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Thread: Bomb Shackle Part ID

  1. #1
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    Bomb Shackle Part ID

    Hi All, I am trying to ID the part in the first x2 images. Its was found amongst small parts of scattered wreckage during an archaeological dig on Salisbury Plain. It has been suggested it might be part of a bomb shackle. It is of stainless steel construction. The right hand edge appears to show wear.

    Any ideas appreciated.

    Mark

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  2. #2
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    I found one like this on a Ventura crash site in North Wales in the late 1960's. Bomb shackle part.

    Dave

  3. #3
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    Yes it's part of a bomb release shackle, but it also had other uses such as on the Westland Wyvern where they were used as a lock / release for the dive brake.

    Can be give a more precise location of where it was found please?


    Rob
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  4. #4
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    Thanks Dave. It would be from a larger type aircraft then? some pics of some of the other parts found......

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  5. #5
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    Excellent. Thanks Rob. It is the part adjacent the hook I am thinking? The location where the finds were found were about a mile east of Larkhill in Wiltshire. Not a huge volume of finds but a number of small pieces...

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    Details of the project.... https://www.gov.uk/government/news/f...anctuary-award

  6. #6
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    For info - The paint of the parts is light grey - one has some yellow paint on.

  7. #7
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    Could this be related to this Wyvern crash I wonder. The crash site is slightly imprecise but detailed as 'Severn Barrows' which is otherwise known as 'Kings Barrows' which is approx a mile away from the location where the parts were found.

    http://www.pprune.org/aviation-histo...sh-1950-a.html

  8. #8
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    Interesting! Wyvern VW869 crashed at Seven Barrows one mile west of Amesbury, on the 9th February 1951. Amesbury is of course a stones throw away from Larkhill!


    Rob

  9. #9
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    Would be a nice item for the Boscombe Down Aviation Collection museum. I live near Amesbury and would be happy to try and identify the parts if required?

  10. #10
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    Slightly confused here, maybe I've missed something...

    The third component in Mark's first post is a Mk III* Single Hook Bomb Release Slip as fitted to some British Bomb Carriers. The photo has been lifted off the net for illustration purposes. I'm not sure I can see the component illustrated in the first two photos being a part of one though?

    Part of a Bomb Carrier maybe but not part of a Release Slip?

    (btw, bomb shackles are what Americans hang their bombs on)
    The garage that keeps on giving

  11. #11
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    Thanks all. Tony - yes the Boscombe Down Aviation Museum would be ideal for them to be housed. I will PM you my email and we can follow up!
    Many thanks
    Mark

  12. #12
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    Yes - I dont think its is part of the MKIIIa, but can match to Rob's picture. Allied with the locality of the Wyvern crash, light grey (FAA) paint, balance of probability point to being related to this crash. There is an accident report at the TNA - I will visit and check this week to see if this gives any clues.
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  13. #13
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    I think I have the accident report or part of it plus some photos on another computer. Give me some time and I'll see if I can find it.

    Incidentally Wyvern TF.2 VW869 broke up in mid-air after the canopy came off and hit the vertical stabiliser. This then detached leading to the aircraft yawing so violently that the complete engine and propeller assembly was wrenched from the airframe and fell to the ground. Pilot Lt Hanson ejected but having caught his leg on the control column on leaving the aircraft he was rendered unconscious and fell to the ground still strapped in his seat, poor fellow.

    Bear in mind I'm not saying that this is definately your crashed aircraft though.


    Rob

  14. #14
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    Thanks Rob. I had always thought the dispersion and small nature of the parts could have been the result of breaking up in mid-air or exploding in mid air. Will gratefully await any more info. Would a TF.2 have had an airbrake fitted or were they fiited to all marks?

    On a separate forum an eye witness account is consistent with the detailed location.....'I was stationed at Tilshead at the time and on the way back to camp and about a mile or so from Stonehenge we had a slash stop. Suddenly the sound of an engine in high rev mode turned my head and I saw a Wyvern coming down vertically, and I do mean nose down, which crashed in a field. It's not far from Boscombe of course. It was quite a sight to see.'

    http://www.pprune.org/aviation-histo...sh-1950-a.html

    Mark

  15. #15
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    Yes Wyverns had dive brakes fitted in the top of each wing, but these were only operational on early aircraft, as they were wired shut on later aircraft.


    Rob
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  16. #16
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    Cool. Thanks Rob. I feel a visit to Yeovilton is on the cards!

  17. #17
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    I love the serials on that piece, ive a few unidentified bits also with "ISS" (issue?) and serials beginning with C

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