled. Some say the FC-1 is based on the IAR-95 plans that Romania sold to China. They do look very similar.
    I have ever heard that China had got all informations about the design of Iar.93 from Yugoslava or Romania.Anyone here have known those?

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    221
    interet to known that Chinese AF JH-7 airframe is based on IAR-93.
    according to Chinese magazine,by late 60's PLAAF is looking for replacement for H-5 "beagle" twin jey light bomber,originally they plan clone copy of MiG-23,(with chin air intake),but swing mechanism prove to be complicated,by early 80's they manage to obtain blue print of IAR-93,from the blue print come JH-7.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Free Country
    Posts
    725
    Looks are very similar to Jags.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,929
    Quote Originally Posted by ink
    Wanshan,
    They are 23mm but it does make for a very pretty pyrotechnics show when they're fired at an enemy position. Not sure how really effective that is though...
    With the right choice of modern 23mm ammo may still be very effective in mud moving. Should be at least similar to 20mm gatling ammo. Which is still main armament of AH-1 Cobra.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    belgrade, serbia
    Posts
    3,567
    With the right choice of modern 23mm ammo may still be very effective in mud moving. Should be at least similar to 20mm gatling ammo. Which is still main armament of AH-1 Cobra.
    Agreed. However, the accuracy of a helicopter cannon and the accuracy of a jet cannon are not the same thing. Take into account also the rudimentary sighting system that an J-22 has... Not to mention the danger of swooping down on a target to strafe it with guns when you're not sitting in an armoured 'bath tub' and your aircraft has only limited anti-IR counter-measures.
    Regards, Ivan

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,373
    Quote Originally Posted by Miroslav
    Here are some pictures:

    1. The plane tested with canards
    2. Standard cockpit
    3. Bunch of planes waiting to be scrapped
    4. Simulator to train pilots
    5. IAR-95
    6. Another design of the IAR-95

    The pictures come from International Air Power Review, winter 2001-02.

    The IAR-95 was a Romanian supersonic project that was cancelled. Some say the FC-1 is based on the IAR-95 plans that Romania sold to China. They do look very similar.

    As for the J-22/IAR-93 it was intended to be supersonic too. But Britain decided to not give the engine that Yugoslavia/Romania wanted (because Romania was in the WP) and only gave a less powerful engine so the plane's official speed is Mach 0.95. Although it is capable of exceeding Mach 1 when not carrying any weapons. November 22 1984 is significant in Yugoslav aviation history because that is the first time that a Yugoslav-built plane exceeded Mach 1.
    Concerning the IAR-95, why was it cancelled?

    was it economic problems?

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by challenge
    interet to known that Chinese AF JH-7 airframe is based on IAR-93.
    I'm afraid I can't agree to your opinion for there is too many diffenences between the two.
    But I have also see something making me think that there may be some connections between them.
    After all,there is too much different:such as One can carry 7tons of arms,another can't.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

- Part of the    Network -

KEY AERO AVIATION NEWS

MAGAZINES

AVIATION FORUM

SHOP

 

WEBSITES