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Thread: Standard Beaverette

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    19

    Standard Beaverette

    Hi,

    I am currently restoring the following Standard Beaverette.
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1943-STAND...p2047675.l2557

    I am looking for photo's of Standard Beaverette's be they war time or post war, complete or cut down etc.

    If anyone able to upload/post/send me the photos or information I would be very interested.

    Seem's they were popular to tow aircraft and gliders around post war once the body had been cut down.

    Thanks
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ely, Cambridgeshire
    Posts
    942
    Crikey - that's a bit different from the only other Beaverette I know - the armoured one at Duxford.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Listening out for something interesting approaching...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,410
    You can find a couple of photos of a cut down Berverette towing a glider in this thread.
    http://forum.keypublishing.com/showt...-1926-1970-pdf

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Where you wish you were.
    Posts
    8,997
    I've never heard of it but it seems just the thing to tow one's DHC Beaver.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8,245

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,635
    This comes from the Wikipedia entry

    Describing the vehicle in 1941, a correspondent for The Light Car magazine reported "touching the 60-mark [60 mph (97 km/h)]" while following one along a road. Restricted vision meant the Beaverette driver had to rely on an observer to relay information about other road traffic and also to consider situations well in advance, for example when making a turn, the driver had to base his steering on "observations made something like ten yards [30.00 ft (9.14 m)] back."

    Doesn't exactly inspire confidence but then this was the nation that gave us the Saro Lerwick.

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