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Thread: Help to Identify aircraft part please

  1. #1
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    Help to Identify aircraft part please

    Hi Guys

    I was at Flying Legends last week helping out on the Typhoon project stall. I was chatting to a chap about RB396 and he showed me a photo of an item he had been given some years ago. He said it had originally come from a crashed aircraft somewhere near RAF Usworth. He asked me if I could identify it - I couldn’t but I thought somebody here might have an idea
    There are various numbers on the aluminium joiner sleeves. - PD62708AR, PD32708AL and another bigger number, PA31079
    It seems to be some kind of differential unit driven by the centre sprocket. The joiner sleeves are about 35 mm diameter and the sprocket about 90 mm across. It has wood pressed in each end of the steel outputs presumably to stiffen them from distorting. Possible traces of dark green paint on one tube.
    Any assistance gratefully received!
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    pb::

  2. #2
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    Possibly Miles-Percival in the aircraft manufacturers parts list PAC and PPA is near to PA/ PD. 17G could be balloon

  3. #3
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    It's a differential gearset of some sort. I'm suspecting controls but can't imagine where it was utilised - unless it's some sort of mixing unit.

    Anon.

  4. #4
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    I thought it might be part of an autopilot, but that is just a wild guess!
    pb::

  5. #5
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    Its a bit like a car differential where the big sprocket would turn both shafts simultaneously in the same rotational direction but the pair of shaft can also be rotated on opposite directions, flaperons perhaps.
    Did any aircraft use rotating drive shafts to function control movement.

    Richard
    "Where are you from?"
    "America" Somebody laughed politely.

  6. #6
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    Taking a clue from what scorpion63 said about this possibly being something from Miles/Percival which obviously links to Hunting as well and going on my previous post on it being part of a differential control system. Could this be something to do with the Hunting H.126 research aircraft, XN714 survives at Cosford and another was part built, never completed, before disposal from Aston Down, has anyone seen pictures of the Cosford one with the panels off, its all a bit unlikely I know.

    https://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarch...0-%200477.html This part might even be visible in the image from Flight 1963.

    Richard

    Richard
    "Where are you from?"
    "America" Somebody laughed politely.

  7. #7
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    Thank-you all for your interesting responses. It's remarkable how often parts are identified on here, but I guess even with a part where there are numbers available and the item has a clear mode of operation that is not always possible

  8. #8
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    Is it not for aileron? I seem to recall something similar possibly off a B17 but that part I am sure is British

  9. #9
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    It reminds me of a differential control/flap unit, where the main lever controlled the flaps or ailerons via the main gear to operate them both, but some element of roll control was available via the differential.

    It's obviously old because anything after the 1950's would have had hydraulically operated controls. Seems to me it certainly came from a smaller single or twin-engined aircraft type but big and expensive enough to justify such a piece of good engineering. Most likely military.

    Anon.

  10. #10
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    looks like the inner differential control for a turret of some type, tank or aircraft, i have never seen an aircraft with a differential type flap control but could be wrong.

  11. #11
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    Not necessarily pre 1950's, the flaps and slats in the Panavia Tornado are rotating mechanical control runs with a similar arrangement, hydraulically driven by a central FSDU (flap slat drive unit).

  12. #12
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    Pogno's suggestion of H.126 is worth following up - it did have an unusual control system, including something at the tail which may well have had a differential control linkage.

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