Key.Aero Network
Register Free

Page 4 of 71 FirstFirst 123456781454 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 120 of 2118

Thread: BREXIT - Merged thread.

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    BOLTON Lancs
    Posts
    1,623
    The kilometre is widely used throughout the world: perfectly valid unit of measurement.
    Last edited by Peter; 26th March 2016 at 21:14.

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,790
    [QUOTE=Planemike;2300584]
    Quote Originally Posted by charliehunt View Post
    A jarring and relatively recent innovation is the expression of distances in kilometres (note spelling!!) rather than miles in many documentaries - usually BBC home grown affairs on almost any subject.[/QUOT

    The kilometre is widely used throughout the world: perfectly valid unit of measurement.

    Except for the BBC and some ITV documentaries, not in this country. The statute mile and the nautical mile are the common currencies.

    Yes, the French kilometer is used in much of the rest of the world apart from America and other countries where local measurements are still to be found.

    Social engineering underpins the use of French measurements as it does with a majority of the advertising images that are to be found on our TV screens.

    Hang on to your native culture, soon, it might be all that is left.

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Within striking distance of EGMH - as was!
    Posts
    11,477
    Planemike - I am not disputing that. I am talking about programmes made in English by British companies for British consumption. In Britain the mile is in common currency not the kilometre. I refer you to the signposting should you be in any doubt.

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Luxembourg
    Posts
    2,263
    Some people aren't going to like this suggestion...

    Perhaps there should be an age cut off beyond which people are not allowed to vote on certain things.
    The future that the younger generations will live in for example.
    Reading this it is rather clear that there are a hard core of, shall we say, older folk who are naturally more conservative and reactionary who wish to return the world (and Britain) to some utopian vision of a past that did not exist.

    It merely seems a shame to me that the young folk will potentially have to suffer the consequences of the baby boomers selfish decisions long past the time when that self serving and overly entitled generation has shuffled off this mortal coil.
    The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.
    Bertrand Russell

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,790
    The usual farrago of pyscho babble !

    One of the many advantages of the -shall we refer to - more mature people in any society, is that they fairly obviously have a foot in the past and one in the near future. This should make for an understanding and an appreciation of what has gone before and the lessons to be drawn - if they've got the intelligence and an interest to apply those lessons - and their relevance to the future, and especially if the next generation, who have next to zero connection with the past, can apply them.

    Idyllic, if it works. That is the problem. Mankind, it seems is doomed to repeat the mistakes made in the past because the people who have more future than past, cannot completely learn from those mistakes.

    I write 'completely'. There is some evidence to suggest that all is not lost. Some percentage of past errors can be and is corrected by the next generation. Three steps forward and two back.

    Most societies in the world no matter how primitive or advanced, cherish the sagacity of their aged. Tribal elders are authority figures and esteemed for their wisdom and restrained counselling - except here in the West. Here we shovel them into 'care homes' and reject any responsibility for their welfare as they continue into old age. That is a matter for shame.

    Care of the political elderly is one reason why we have an Upper Chamber; the House of Lords. Aeldermenn, ealdormen, aldermen, oldermen to give the derivative descriptions thru' the ages are, on the whole, of advanced age and form the Upper Chamber with the brief to scrutinise the offerings of the Lower Chamber of the House of Commons.

    That seems to work - after a fashion !

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Within striking distance of EGMH - as was!
    Posts
    11,477
    "It merely seems a shame to me that the young folk will potentially have to suffer the consequences of the baby boomers selfish decisions long past the time when that self serving and overly entitled generation has shuffled off this mortal coil."

    What an amazingly arrogant assumption to make. Quite apart from the fact that it seems to have escaped your attention that the EU is run by large numbers of "baby boomers" (never quite sure what that means) who have brought the EU to the mess it is in and intend to carry on their "good works" until it is utterly destroyed.
    Charlie

    Keep smiling - it's never as bad as you think!!

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,268
    Quote Originally Posted by John Green View Post
    One of the many advantages of the -shall we refer to - more mature people in any society, is that they fairly obviously have a foot in the past and one in the near future.
    Surely one foot in the past and one foot in the grave, John?

    Other than that, I'm wryly amused that those that were so stringently opposed to Scottish independence are now, in some quarters, recycling the same emotive and grievance-driven arguments the nats put to such good use in 2014.

  8. #98
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    North Vancouver (beautiful british columbia) Canada... Tiz a long way frum Devon
    Posts
    880
    Hi
    My slight worry of thought is no brexit, and turkey joins the EU,
    ( I have nothing against turkey or its people)
    it makes possible an almost open door for more 'trouble' to come into europe.
    EU has done a lot for workers rights, but also swamped the labour market.
    A very tough choice for all voting, and I hope we all vote after making ourselves fully educated on the options.
    cheers
    jerry

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Within striking distance of EGMH - as was!
    Posts
    11,477
    Well that's the problem for both sides in the debate. None of us actually knows what the future holds, apart from making a series of educated guesses.

    I am voting leave because I don't believe the European project as driven by its leadsrship has a future. If the vote is to leave then Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty has to be invoked as the UK gives notice to leave the EU. There will follow two or three years of negotiations to detach ourselves from all of our EU relationships and put in place new agreements.

    Only at the end of this will we all know what the world outside the EU will mean. Then we can educate ourselves.

    Mud is being slung on both sides because neither side has many certainties to offer. So scare stories, obfuscation and unsubstantiated threats and promises are splashed across the media to our mutual disadvantage.

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Chichester, Blighty.
    Posts
    669
    What we all seem to lack is the cold hard facts of what's good and what's bad.

    Here's my contribution fwiw. I can only add to the industry/trade part of the argument.

    Having worked in the Aerospace industry for 25 years I see on a daily basis how integrated our trade is with Europe. I work in an office which is mainly British but has a fair number of French, Spanish and other Europeans in it. We are a multinational company as are a lot of our competitors, suppliers and customers. Based on my experience moving around various parts of Europe following various projects we would be destroying a significant amount of trade and further crippling what industry we have left in this country if we leave. I have friends who work in the automotive industry and they have similar experience of this. I appreciate the concerns about our country's ability to absorb other Europeans who may not be contributing to our country's financial well being, though a lot of them do, but we should try to address this from within the EU first.

    One significant conversation I had with some of my German and French friends/colleagues occurred in a pub in Germany where I was living at the time the Euro came in. I asked them what other Europeans though of the UK. The response was that they saw us as a somewhat troublesome island off the coast of Europe proper that only joined in when it suited, we only got a look in on some trade because we were in the gang. If we weren't in the gang (the EU) then we wouldn't be included. A bit like the unpopular kid at school who only got picked for the football team cos he was in the class. Come playtime, everyone ignored him and had a kick about without him.

    So the question is do we lose more from staying in with dodgy rules about the shape of Bananas and foreigners sending child benefit back home (that's my tax money !) but still have jobs for our youngsters to go into cause we don't have an empire anymore and we're not big enough to go it alone or do we pull up the drawbridge and stagnate ?

    Also, If we do leave what do we do about foreign nationals that are already here ? My children have a significant number of first generation British classmates who's parents are not indigenous but only know the UK as home. As a result of my wandering around Europe my children are half German as well !

    Leaving the EU will be a costly mess, it won't be like changing your bank. If we had a stronger manufacturing industry we might get away with Brexit, but we don't. Based on my experiences I think it's too risky.
    Last edited by Shorty01; 23rd March 2016 at 22:52. Reason: correcting typos
    It's the one you don't see that gets you (usually)...

  11. #101
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Within striking distance of EGMH - as was!
    Posts
    11,477
    Re your first paragraph - because the facts of what is good and what is bad are open to interpretation. What is good for one is bad for another and vice versa.

    Your personal experience of your dealings in the EU are just that. And you will find a hundred and a thousand other examples of pub talk in pubs across the EU where there is agreement with your experience to those in complete disagreement with it. I have experienced the latter with disaffected Euro members from Denmark to Italy.

  12. #102
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    South East Essex
    Posts
    4,619
    There is no doubt that if we leave the EU, it won't be a seamless departure.

    Hopefully it will be worth a few headaches, to get back in charge of our own destiny ?
    It's the long term prospects that really matter, not what might happen over the next four or five years.
    Engine Failure:.... A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air.

  13. #103
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Within striking distance of EGMH - as was!
    Posts
    11,477
    Your last sentence is spot on. And anyone who seriously believes in the long term success of the EU is living in cloud cuckoo land. Look at what it has come to in the last twenty years and extrapolate that overbloated autocracy over the next twenty years and total collapse is inevitable. So we need to get out now before we find ourselves having to escape the doomed enterprise, when it's too late.
    Charlie

    Keep smiling - it's never as bad as you think!!

  14. #104
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,790
    Shorty01

    Don't be afraid to take risks. That, among some other desirable traits is what made this country the leading trading nation. No economic grouping anywhere in the world, the EU included, can afford to ignore a soon-to-be market of 70,000,000 consumers.

    Whether we like it, or understand it, or not, because of the actions of its seriously misguided politicians, Europe is in turmoil. The millions at present seeking economic benefit will multiply. Already I live in a country that in some parts I do not anymore recognise. Some may say it doesn't matter. I say that it does. I live in a country in Northern Europe that subscribes to a set of values, habits and culture that is being eroded by the impact of peoples arriving from other cultures and determined to impose their values. This is leading to a backlash that others have long forecast.

    We can do nothing about this just as long as this country is governed from Brussels. And that, is the single most fundamental argument for leaving the EU; sovereignty ! Control of our destiny in all aspects. Nothing else matters. As for your claim that 'we're not big enough to go it alone'. How on earth did we manage to build the world's premier trading nation over the last three centuries ? We weren't part of any significant trading blocks. We had trade agreements and they sufficed exactly as they would to-day if we left the EU.

    Have some confidence in your country and its capacity for innovation, invention and application. We need to remind ourselves of what we once were. Independent, fearless, entrepreneurial, adaptable. To paraphrase someone, 'we have nothing to fear, but fear itself'.

  15. #105
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,268
    Quote Originally Posted by John Green View Post
    Don't be afraid to take risks. That, among some other desirable traits is what made this country the leading trading nation. No economic grouping anywhere in the world, the EU included, can afford to ignore a soon-to-be market of 70,000,000 consumers.
    You sound like Alex Salmond towards the middle of 2014. Are LBC radio going to offer you a prime time slot in a few years?
    Last edited by Meddle; 24th March 2016 at 20:06. Reason: Too much wine, not enough proof reading.

  16. #106
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Chichester, Blighty.
    Posts
    669
    Just adding my experiences into the discussion as I felt they are relevant.

    I have confidence in my country to innovate & invent, I spend some of my time on Outreach sessions talking to schools about the spacecraft we build, trying to inspire the next generation into STEM subjects so they get to innovate and invent. It is heartening to see the children's enthusiasm.

    The fact that we are discussing this on an aircraft forum implies most people here have some interest in STEM, but in my experience, a significant portion of the country doesn't give a stuff. I feel like the BEF fighting a rearguard action at Dunkirk sometimes defending British engineering. I feel like a curiosity, "oh you're an engineer, do we still do that in this country ?" is the response. Maybe I live too near the London commuter belt. I can rant about this for hours so I'll stop there as it's getting off topic.
    Last edited by Shorty01; 24th March 2016 at 21:33. Reason: clarification of point
    It's the one you don't see that gets you (usually)...

  17. #107
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,790
    You do me too much honour ! I prefer it when you revert to Chuckle brother mode and slag me off.

    Salmond ? Scottish working class hero - or, so it is said.

  18. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    South East Essex
    Posts
    4,619
    Quote Originally Posted by Shorty01 View Post
    I spend some of my time on Outreach sessions talking to schools about the spacecraft we build, trying to inspire the next generation into STEM subjects so they get to innovate and invent. It is heartening to see the children's enthusiasm.
    I have a friend (a retired engineer) who belongs to a group who do a similar thing in Essex. He goes to schools explaining to
    teachers, how to get the children interested in various aspects of engineering, and sitting in on lessons to answer questions
    from pupils.
    Engine Failure:.... A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air.

  19. #109
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Where you wish you were.
    Posts
    8,866
    It sounds like the EU needs some PR in the UK.
    After the Brussels attack there was a news item about the EU security dept warning Belgium about a possible threat. Now, an overall pan European security service is something where the EU could "earn its keep".

    In other words, quit focusing on the shape of bananas and second guessing national parliaments (and thus giving legitimacy to those who rightly fear for their nation's sovereignty) to focus on its basic mission of trade and sectors like security where it can be of real use.
    There are two sides to every story. The truth is usually somewhere between the two.

  20. #110
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,790
    JB

    The EU is in a 'flat spin'. Total panic is the order of the day. Security ? Don't make me laugh. They simply do not know what to do with the problem of their own making.

    And now ? Visa free access to the EU for another 80,000,000 Moslems is the latest wheeze.

    How do the EU manage a credible security taskforce? Which language will they use ? At the moment instructions, orders and the like will have to be issued in all the languages of the various member states. How will that work given the need for an instant response to most security breaches.

    Commonality of methods ? I'm gurgling with mirth ! Angela pulls the string and the rest dance to her tune. She is the one that has invited 80,000,000 Turks into Europe.

  21. #111
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    261
    64 Per Cent Of Dutch Referendum Voters Reject EU, 32 Per Cent Turnout

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016...u-64-per-cent/

    Looks like the Dutch have sent a strong message to the EU - 'no' to expansion into Ukraine.

    Gives us a pointer to our own referendum on June 23rd.

  22. #112
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Within striking distance of EGMH - as was!
    Posts
    11,477
    Some crumbs of comfort for sure but with under a third of the Dutch electorate bothering to turn out it is hardly an earth shattering result. And it begs an Interesting question - I wonder what our turn out will be in June.........

  23. #113
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    South East Essex
    Posts
    4,619
    Historically it's the younger generation who are less likely to vote.
    Those who have never been in a non-EU UK, and are more likely to
    be influenced by "project fear".

    Just to add. When the Stay In leaflet arrives here, it will be posted back to No.10
    Last edited by ~Alan~; 7th April 2016 at 08:14.
    Engine Failure:.... A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air.

  24. #114
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,025
    Hi John.

    Turkey are still in denial about the Armenian Genocide they started on 24 April 1915...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Genocide

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxYV8laEB5E
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    Wrong Forum!

  25. #115
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Within striking distance of EGMH - as was!
    Posts
    11,477
    [QUOTE=~Alan~;2305233
    Just to add. When the Stay In leaflet arrives here, it will be posted back to No.10[/QUOTE]

    That's two copies they'll get back, then!!
    Charlie

    Keep smiling - it's never as bad as you think!!

  26. #116
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    699
    I send all the probrexist stuff back to senders.......without a stamp

  27. #117
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Within striking distance of EGMH - as was!
    Posts
    11,477
    Well at least you've had some!
    Charlie

    Keep smiling - it's never as bad as you think!!

  28. #118
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    699
    Yes I have, and they make what I have seen of the one we are getting from the govt. look like Shakespeare -hysterical poorly written twaddle full of grammatical errors is an understatement.

    Having seen what has been on the news today, I think I'll send my copy of the HMG pamphlet to Liam Fox as he clearly hasn't read it.


    Without a stamp again of course

  29. #119
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,790
    64% ? That is a heck of a margin !

    MrBlueSky

    Yes, genocide in which the culprits have never properly been brought to book.

  30. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,790
    Trekkie,

    Very obviously the product of State school 'education' !

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

- Part of the    Network -

KEY AERO AVIATION NEWS

MAGAZINES

AVIATION FORUM

SHOP

 

WEBSITES