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Thread: Twatt dowsing and wing recovery

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    8,012

    Twatt dowsing and wing recovery


  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    1,798
    Excellent photos and possibly my favourite thread title of all time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Grantown on Spey
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    2,259
    good to finally see the context of the recovery.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    269
    Interesting article. Makes you wonder what a novel approach might bring up in other airfields. However the final sentence did stand out a little.
    The information we have now is it’s a wing off of a clipped wing Spitfire which was used for high altitude reconnaissance.
    I thought clipped winged spits were for low level flight? That it aided in rolling and general maneouverability. If you wanted to go high up the last thing you'd do is clip the wings. You might even want to add some wing extensions such as found on Mk VI and Mk. VII Spits and others. Is this a wrong assumption?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    2,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Supermarine305 View Post
    Interesting article. Makes you wonder what a novel approach might bring up in other airfields. However the final sentence did stand out a little.

    I thought clipped winged spits were for low level flight? That it aided in rolling and general maneouverability. If you wanted to go high up the last thing you'd do is clip the wings. You might even want to add some wing extensions such as found on Mk VI and Mk. VII Spits and others. Is this a wrong assumption?
    Wasn't the clipped wing Spitfire referred to as "Clipped, Cropped and Clapped out!" ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Lancashire
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    789
    Only the LF Mk.Vb, which was a bit unkind for what was quite a "pocket rocket" as far as performance below 10000ft was concerned. However, by 1944 many of the airframes were getting rather worn.

    I agree that the reference to high altitude recce seems out of place.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Angels one-five over North Bucks.
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    10,419
    A lot of training accidents with fixed wing Seafire II's repaired at nearby Hatston, Orkney.

    Mark

    "...the story had been forensically examined and was deeply impressive. I knew that the whole story was a load of myth and baloney…"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    9,371
    Quote Originally Posted by Supermarine305 View Post
    Is this a wrong assumption?
    Isn't that a cannon-port on the leading edge of the wing also?
    WA$.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    13
    "We had been invited to one of Orkney's biggest World War 2 airfields by William Shearer, a member of A.R.G.O.S (THE Aircraft Recovery Group Orkney and Shetland) to have a scout around to see if we could come up with War Memorabilia and other such stuff that might have been dropped or buried in the past."

    Wait, there's an Aircraft Recovery Group that actually recovers aircraft? Somebody might want to mention this to TIGHAR.

    SN

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    370
    Was the wing ever positively identified to an aircraft? I seem to remember a thread about it but can't find it now?

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